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An Illustrated Journal of Mining, 



BY T>KWEY A- CO., 

1'iit.uit Nolltlliii-i. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATTJEDAT, JULY 5, 1873. 



VOLUME XXVII. 
Number t, 



Arctic Travel and Adventure. 

The recent disastrous termination of the 
Polaris expedition, resulting in the death of its 
noble leader, Captain Hall, and the virtual 
abandonment of the enterprise, has turned 
public attention to a great extent towards 
those icy seas. Since the events conneoted 
with the failure of the expedition have become 



in Arctic expeditions, while others see no prac- 
tical value in either. However this may be, 
there is no doubt but that thousands of people 
have a mania for reading descriptions of 
travel and adventure in the ioy regions of the 
North Pole, and who would, if they had a 
chance, make a rough and dangerous trip there 
with much more pleasure than to the sunny 
South Sea Islands, or anywhere else. 



property. Among the perils recorded may 
be mentioned the loss of the Arctic whaling 
fleet in the ioe off Ioy Cape. The fleet con- 
sisted of 4:1 ships, which arrived off the Cape 
on the 6th of August. The wind was blowing 
from the northeast, bringing down large quan- 
tities of ice, so it was with difficulty that they 
worked their way to Blossom Shoals, latitude 
7(P 20* north and 121° west. They found a 
passage here from half to three-quarters of a 
mile from the shore to the main body of ice. 



their boats, abandoning their ships, and boarded 
those of their more fortunate comrades. An 
idea of the situation of these vessels, raised up 
and crushed by the ice, can be seen in the ac- 
companying illustration. Only seven out of the 
forty-one ships were saved at the time, but sev- 
eral have been taken out of the ice sinco. The 
majority, however, were a total loss. The sailors 
experienced considerable hardships while in the 
open boats, but were safely brought to Honolulu 
by the rescued vessels and thence to this city. 




WHALING FLEET IN THE ARCTIC REGIONS. 



public, people who never gave the subject a 
second thought, have begun to read the nu- 
merous works on Arctic exploration, and have 
a better idea of the purposes for which the 
different expeditions were inaugurated, and 
the objects they sought to accomplish. Opin- 
ions differ as to tho practical results to follow, 
even if the most sanguine expectations were 
realized. Some people cannot comprehend 
how others will risk their lives, encounter 
hardships and peril, in all the severity of an 
Arctic climate, merely to prove or disprove a 
theory. Some who appreciate the endeavors 
of Livingstone, Speke, Burton, Du Chaillu and 
others in exploring Africa, fail to see any good 



Leaving aside all .romance and theoretical 
conclusions as to travel iu these regions, the 
hardy American whalers know that there is 
money to be made thereabouts, which is an all- 
sufficient incentive for them to go there. Dur- 
ing the whaling season, the peculiar barks 
whose paint, rig, and boats distinguish their 
calling, may be seen searching the seas on 
both sides of the Continent for their bulky 
prey, and cruising about in every direction. 
The men become inured to hardship and rough 
weather, and seem to prefer the occupation to 
any other. It occasionally happens, however, 
that most disastrous consequences result in 
the voyages to the Arctic, and numbers of ships 
are lost every year. No year, perhaps, will 
compare with that of 1871, in loss of life and 



through which they passed. As they advanced 
it became wider, and the fleet kept ascending 
as far as Wainwright Inlet. During several 
weeks they had a number of severe storms 
and winds from south to northwest. Soon 
after the wind shifted to west, setting the ice 
on shore and drifting it with great force against 
the ships. Several ships were caught and crush- 
ed at that time. The former experience of the 
masters told them that at this season of the 
year the ice would float off shore, and they ex- 
pected it would then do so. The ships were lying 
in a narrow strip of water with ice on one side 
and land on the other, The northeast gale, 
which it was expected would liberate them, did 
not come, but instead the southeast and south- 
west gales piled the ice and bergs up until the 
vessels were crushed. Several ships were out- 
side, and the crews of the wrecked ones took to 



The immense power of moving ice is well 
illustrated in this instance, and no doubt the 
experience of that cruise damped the ardor of 
many a whaler and incipient explorer. As 
these men work on a "lay " or share of nrofitB, 
the whole voyage was a dead loss to them as 
well as the owners. Massachusetts was the 
heaviest sufferer, and most of the vessels be- 
longed there. The whaling captains on this 
coast became great observers of the movements 
of currents, ice flows, tides, etc., and have a 
great stock of valuable information on such 
subjects. Many of them are very intelligent, 
observant men, who keep records of many 
peculiar facts which would not appear in an 
ordinary log-book. The Coast Survey is in- 
debted to them for considerable valuable 
information concerning the coast about Alaska 
and above. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS- 



[July 5> 1873. 



Correspondence. 



The Vienna Exposition. 

[By our Bpocial Correspondent— Gdtdo Ktjstel.] 
One-sixth of the time of the "World's Exposi- 
tion passed away and certainly not to general 
satisfaction, or rather to nobody's satisfaction; 
and if there is an exception it might be limited 
to the Berlin newspapers, who delight in put- 
ting down the Exposition, Vienna and the 
whole Austrian people. "Why, is not known, 
perhapfl jealousy is the cause. Those papers 
say the Exposition is a grand failure, and in 
this they may be right, to some degree; al- 
though one mouth out of six cannot be consid- 
ered decisive, especially when the fact is known 
that from the day of the opening of the Expo- 
sition to the first of June, twenty-five days out 
of thirty, were cold, disagreable and gloomy; 
and fifteen of the former, rainy. The rain and 
the Berlin news- writers, their correspondents 
included, seem to be the strongest 

Opponents to the Success of the Exposition. 
The unfinished condition is to be regretted, 
but some consolation may be found in the 
recollection of the Paris Exposition of 1867, 
where, in spite of a great deal earlier com- 
mencement of a smaller concern, the park was, 
a month after the opening, a great deal more 
in disorder than is at present in Vienna. In 
fact, however, there is no disorder visible here, 
except in some places between the Industrial 
Palace and Machinery Hall. The Park in 
front of the Palace, with the basins and foun- 
tains, the alleys with large blooming trees, 
green carpets of English grass, etc., where a 
few months ago was nothing but a'wilderness, 
looks like the work of magic; and if one 
considers all their gigantic creation, he must 
admit the possibility of the expenditure of 
twenty millions of florins, (as is said,) and 
this is the weak point, the point that might be 
a failure, — there will likely be a deficit. 

But the Vienna people are not discouraged 
yet, they expect from the future what the 
month of May refused; the extravagant charges 
for board, lodging and so forth, are greatly 
reduced. After the rain comes sunshine, and 
there is no reason why the 10,000 Americans 
should not come after all, who have been ad- 
vertised some days ago. 

Notwithstanding the very unfavorable weath- 
er, the daily average of 

Paying Visitors 
In May, was, according to the Neue Freie Presse, 
10,200, while at the same time, at the London 
Exposition of 1862, not more than 13,700 have 
been counted per day, in average. But there 
are three millions and a half of inhabitants in 
London, and less than one million in Vienna, 
so that, taking also the difference of weather 
in consideration, Vienna is better off, in com- 
parison, than London was, so far as the first 
month is concerned. But even if the month 
of May should be considered as prognosticating 
the future, the Vienna Exposition, in regard to 
visitors, would be equal with, those of London 
and Paris; but there is good reason to expect a 
far better result. 

Leaving the money business out of the ques- 
tion, the Exposition of 1873, 

As an International Affair, 
The main object of which is the stirring up of 
industrial emulation amongst all the nations of 
the world, by exhibiting the evidence of pro- 
gress in all branches of industry and science, 
is the most brilliant success that could be ex- 
pected. This is admitted by all who examine 
the matter from that point of view. On the 
first of June 28,704 persons visited the Exposi- 
tion, although the rain poured down all day. 
The second of June was a clear lovely day, 
andinduced 70,108 visitors to spend all the day 
in admiration and delight. 

But the Exposition is not yet complete. In the 
most of the side-galleries the fixing-up goes on, 
more or less. The American department in 
the Industrial Palace is shut up yet, but it has 
already a face, and will be opened in a short 
time; the American school-house, near the 
American department of the Industrial Palace, 
is almost ready. The American 
Agricultural Hall 
Does not show many interesting machines, 
which is much regretted by the German, Aus- 
trian, and Hungarian farmers, who seem to 
give preference to American machines. The 
English are considered too heavy, and, in 
other respects, less practical. The English 
agricultural machines are constructed in ac- 
cordance with their local requirements, which 
are different in some respects from those on 
the Continent, but the Euglish manufacturers 
would not take any notice of it, till of late, 
when they observed, perhaps too late, that 
Germany and Austria commenced to turn out 
themselves seed-sowing and other machines 
suitable for their horses, which are smaller 
and weaker than the English. The American 
mowing machines exhibited here are praised 
very much; they differ considerably from the 
English. The former are light, elegant in 
shape, are made of the best material; the wood 
is hickory and the cast-iron malleable. If 
anything is objectionable with them, it is that 
they may be even too light to do work for ten 
or fifteen years. Each machine has a com- 
fortable seat for the driver, exactly in the right 



place, and much more appreciated here than 
the seats on the English machines of the same 
kind. The threshing machine is of the usual 
construction in the United States. Several 
American plows are exhibited, and amongst 
them a gang-plow, which creates a good deal 
of interest amongst people who understand it. 
It is much regretted that no American hay- 
making machines have been exposed, especially 
those to rake, turn, and load the hay on the 
wagons. They are considered original>nd of 
great perfection, but there are yet many boxes 
yet untouched, containing perhaps some more 
of interesting machines. 

In the Machinery Hall 
The work is progressing, but nothing is in mo- 
tion yet— that is in the American department. 
Each land has its own power and a separate 
frame for the Bhaf ts and are entirely independ- 
ent of each other. From the separate boiler 
houses the steam is conducted underground to 
the engines, of which each country has its own 
motor, at the same time aB an exhibited ma- 
chine. The power is transmitted to the main 
shaft by belts. All the boxes for the main 
shafts are of American pattern, which allows a 
vertical and horizontal motion in adjusting the 
shafts. From each main steam pipe, steam 
can be obtained for single machines. Germany, 
Belgium, France andEnglandhave their shafts 
running every day, but only a small part of the 
machinery is in motion as yet, it is, however, 
expected that in two weeks from now all will 
be in motion. 

Japan 
Ib now open to all people. It is not only their 
gallery full of interesting objects, that attracts 
the visitors, but one is also able to see Japan. 
Behind the palace of the Viceroy of Egypt there 
are houses, gardens, streets, temples and ba- 
zars, and it gives a perfect picture of the Ja- 
panese life. The material which they use for 
building their houses, they shipped from 
Japan. It is the " Tschinocki " wood and 
"Singi" wood. It is a kind of cedar wood 
which spreads quite an agreeable odor when 
cut or planed. The Japanese are fond of flag- 
staffs and have several of them before the 
houses, the flags showing the flower " Aster " 
which is the signe of the reigning dynasty- 
This signe one meets everywhere in the Japan, 
ese quarters. Many Japanese plants have been 
shipped with the intention to increase the 
Japanese character of this small settlement, 
but the most of them spoiled before they ar- 
rived in Vienna; the bamboo however is sound. 
The houses on both sides of the street are two- 
stories high. The windows have no glass but 
are provided with fine wood oarving, through 
which the light is admitted; some have pre- 
pared paper. A small pond is at the end of 
the garden and a Japanese bridge of yellow 
wood leads over the pond to an artifiicial hill. 
The bridge is quite a nice work with elegant 
railings. On the top of the hill is a small tem- 
ple, the " Mija." This temple is the model of 
one that was built not far from Kjotch, the old 
metropolis of Mi Kados in the land of Iche. 



Arizona Mines. 



A correspondent of the Alia writing from 
Wallapai District, says: The wise policy of our 
great hero and Indian fighter, General Crook, 
has already caused an influx of prospectors and 
capitalists into the rich and unexplored mineral 
belts of this great Territory. If men of capital 
and brains could be induced to come here, they 
would realize more than the most sanguine of 
them could expect. Look, for instance, at the 
vast number of lodes in this district, being de- 
veloped by the hardy and industrious miners, 
who, unaided by capital, have laid bare some 
of the rich st rock ever Irought to sight; their 
dump piles will corroborate my statement. 

All we ask is that some of the practical min- 
ing experts should summon up enough of cour- 
age to visit our district, and especially some of 
our principal mines; for instance, the Lone 
Star, down 132 feet, noted for its rich silver- 
bearing quartz. They have about forty-five 
tons of rich specimens on the dump, any piece 
of which would be considered a beautiful cab- 
inet specimen. The other day I had the pleas- 
ure of being introduced to the energetic Super- 
intendent of the celebrated Ida Mine. This 
gentlman (Mr. John Lawson) has about nixty 
tons of ore on the dump, and by the glow of 
satisfaction on his face, I am well assured that 
his reports of the richness of the ore are au- 
thentic. He has a large force at work, three 
shifts, and they are down 110 feet. The 
rock assays largely in gold, as well as in silver 
and to show you the confidence our people 
have in this celebrated mine, I will merely 
state, as a fact, that certificates in this mine 
are taken at three dollars per share in all 
transactions of business. 

The Cupel and Tiger Mining Company are 
pushing things under the able management of 
Mr. Chas. Spencer, who is Superintendent. I 
have not been able to visit these . valuable 
mines, but the reports are very favorable; the 
hoisting works, and a large force of miners are 
busy night and day. 

The New Era is shipping six to eight hun- 
dred dollar rock to the mill at Mineral Park; 
and the Sixty-three mine is shipping rich ore 
to San Francisco. 

Good reports are coming in from the new 
discovery, the Hope mine, but the Hibernia 
lode will do to swear by. Mr. Jas. Keid has a 
claim of fifteen hundred feet on this great dyke 
or lode of quartz, which is ten feet in width, 
and the croppings assay $130 per ton. The 
oroppings of the lead are easily found for 26 
miles. 



The San Diego Mines. 

Our traveling correspondent writes us from 
Julian City, San Diego county, as follows: 

The Golden Chariot is one of the principal 
mines in the county. The lowest grade of , ore 
taken from where the ledge is 12 feet wide at a 
depth of 125 feet averages $50 per ton. The 
higher grade of ore where the ledge runs three 
feet wide and 125 feet deep, averages from $100 
to $150 per ton. This mine is crushing at present 
eight tons of ore per day, the cost of which 
does not exceed $4 per ton for milling. The 
last clean-up for two weeks ending the8thinst, 
produced a gross yield of $10,000. 

The mine has taken out rock, 100 tons of 
which yielded them the snug sum of $32,000; 
this we consider a very handsome clean up. 
The mine now runs a five-stamp mill, and will 
at an early day add five stamps more, increase 
the power of the engine, and provide greater 
facilities for the reduction of their ore. The 
mill now used by them was built upon quite 
extensive plans, and will accomodate any im- 
provements they may wish to add from time to 
time. .The level in their mine is now run; they 
will commence stoping in a few dayB, when 
they will take out some two or three hundred 
dollar rock. The Golden Chariot has shipped 
more gold to San Francisco mint from April 1st 
to June 10th, onaccount of having their own mill 
than all the other mines combined that are lo- 
cated within the districts of Julian and Banner. 
This does not inolude the celebrated Stonewall. 
The present owners are James B. Lang, Joseph 
Coyne, and Duncan McLellan. The stamp mill 
is superintended by Chester Gunn. The mill 
is located 2% miles from the mine. A good 
wagon road enables them to transport ore at 
$1.50 per ton — with water facilities and every- 
thing required — to their hand. 

An extension of the Golden Chariot was re- 
cently discovered by Henry Young and Harry 
"Worth, nine miles southeast. The ore taken 
from this extension, which is only croppings, 
assays $20 to the ton, with a positive lead of 
2,000 feet, making this a real " chip of the old 
block." 

The Stonewall Mine. 
The Stonewall is located at the foot of the 
Cuyamaca Peaks, seven and a half miles from 
Julian City. The ledge runs from five 
to twenty-six feet in width at a pitch of 70 de- 
grees to the west. Hanging wall, slate; foot 
wall, granite. The walls average twelve feet 
apart. This entire space is good paying ore, ex- 
cept at times a small strata of what miners 
term "horse," which is a conglomerate of slate 
granite and quartz. Notwithstanding this, the 
Stonewall runs everything through their stamps 
and find it quite profitable, which confirms the 
previous statement of its being one of the most 
regular paying mines within our State. Their 
shipments of bullion are about $10,000 per 
month at a cost to them of $2,000 per month. 

Their facilities of machinery and convenience 
of wood, timber, lumber, etc., make the actual 
cost of working this mine a mere trifle, as no 
blasting has yet been done or is likely to be re- 
quired. The shaft was sunk to a depth of 60 
feet, and a level run 500 feet; at the north end 
of this level 100 feet has been stoped to the 
surface, averaging 12 feet in width. At the 
south end 36 feet has been stoped with the 
same average width. This shaft has been con- 
tinued to a depth of 140 feet, and a level each 
way run 150 feet. 

The width of the ledge continues with rock a 
little harder and the gold a little coarser. 
Their mill is a new ten-stamp mill, erected 
about six months ago. The building is 60 by 
100, and is so situated that when the rock is 
dumped from the mine no handling is required 
from thence to the battery. Their eneine is f orty- 
hoise power and aboiler capacity sufficient to run 
a twenty-stamp mill. The superintendent, Mr. 
A. P. Frary states that $3-rock can be run at 
a profit. Upon examination of the lower level 
which is 140 feet in depth, with a level run 300 
feet; some idea of the immensity of this mine 
may be had, especially when we remember that 
the rock intervening is all good paying ore; it 
being generally understood by experienced 
miners, that when a water level is reached a 
ledge of ore is likely to continue to anindifinite 
period. Their criterion is that as you find it 
at water level so it likely continues for 1,000 to 
1,500 feet or more; and should the Stonewall 
prove its present prospects, the time will come 
when its present owners will look at no price. 
The present owners of this mine are A. P. 
Frary, F. E. Farley, and J. M. Farley. The 
Stonewall mine is not in dispute, their title to 
property being clear and valid. 

The Owens Mine 

Is located within the Julian District, one-half 
mile from Julian City." The ledge runs from 
one to six feet wide at a depth of 300 feet. 
This mine is now being sunk to a depth of 600 
feet, and in the meanwhile will run levels and 
stope when it is found necessary. The rook 
average $75 per ton, at the depth of 275 feet; 
the rock now prospects on the lower level $75 
per ton. A new ledge has been discovered 
which is likely to run into the original, which 
will make an immense ledge. Work on this 
mine is progressing day and night under the 
superintendency of W. R. DeFrees — who takes 
charge from and after this date, June 12th, 
1873. The present owners of this mine are W. 
R. DeFrees, A. DeFrees, T. S. Moore, James 
, Kelly, H.J. Booth. Their mill is situated 
I one-half mile from the mine where an abun- 



dance of water can be had and wood obtained 
at a trifling expense. 

This mine crushes 14 tons of ore per day 
through a 10-stamp mill, at a cost of $2.50 per 
ton. The machinery used, both at the mine 
and mill, are of the best make, and have all 
the late improvements, making their facilities 
equal, if not superior, to other mines in this 
district. Their hoisting machinery at the mine 
is veryfine,with a wire rope of 600 ft. .warranted 
to hoist 8,000 5)8.; also an improved engine, 
which can be worked and reversed as required. 
Twenty men are employed day and night at 
their mine and seven at their mill. 

The Tom Scott and Eureka. 

The ledge has been sunk to the depth of 100 
feet. The ledge will average in width from 
two to four feet, and prospects — rock finer and 
gold coarser. There never has been taken from 
these mines one tub of ore which failed to 
show free gold. These mines have been self- 
supporting. The owners are C. W. Swain, 
W. W. Swain, O. L. Bashford, and W. H. 
Julian. 

The California 

Is one thousand feet due west of the "Owens" 
mine. The ledge averages 2 feet wide and 110 
feet deep, hanging wall and foot wall slate; 
width of walls 8 feet. Work will be resumed 
July 1st, by D. H. Snyder and Ira Wentworth, 
its present owners. The rock taken from the 
mine will average $18 — three hundred tons of 
which gave a yield of $5,400. 
^ The Helvetia 
Is located one mile from Julian City. The 
ledge runs an average width of three feet, with 
walls of about 6 feet; hanging and foot walls, 
both slate. The depth of ledge is 240 feet; the 
rock will average from $28 to $30 per ton. 
Work upon this mine is continued day and 
night. An addition of owners in this mine 
will insure its " forward march," as machinery 
for working the mine thoroughly will be placed 
in position before the 1st of August. 

The Ready Relief 
Is owned by Baily Bros., and is located about 
4 miles east of Julian, in Banner District. The 
ledge runs from 2 to 6 feet. The depth of 
this ledge is from 100 to 150 feet. The rock 
which this mine mills will run from $75 to 
$100 per ton. They are running both mine 
and mill day and night by water power. 

The Eagle Mine 
Is located within 400 yards of Julian City. The 
ledge is from 2 to 2% feet wide; wall slate, 125 
feet deep, with one drift due west, connecting 
with main shaft by tunnel. The rock is of a 
rebellious nature. Its owners are, Bobt. Lea- 
lie, D. Lipman and T. Bundy. 

West Point Mines. 

After the letter of our correspondent, " L. P. 
Mc, M came to hand and was printed in our 
last issue, he sent us some additional 
particulars from West Point, Calaveras 
County, as follows : There are at this pres- 
ent time, quite a number of gold mines 
being worked in this locality — this district has 
been very much neglected for some years in 
point of capital, and the mines have been 
chiefly worked by Mexicans down to the water 
level, and hard formation of the country rock. 
They have always found good pay at this dis- 
tance, as they seldom send any ore to the 
custom mills that does not pay from 20 to 30 
dollars per ton. 

Among the prominent mines, is the Pancho, 
only a short distance from the Lone Star Mine. 
This mine is being worked by means of tun- 
nels, of which there are five run in on the 
ledge, all in good ore. No machinery is re- 
quired to work this mine to advantage. The 
quartz shows free gold in paying quantities. 
Then comes the Josephine mine, on the same 
side, but facing the Middle Fork of the 
Moklumne River. This mine has also val- 
uable property, and has been worked by 
shafts, and one or two small tunnels, paying 
good profits to its present owners. On the 
opposite side of the river, is the celebrated 
Woodhouse lead, now being worked with pay- 
ing results. 

Up the other way from West Point, on what 
is known as Skull Flat is the Zacatara, and 
the old Billy Williams mine which have 
turned out good results in their day. 
"The Ohio Consolidated Mine," 

Is principally owned by San Francisco parties. 
This mine was incorporated March 13, 1872, 
with 25,000 shares, and like many other mines 
badly managed until of late. 

The Company found it to their advantage to 
employ a thorough and practical Superintend- 
ent, Mr. S. D. Merchant, who has put the 
whole thing in good shape, and upon a paying 
basis. He now has the shaft down 150 ft., 
with drifts, and a large body of ore in sight. 
They are now crushing ore which promises 
good results. 

The election of trustees took place on June 
19, 1873, as follows : W. G. Wayman (Presi- 
dent), Benj. Dore, G. W. Stuart, Jas. Fulton, 
W. J. Hamilton, W. Aug. Knapp (Secretary), 
National Gold Bank and Trust Company 
(Treasurer), 

The following item in relation to this mine I 
clip from a city paper: Letters from West Point 
state that the Superintendent now has a much 
larger body of ore in sight than he had antici- 
pated from former knowledge of the mine, and 
that the future outlook of the company is of 
the moBt flattering kind. The connection in 
the raise with the drain-tunnel and the ventila- 
tion is now perfect. The raise shows an un- 



July 5, 1873-] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



broken lode from top to bottom. The proba- 
bilities are that there will be ore yet for 1 50 
feet Bouth. A cross-course was struck a few 
days ago, the first one yet known in the dis- 
trict ; it adds greatly in value to the mine. The 
improvements at the mine consist of excellent 
hoisting works, with water power; a drain- 
tunnel, 330 feet in length; north drift over 30 
feet; cross-drift 41 feet long; raise, 32 feet 
high; north Btope, open some t)0 feet, with 
about 50 tons of ore on the dump, which pros- 
pects and will assay from $50 to $60 per ton. 
The cross drift to the east veiu will bo in by the 
15th inst., when the main body of ore will be 
reached 80 feet below where it has been 
worked; it paid* at that point above, by mill 
process, $77 per ton. 

In addition to the above, it is known that 
the company has not a dollar of Indebtedness, 
and nil this has been accomplished in the most 
economical manuor. Only three assessments 
have been levied during the punt fifteen months, 
and within thirty days the company will have 
the result of their first crnshings. 

Numbering or Classifying the Gomstock 
Mines. 

A thoughtful correspondent, (A. F. G.,of Sac- 
ramento), referring to the advantage to outsid- 
ers of having the various mines on the Com- 
Htoi'k so numbered or lettered that the relative 
position of each on tho great lode can thereby 
be easily determined by the casual observer, 
recommends that in our table of fluctuations 
we divide mines into their natural divisions, 
viz: South West Branch, South East Branch, 
(starting from Silver City or Daney, running 
east to Seg. Belcher) , and then Main Gomstock 
lead. 

We have simply to say that without arrang- 
ing them in alphabetical order, so far as our 
table is concerned, it would be impracticable 
for us to make the constant changes occurring 
in the figures with facility and correctness. 



ciENTinc Progress. 



e 



Rotation of Liquids. 

In a recent French Journal of Science is a 
ttper by M. Desire Gernetz, on the rotation of 
[quids. M. Gernetz says: When a ray of light 
fulls on an inclined plane which reflects it 
through a tube similarly inclined at a certain 
angle (50° in atmospheric air), then, if the re- 
flected ray lies in the same plane with the in- 
cident ray, there is no loss of light; but if the 
two rays lie in different planes, the reflected 
one wiil be weaker, and even be hardly visible, 
if at right angleB to the plane of the other; 
the light is then said to be polarized. Now, 
in passing through different substances, the 
angle of the two planes is called the power of 
rotation, because you would have to turn one 
of the planes round a certain number of de- 
gress, in order to obtain the beam of light in 
its natural state. This power of rotation was 
first observed in quartz, by Arago, in 1811, and 
in various liquids, by Biot, in 1815. 

When the plane of polarization deviates to 
the right, it is called dextrogyre; when to the 
left, levogyre. M, Gernetz 'a experiments tend 
to determine the rotatory power of certain 
liquids at different temperatures, by means of 
certain delicate arrangements, which it is not 
our province to describe; the liquids experi- 
mented upon being essence of turpentine, which 
is levogyre, the essences of sweet and bitter 
oranges, and a solution of camphor, which are 
all dextrogyre. 1. The results at which he ar- 
rives are these : The rotatory power of active 
liquids for the same ray right of light depends 
upon the temperature; 2. When the tempera- 
ture approaches boiling-point, the rotary 
power varies with some rapidity; 3. When the 
liquid is reduced to the state of vapor, the rota- 
tory power does not change its direction; that 
is, it remains levogyre, if it was so before, and 
conversely; and 4. The law of dispersion of the 
planeof polarization of any ray of the solar 
spectrum is the same at all temperatures. 

Practical. Use of the Carbonic Acid Re- 
sultlng from Fermentation. — E. Pfeiffer has 
devised a plan for economizing the waste 
carbonic acid resulting from the fermentation 
of wort, the manufacture of vinegar from 
champagne vats, and the like. The fermenting 
vessels are covered, and, by means of exhaust- 
ers, the air is drawn off and is found to contain 
from twenty to twenty-five per cent, carbonic 
acid. This can Berve for the manufacture of 
bicarbonates, and, if the gas were to be con- 
densed, could be converted into a motive 
power, employed in the manufacture of soda 
water, or used for artificial refrigeration. At 
any rate, there would appear to be no reasona- 
ble excuse for wasting so much carbonic acid. 
If somebody would only devise a practicable 
plan by which the enormous amount of car- 
bonio acid, produced by gas burners or 
axhaled from the lungs of large audiences in 
our churches, theaters, and public halls, could 
be drawn off,?got out of the way, and devoted 
to some purpose more useful than suffocating 
and poisoning multitudes of people, he would 
confer a great boon on mankind, and would be 
cordially welcome to any remuneration he 
could make out of it. In other words, why 
cannot somebody devise a system of ventila- 
tion that will be accepted at once as feasible, 
and thus put a stop to complaints on this sub- 
ject? 



Percolation of Gases. 

Much has been accomplished by the re- 
searches of Graham and others, bnt still there 
is much more yet to be learned concerning the 
laws regulating tho passage of gases through, 
both porous substances, and membranes, and 
even through the dense medium of iron. 

Mr. Andaell, of the British Royal Mint, who 
has been experimenting upon the gases of 
mines, with a view to discover a satisfactory 
method of detecting explosivo compounds, has 
just observed a phenomenon which must be of 
interest to all physicists. He has discovered 
that some gases will travel with rapidity 
through biscuit-ware and not through india- 
rubber, and conversely that others will pass 
readily through india-rubber, but not through 
biscuit- ware. Mr. Andsoll has found that if a 
glass cylinder be intercepted at its middle by a 
plate of biscuit-ware securely cementod in, and 
that then one end of the oylinder be covered 
with a thin sheet of india-rubber, and defusion 
allowed to proceed through the lattor, the gas 
(especially coal gas) which has passed through 
the india-rubber, remains between that sub- 
stance and the biscuit-ware, exerting consider- 
able force, although the other end of the cylin- 
der be perfectly open to the atmosphere. The 
explanation of this phenomenon, Mr. Andsell 
believeB, is to be sought in the existence of two 
forms of the same gas which possess entirely 
opposite permeating powers. 

M. Henri St. Clair, has also reported the fol- 
owing interesting experiment observed during 
his researches on the penetrability of iron by 



In a previous paper, this chemist had shown 
that hydrogen contained in an iron tube will 
ooze through its pores if heat be applied, a fact 
easily explained by the expansion of the metal 
consequent upon an increase of temperature. 
In the present case, M. Deville introduced an 
iron tube into a porcelain one, so as to form an 
empty cylindrical space between the two 
closed at both ends. He then filled both inner 
and outer spaces with nitrogen, and heated the 
apparatus, after which he caused hydrogen to 
pass into the annular space, taking care to 
measure the pressure, which soon became dou- 
bled in the iron tube. On analyzing the gas 
contained in the latter, he found it to consist 
of hydrogen and nitrogen, the former being in 
by far greater quantity than the latter, besides 
a little oxide of carbon. This shows that the 
hydrogen had penetrated through the tube. 

Departure of Plants from their Originax 
Types. — Few people have a clear idea of how 
widely 60me plants have departed from their 
original types. New races of plants come into 
existence which are so different from the plants 
from which they sprung that, if found in a 
wild state, no botanist would hesitate a mo- 
ment to place them in different genera. The 
cauliflower and cabbage, for instance, have all 
"progressed" from the same original, which is 
a coarse weed wild on the chalk hills along the 
seacoast of Europe, and so unlike the cabbage 
and the cauliflower that no one would suspect 
it to be the parent of either of them. These 
facts have been seized upon by some evolution- 
ists as favoring their theory. But, without re- 
gard here to our own opinion on the truth of 
evolutionary views, as generally held, and with 
a sole view to truth as science presents it to us, 
we think these facts do not aid these views 
very much; for, different as these two kinds of 
plants are from the wild type, they themselves 
show no disposition to go any further. The 
wild plant brought forth a cabbage and a cauli- 
flower, but the cabbage and cauliflower show 
no disposition to produce other distinct things, 
but rather, to bring forth closely after their 
own kind— simply continuing to improve by 
cultivation, but always within their own speci- 
fic sphere. 

Saponification. — At a recent meeting of the 
Paris Academy of Sciences, M. Pelouze read a 
paper on the saponification of fatty substances 
by alkaline sulphurets. Tallow and oils con- 
tain fatty acids combined with glycerine, and 
the elimination of the latter constitutes saponi- 
fication. If effected by certain metallic oxides 
— soda and potash, the compound thus ob- 
tained is called soap; and hence the substance 
known under that name consists of a fatty acid 
combined with potash of soda, and deprived of 
glycerine. Many years ago, M. Pelouze, after 
discovering that alkaline salts could produce 
soap without the intervention of water, found 
that akaline sulphurets possessed a similar 
property. Having taken up these experiments 
again, he prepared some crystals of mono-sul- 
phuret of sodium, and mixed them with their 
weight of tallow or oil. After a contact of sev- 
eral days, the fatty matter was found com- 
pletely saponified. By boiling this soap in 
water, hydrosulphuric acid is evolved, and, if 
this operation be continued, the mono-sul- 
phuret of sodium is reconstituted. 



S< iKvrrFic Pbizk-Award.— The Academy of 
Sciences, at Paris, have awarded their purse of 
$10,000 to Mr. Gramme, for his electro-mag- 
netic machine, which is one of the simplest 
and most efficient that has yet been invented. 
The construction is so free from complications 
that the instrument will work and give a con- 
tinuous current for months together, and to 
those who know anything of the subject, these 
will appear as results of the highest import- 
ance. One of the uses to which this machine 
may be immediately applied is the production 
of a light of intense urilliancy, which will be 
seen farther than any other electric light yet 
known. One of the French steamship com- 
panies is about to use this light on their ves- 
sels as a precaution against collisions or other 
casualties, and it is obvious it can be made of 
great general utility. 



ECHANICAL l?ROGRESS 

1 t^ 



The painful effect of artificial light upon the 
eyes is attributed by recent investigators to the 
great proportion of non-luminous rays, or rays 
of mere caloric bearing no illumination, which 
it contains. In sunlight there are 50 per cent. 
of such rays, in gaslight nearly 90, in electric 
80, in kerosene light 94. A German chemist 
named Landsberg has discovered that by pass- 
ing any kind of artificial light through a thin 
layer of alum or mica, these caloric rays are 
absorbed, while the illuminating power of the 
light rays is undiminished, and becomes ex- 
ceedingly mild and pleasant to the eyes. 



A Valuable Invention— Enameled Brick. 

We have already made some allusion to the 
recent invention by Mr. Clark of Connecticut, 
of a process for preparing an enameled brick 
for building purposes. It seems that a large 
company has recently been organized in Phil- 
idelphia for the purpose of manufacture. The 
American Manufacturer, in speaking of this new 
article of manufacture, says: The process of 
enameling or glazing pottery and procelain has 
long been known, and even bricks have been 
glazed by what is known as the salt process; 
but the glazing is too perishable to be exten- 
sively used. There has also been another dif- 
ficulty in all previous processes of enameling. 
Litharge, or the protoxide of lead, has always 
been used; so essential has this been deemed 
that it is asserted that it is impossible to pro- 
duce an enamel without its use. 

Mr, Clark has, however, succeeded in rind- 
ing a substitute for lead, and has thus avoided 
the cracking or "crazing" to which all enamels 
of which litharge is a component, is liable. 

The minerals used for the enamel are feld- 
spar, flint, China clay, fluorspar, and the sub- 
stitute for lead. These are melted together, 
and upon cooling are broken into bits looking 
like flints in size and fracture. These are then 
ground to a powder under Frenoh burrs, so 
exceedingly fine that it feels to the touch of 
the finger like the best quality of flour, and as 
a liquid it flows through a net containing 10,- 
000 meshes to the square inch. This powder 
is placed in a suitable vessel and mixed with 
water until it assumes the consistency of the 
thin "skim" used by plasterers. It is natural- 
ly white, but almost any color that can be pro- 
duced in painting can be had by adding the 
necessary material. When the enamel has 
been thus prepared, it is ready for application 
by simply dipping the face of the brick into it. 
The paste readily adheres, the spongy quality 
of the bricks drawing it into the pores, and 
giving it a firm grip as it hardens. The brick, 
as soon as dipped, and while the enamel is 
still in a soft state, are plaoed in square boxes 
made of fire clay, face side up, and conveyed 
to a heating kiln, where they are subjected to 
a heat ranging between fourteen hundred and 
seventeen hundred degrees Fahrenheit, accord- 
ing to the quantity of the flint in the enamel. 
The heat fuses the preparation, and the brick 
being in an exactly upright position, the enam- 
el settles evenly on the face, and is ready to 
be removed and cooled for use. 

The advantages of this invention are numer- 
ous. The brick presents a most beautiful face, 
smooth, hard, polished, and, a3 shown by a 
series of the severest chemical and mechani- 
cal tests, almost indestructible. Heat and 
cold are alike powerless to affect the enamel; 
a blow sufficient to drive a nail into wood pro- 
duces not the slightest crack or flaw. Acids or 
other corrosive liquids do not attack it. 

The company have received an order from 
the Building Commitee of the Centennial Com- 
mission at Philadelphia, for 200,000 of these 
bricks, which they intend using in the con- 
struction of some of their buildings, 

A prominent railroad official designs using 
these bricks for lining the inside walls of some 
of the machine shops of the company, as a 
matter of economy in light — the shops being 
so dark as to require the almost constant use 
of gas in the winter months. The pure white 
enamel, for this purpose, would constitute an 
excellent reflector, and would render shops as 
light as a parlor painted in white. 

It is invaluable in building bank vaults, 
foundations, or in any situation where abso- 
lute freedom from dampness is necessary. 
The great advantage is their cheapness. They 
can be delivered at sixty dollars per thousand, 
when the ordinary brick cost forty dollars. 
Philadelphia pressed brick are worth sixty dol- 
lars per thousand exclusive of the cost of deliv- 
ery, and an ordinary three story front can be 
put up withthese elegantly colored bricks at 
about one hundred dollars less than the cost 
of the Philidelphia brand. The enameled 
bricks nre larger than the ordinary makes, which 
is also an item in their favor. 

It is of course understood that it is not to 
the manufacture of brick alone that this enam- 
el is adapted. There is no use to which por- 
celain has been put that this iB not applicable. 
For enameling stove fronts, kettels, etc., it is 
unsurpassed. We also imagine that in the 
chemical arts it must be invaluable. In acid 
manufacture where a substance free from the 
influence of corrosion is absolutely needed, 
this must be employed. 



Progress in the Manufacture of Mirrors. 

In the year 1782, the price in Europe of a 
mirror of ten square feet, amounted to 265 
francs, 5.35 francs being equal to one gold dollar. 
In 1805, the price of a mirror of the same size 
was 225 francs, and two years ago it only 
amounted to one-fifth of this sum, or 45 francs. 
But the differences in price are still greater for 
the large mirrors. From the year 1805 to the 
year 1865. the price of a mirror of forty square 
feet went down from 400 francs to 262 francs. 
In 1688, it was not considered possible to cast 
a mirror containing eighteen square feet; but 
five years later, Lucas, in Nehou, succeeded 
in casting plates containing thirty feet; and in 
1834, Saint Gobin exhibited a plate of one hun- 
dred square feet. In 1849, he produced one 
containing one hundred and thirty feet; at the 
first London Exhibition, one of one hundred 
and forty-two; at tho first Paris Exhibition, 
one of one hundred and eighty-three; and at 
the last International Exhibition, one of two 
hundred and twenty square feet. This last 
mirror is the largest ever oast with the contents 
of a single pot. In the year 1862, the Belgian 
establishment of Sainte-Varin d'Oignies ex- 
hibited in London a plate of a size exceeding 
the last mentioned by twenty-six square feet, 
but, this mirror being cast with the contents 
of two pots, it showed marks which were pro- 
duced by the line of contact of the two 
streams. 

Vabious Qualities of Ibon.— It is a well 
known fact, that there is a great variety in 
quality and character of pig, bloom and oast 
iron. When iron has passed into the form of 
steel, the same great differencies exist in 
quality. The reason is easily defined and un- 
derstood by the iron worker. That iron is 
ever found pure, or made bo by any change 
yet known, we do not believe. It is metal of 
various elements, and when a certain portion 
of each one predominates, the variation from 
the one not holding the same is at onoe noted. 

The existence of an undue proportion of 
phosphoric acid, can be at once detected; for 
it imparts to the mass a great degree of brittle- 
ness and shortness. The existence of carbon 
in small or large proportion gives to iron 
many changes; and it is remarkable how little 
of this carbon is required to produce steel 
from iron. 

It is curious to witness the changes pro- 
duced by the variations of quality of carbon 
from one to six per cent, in the changes of 
this metal from pig iron to other conditions. 
It is wonderful to observe the entire difference 
in the quality of pig iron by careful analysis. 
The various proportions ef silica, lime, alumi- 
na, magnesia, manganese, sulphur, phospho- 
rus, titantic acid, or other substances though 
principally or partially destroyed by the pro- 
cess of change, leaves their marked influence 
upon the metal ever after. — Ex. 

Anotheb Answer. — Mr. A. E. Holley gives a 
very sensible answer to the much disoussed 
question, " What is Steel," in the following 
language: " Steel is an alloy of iron that is 
cast while in a fluid state into a malleable 
ingot. Any radical nomenclature founded on 
chemical differences leads to endless mistake 
and confusion. If steel is defined as an alloy 
of iron containing carbon enough to harden it 
when it is heated and plunged into water, then 
puddled iron, although laminated and 
heterogeneous in structure, may not be steel, 
and the finest product of the crucible, 
although crystalline and homogeneous in struc- 
ture, may not be steel. The fundamental and 
essential difference between steel and all other 
compounds of iron is a structural difference, 
and it is always easily determined, while steel 
and wrought iron cannot always be distin- 
guished by chemical analysis. The same pro- 
portions of carbon, manganese, silicon and 
other elements may exist in and similarly 
effect any malleable alloy of iron. Steel is, 
therefore, an alloy of Iron which is cast into 
a malleable mass." 



Raising Steam by Solae Heat. — Several in- 
ventors in different countries are attempting 
to utilize the heat of the sun's rays, and to con- 
struct a sun engine. Many people shake their 
head at this idea and ridicule the very idea of 
success. But they are certainly unacquainted 
with the stupendous force at disposal. To con- 
vert one pound of water from zero to steam re- 
quires 637 centigrade units of heat. The re- 
searches of men of science have proved that 
every square centimeter of the earth's surface 
receives not less than 231,675 centigrade units 
of the sun's heat annually. Forty per cent, of 
this is absorbed by the surrounding atmos- 
phere, and sixty per cent, reaches the earth. 
This gives seven centigrade units received per 
second on each centimeter, so that ninety-one 
square feet of the earth's surface would receive 
heat enough every second for the vaporization 
of one pound of water. 

Device fob Incbeasing the Flow of Wblls. 
M. Bonnet, a French engineer, has discovered 
a method of increasing the flow of wells, by 
closing the mouth as perfectly as possible, by 
means of a sheet-iron bell, through the top of 
whioh the tube passes which is attached to the 
pump. When the pump is worked, if more 
water is withdrawn from the well than natur- 
ally flows into it, the water-level is lowered, 
and a diminution of pressure is produced on 
the surface ; this causes an increased supply 
of water to come in from the springs which feed 
the well, and the total delivery of the well is 
permanently increased. 



4 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5, 1873. 



Showing Highest and Lowest Prices of Mining Stocks on the Board List of the S. F. Stock and Ex. Board, during the Last Twelve Months, and during Four 

Weeks, together with Number of Feet, Shares, Last Dividends and Assessments. 







it 

h 


b 

H 

3 > 


ft 




1873. 


1872. 


1873 




WEEK ENBIBie 


j-cxrs. ADS. 


SEPT. OCT. 


srov. 


SEC. 


JAX. 


FEB. MA It A1»K. 


MAY. 


JUKE. 


jV A M E OP COMPAK1 


June 11 


June 18 


lane 25 


July US 


a p 

" 

1! • 
8- " 


s z 




b r 
1 1 


b r 

n » 


B t 


b r 

1 1 


B ? 

* i 

' i 


B P 

n n 
m v 


B P 
• 1 


B P 
* t 


B P 
s. » 


9 = 


n p 

£ 4 


i I 


1 « 


WASHOE. 

Alamo Gold and Silver M . Oo 

Alpha Consolidated 

Alts., -.;.. 

American Flat. .-.. 










1 * 

35 27 

"Hi "ix 

7 2 
3 3 
9X 7X 
111 B4 
6)4 4 

"i" "i« 
'26" 'is" 

6 6 

6 sx 

75 61 

9 7 

2X 2 

102 90 

135 116,'£ 

IX 1 


75c 75c 
31 27 

"iii "Hi 

4 2% 

134 3 
IIX 8)6 
90)4 86 

434 334 

ai ix 

ism 'n>a 

..... ..J.. 

64X 51 
7)8 7M 
3 VA 

95 SB 

ma 97 
1 X 


75o 75c 
32 29 

'8M "iii 
2»J VA 

\VA BK 
97 88 
4?.( 4M 

'm "VA 
19" 'i6J( 
'W "hi<4 

59K 53 
7i! 7 
2 2 

97 92 

16 107 
1 50c 


75c 75c 
31 28 

'6ji "m 

25J Hi 
3 1 
10 8U 
03 92)4 
4« 4)4 

17)i iik 
'Hi "i% 

51 53 
7 6M 

110 98 

mii 166 

VA IM 














334 '3 

48 33 

'"a ""% 

3 lUi 
8 8 
2» lli 
i)6X 69)4 
534 5 

"iii "Hi 
'29" '26" 

6X 6 

'S" 'iti" 
11 IX 


454 SX 
44 38 

"M '"» 
3X IX 

6 6 
2)4 134 

90 76 
57a 5M 

"1% "i" 

29" 'Si" 

7 6X 

60" '48" 
13X 9 


5)4 5 
»0 20 

"2X "ix 


3X IX 
29X 20 

'iU ""% 

4 174 


9 i 

50 25 

i6« "i" 

VM 3« 

5 3 
23X 3>4 
04 71 

7 4 

8 5 

3 IX 
25 17X 
32 17X 

6 4 

6 4X 
81 48 
11)4 8X 

4X 3 
94 65X 

IX X 
145 116 

3X 90c 

10 SX 
10)4 534 
20 S'A 
3 1 

5 IX 
5 2 
20 9X 
65 42 
10% 534 
474 2X 

"b" "3J4 
15 6)4 
15 8X 
10 4 


1 34 


300 

3600 

'i960 

65 

'ioio 
224 
20 

'2566 

5060 
150 
100 

2800 
130 

D1 'j 
1160 
1600 

600 

20011 

1200 

70 

"5 

400 
3000 


6000 

66666 



: t 

54000 

01000 

2.! urn 
5000 
16000 
2.211110 
2000O 
10X60 
20000 
281)00 
24300 
20000 
23600 



"0 

21 ' 

2211110 
25000 
.501100 
8000 
12000 

26006 

isiiini 
16000 
00000 

36666 

30000 
2,1122 
300011 
21000 

36000 

220(2) 
J0000 
OlilHID 
10000 
16800 

1.2 

2 2122 
30000 

'. HI 

16000 
6400 
10000 
21011(1 

2,132:, 
1.10110 

24000 

2221,11 
21001.1 

50 
33000 
:■« 

2 1 

■221100 
24000 


27," July,' Hi 


5, Moh. 1, "ii 

i,"May"l7J"'73 

6, June 16, '73 

3, June 3, '73 

8, Feb. 7, "ii 

7,"jan."2i"73 
45, Aug. 6, '72 

4, Feb. 5, '73 

4"FeK'i3,"'73 
10, Mar. 18, '73 

i5,'ju'n'eii"'73 
1, Sept. 4, '72 
6, May 28, '73 1 
6, May 28 '73 


m 27 
"vk. 86c' 

95 20 
VA VA 
1100 108 
8 7 

14 6 
4 3 

■76" '36" 

11 6 

126" 162" 

15 5)4 
7M 2)4 

45 21 

172 342 
2JJ 1« 
7 5 

\£4 * 


66 35 

'5" 90o" 
81 50 


47>4 33 

'i« "i» 

1 90 75c 
50 50 


60 32X 

'2K "iti 

60 60 

334 ia 

18 t 75 

6X 6 

15 14 

3 2 

iix '19" 

10 8 

72"" 56'" 
15 9X 
6X 4X 
75 49 


58 44 

'334 "Ui 

65 9 
3 134 

19 93X 
8)4 6 

'23i "'76 

36" '25" 
9 4 

17'" '60" 
14 IIX 
6X 6 
86 43 


50 37 

"j" "ix 

'23s "ix 
07 six 

6)4 5 
"5" "23a 

2934 '26)4 
7 7 

77" "ii" 

1234 10 

5 5 
66 42 
10c 10c 

110 87 
76c fcOc 

10 9 
934 6X 
16X 14 

"6)4 'i't'c 
210 153 
91 66 
1034 7 

"iii "i" 

«» 234 
170 135 

6 634 

P if 

54 34 
79 55 
IX 6X0 
25c 25c 


35 27 

■iji "« 

834 3 
12X Vi 


Bacon Mill and Mining Oo... 


'?< 34 
86X 60 
534 2X 
..... ..... 

18 15 
23 12X 
6 4X 

4i« 3 P 
11 634 

3.X IX 
62 35 


4X M 
90 65 
4 3 

'ix '"fli 

20 12 
18X 9!4 

6 2.X 
2 134 

56 39 
10 S 

434 IX 
69 43 

6O0 40c 
121)4 89 

50o 20c 

9X 7 
6fi 1 
10$ 7 

"iii "2" 
'iox "7X 

56 .71'.. 
7M 5 
i'A 3A 

"ffi "'".i 

7 3 
83! 6 
434 % 


Baltimore Consolidated 


16, June, '73 

39,' 'Feb!, '72 
6, May, '65 

31,' June',' '73 
I, July, '63 


32 100 
7 6)4 
16 13)| 

3« m 

72" '35)4 
12 11 

'99' 62" 

13)4 VA 

8X 5 

44 21 

' 1 80c 

146 108 

2« 1)4 

19)4 10 
!7Ji 8 
23 14 

"j" "i% 

181 125 
89 55 
13)4 7K 

"s" "iH 

16)4; 9 

300 240 
9)4: 6 


14 85 
S'A 634 

"2% "2% 

48" '28)s 

11 VA 

iiii "a" 
ir va 

5 6 
75 23)4 
50c 500 
143 102 
134 1 

13 10 
11X 5 
18 13 

"2" '50c' 

266 165 

80 20 

10)4 6 

"6)4 "0" 

12 7 
260 200 

VA 4 

9 4)4 
3 1)4 

78 31 
75 75 
VA 90c 

75c 75c 


11 84 

S'A 334 

"j" "iii 

ib" 'i6X 
6 6 
6X 5. 

75 61 
9 7 


Best* Belcher 

Bowers 

Buckeye 

Bullion . . . ■'■ . ■ ■ ■ • ■".- ■:•■•-,!'■ 
Caledonia Silver Mining Co. 


Central No. Two 

Ohollar-PotoBi. . . ... •:■.-.. 


Gone. Cold Hill . Quartz 


55 40X 
30c 30c 
95X B4 
3S K 

10X 7X 
834 5 
17X 10 

"3X "134 
ISO', 12 
92X 77 
9 5)4 
..... .„.. 

6 3X 
9 6)4 
11 634 
534 334 

"2)4 "2" 
2 2 
2 1)4 
2 134 
53 33 
70 41 

20c 20c 


66 49 


10 88 


Cook A Geyer.. .... - - . - ... .- . 

Grown Point Gold and S. M. 


128 75 
2 1 

123« 9 
1034 6 
20)4 12X 

"134 '25c' 
200 133 
88 68 
1134 5M 

"734 "»" 
8)4 5 

280 200 
6 4 

7)4 3)4 
IX IX 
76 50 
95 46 
1 60c 


131 102 
IX h 

ll'A 934 
10)4 BSi 
2l'A 16 

"2X '«' 
250 193 

96 75 

12)4 9M 

"Hi "3)4 
934 7 

230 190 
6)4 4X 

7X 4 
2X 136 
6374 49X 
82X 70 
VA 550 


106 96 
65c 45c 

BX i'A 
Ib'A 13 

"j" -j-' 

234 W 
155S 14 
90X 81X 
8« 634 
...... ..„. 

834 7 
12 10 
5 4 


i04 83 
750 40 

9X 5 

12 7 

"i)4 "'34 

14)4 634 
81 32 
734 4SH 

"5)4 "lit 

1034 7)4 
4 1-54 


35 97 

IX X 


Dardanelles 






6U 6 

5?J sx 
13 10 

"i" "ix 
4 1 

17)4 1254 
57« 42X 

v4 m 

3M 134 
"ix "ifi 

llg 7X 
12)4 935 
ITS 3 

IX VA 
2 IX 

ix x 

4X i% 

47X 36 
55 32X 


6K b'A 
531 4?4 
10)| 10 

"iii "\k 

l>f. 1 
15 MA 
45 38 
6!d 6 
2 VA 

"i% "i« 
VA 1 

12S? Ski 
3K 3% 

VA 1 


6 5« 
5« 5V| 
WM &A 

"2J( "2" 
iii Hi 
121| 11 
Jl 1 .. 40 
6^ 5K 

1 T 

UA 10« 
i% 3Jj 

VA 1 


6 6 
5 4)j 
&A 9 

111 "% 

i.u Va 

13 11)4 
45 40 
S'A b% 
2 2 

"m "V4 

WV 7)4 
I0K 9» 
4 3« 

1 1 


634 5 

574 4)4 
13 9 

'3" "ix 

4 1 


Empire Mill and Mining Co. 

Exchequer 

Flowery 

Franklin • 


21, May, '67 

36,"Oot.',"'76 
36, April, '71 
30, June, '68 


13, June 10,|'73 

9, June 26, '72 

2!' Jail'. "7, *73 
16, June 9, '73 
40, July 1, '73 
16, Apr. 8, '73 

i," May 5' "73 

14. June 9, '73 
6, June 24. '73 

10, Apr. 25, '73 
5, Moh. 24, '73 

1, May 6, '73 


19M 
37 

"3* 
220 
106 
16)4 
..„. 

23 
930 
11 


8 

..... 

166 
68 
4« 

li 

270 
4%j 


Gould * Curry Siiver Mining 


400 
184 

'2606 

2000 

3000 

95 

1200 

3600 
11*0 
3000 
3600 
800 
1400 
1200 
1200 
2000 


57X 38 


Imperial 

Indus 

Insurance . . . • ....... j. . • 

Julia Gold and Silver M. Co. 


VA 534 
3)4 IX 

ifil T 


Kentuok 

Knickerbocker 


32, Men., '70 


12)1 9)4 
434 3 




..... ..... 








"ix "i" 

2 1)4 


Mint Gold and SilverMinmg 








8X IX 
234 1 
5 234 
47 30 
66 32 
95o 35o 
1)4 70c 
3X IX 
160 69 
60X 32 

4 2 
234 34 

16)4 10 
32'4 14)4 
VA 'A 

5 234 

12 5 

4.X )ii 

Va ii 

2)4 70c 
5X 334 
95 68 


New York Consolidated 

Occidental -. 

Ophir Silver Mining Co..... 
Overman Silver Mining Uo. . 


i."Mcn'.',' ; 69 
22, Moh. '64 


4, May 31, '73 
1, Feb. 8, '73 
26, June 24, '73 


1M * 
4 3« 
37 31J4 
39>i 34 


VA i 
Hi 4 
34 29 
46 36 


iA 1. 

4 4 
34 30)4 
38)4 31.14 


IM 
2% 
56 

no 

iA 
250 


1 

VA 

31 
74 

IX 
25c 


5)4 7X 
2 1«4 
46 33 
87)4 «5 
l€ 1)4 
1)4- 75o 


IX 1)4 
1)4 X 
49 40 
64 52 

IX IX 


2 X 
34 » 
45 21 
56 22)4 


I'A 10c 

37)4 15 
36 17 


IX 34 
4X 334 
47X 29 
55 32X 






3, June 19, '73 
1, June 20, '73 
9, Apr. 5, '73 
14, July 20, '71 


40o 25c 
X A 
160 128 
51 40 


35o 25o 


35c 20c 


30c 30c 
50c 37c 
158 127 
55 50 

75 50 
101, 10 
20 Kit 

VA VA 

5 4« 
IX % 




1 J-4 
















34 ii 
160 UO 




800 
160 


52, June, '69 


147 110 
53 47)i 
1« 1« 

12 11 

22 18 
VA 40o 
2A .VA 


139 120 
55M iS'A 

11 !< 10J4 
20 19 
2 lki 

2'4 1« 

VA 75o 
750 50o 


226 130 


170 85 
126 75 

w iU 

7« 6 

"ig "iii 


153 84 
91 63 

134 550 
18 13 

2^ ! 
2 2 

2 134 

3 3'A 


113 79 
87 49 

IX 1 
1834 14 
934 6X 

3 VA 
3X 3 


UO 73 
90 70 

17 14)4 
9?4 13ii 
134 55o 
134 1 


S3 55 
80 57X 

1)4 1 
1534 12X 

834 7 
25o 25c 
75c 50c 


86X 50)4 
76X 50 

14X 9X 
8)4 5X 

00c Hoc 
3% 3 

io io 

IX 34 


83 56)4 
72 58 

1 40c 

15 IIX 

IIX 8X 

'34 40c 

iA 3X 


76 35 
60 27 

40o X 
12 874 
10 6 
85c 850 
334 IX 

2 2 


97 37X 
42 26 

1 1 

11 7X 
15 8 

3 2X 

9 5 






Segregated Caledonia 

Senator Silver Mining Co. . . 






11, Jan., '71 


8, June 24, '73 
36, April 17/71 
l.Deo. 24, '72 

5,"Nov.'26,"'72 


1 % 
14 12 
25 19 
1 1 
2X 2X 


120 
19 
50c 

5)4 

18 


82 

15' 2 

50c 
3« 

8 


14 10 


South Overman. ............. 

Succor Mill and Mining Co . . 


'7600 

20 
2200 
803 


2;"6ot,'"'71 


2 40c 

2X 134 


TMnr 






■ 1 Si 

"ix "m 

3'A IS 
84 66 


1 a 

"iii "iii 

3 28 
68 61 


VA, !£ 






3, June 13, '73 
2, May 6, '73 
1, Men. 12, '73 
15, Jan. 4, '73 


3 2)4 

4 3 


rr?'h 












2X lit 
3'A 134 
84 58 


Woodvillo Gold and S. M. . . . 


1400 
1200 




2K 2% 
66 58 


3'A 2'A 
61 61 


3'A 3 
153 108 


3)4 3 
119 76 


5X 3 
128 60 


8 5 
125 93 


6 4X 
101 50 


6 4 

77X 50 


6 4 
95 65 


4)4 D4 
86 51 


iii ix 

80 56)4 


25, Aug., '71 


160 


160 


NEVADA. 
Adams Hill ■■ 

Alps Silver Mining Co 

Amador Tunnel and Mining. 
American Flag Mill and M. . 


'"800 
"366 


50000 
30000 

'36666 
30000 




3, Deo. 23, '72 

4. May 6, '73 

1, June 4, '73 

2, June 3, '73 


X X 

i A 

7X 5 


"iii "i" 
"6" "i" 


"iii ' i" 

"b" "« 


..... ...^ 

"i" "iii 


3X 

iii 

"Hi 


2K 
2)4 

"is>4 


31 ?< 
iii i 

'iiii "ii" 


VA VA 
5 4 

'26" "iU 


IX 1)4 
6 4X 

'20" 'iiii 


6X 334 
..... ..„. 


75c 50c 
5 3X 

"ilU "i" 


X 30o 
3?b 234 
6 2X 
10)4 6,'t 
3 IX 
VA 434 

74 65c 
34 50c 
4,'4 3 
2 2 

2X IX 

1 a 

15 9 


X 35c 
3 134 
5 2 
9 8 
234 2 
5 434 
X X 
34 mo 
X 30c 
4)5 2!.1 

3 3" 

13g 9^ 


"2" '45o' 

3 2X 

8 5 

4X 3X 

X 'A 
250 9o 

4 2M 


'iii "'ii 

3 1'4 
674 S'A 
1 1 
4X S3k 
Z5o 25o 
15o 15c 

"3" "K 

55c 40c 


1)4 410 
2'A Hi 
634 2X 
13X 6 


X X 
IX 34 

i $ 






4>4 3Q 

45o 30o 

'4 y 

2 1)4 

20c lOo 

13it 1034 


4 3'i 
1 70o 
250 20o 

"iii "l" 
10c 10c 

13M 12 


VA 75c 

75o 30c 

"iii "iw 

15c 15c 
14)4 ma 


3A 3 
3 VA 
35c 35o 
10c 10c 
2A 2'A 
40c 15c 

12)4 W^i 


Ki 
3 

VA 

4'i 


6'A 
VA 

2 
4 


m 6 

3 2'A 
2'A 1 


iU iii 
3A >* 


6 434 

2 1 

IX IX 

3 2 
11)4 7 


S'A 4 
2X 134 
2 1 
i'A 2 
-'% 5 


5X 436 
134 8 c 
1)4 75o 

"5X "w 


7 4X 
3)4 ii 
1 35c 

one 25o 

3X IX 

90c 20c 




Bowery 

Chapman Mill and Mining.. 
Charter Oak Silver Mining.. 


'iooo 

iwOO 


30000 

300011 

2(3, 23 

. 

201(112 
2311)1)0 
25000 
50000 
12000 
3O00O 

30O00 

'66666 

40000 
30000 
50000 
50000 
30000 
30OOO 
30000 
15000 
30000 



30000 
60000 
20000 

60000 
32000 

'46660 

311000 
50000 
20000 
3.5001) 
40000 

'66666 
30000 




3, May 5, '73 

3, Moh. 4, '73 

1, Moh. 3, '73 

2, May 23, '73 

1, May 28, '73 

2, April 26, '73 

1, June 20, '72 

1, Jan. 27, '73 

4, May 10, '73 

6,"May"i'i,"'73 
4, Mch. 1, '73 

2. Deo. 12, '72 
6, June 25, '73 
1, Jan. 17, 73 

6, June 2, '73 
1, Aug. 26, '72 

2," 3u'.'2§! '73 

3. Sept. 15 '72 

4, June 19, '73 
1, Deo. 9, '72 

7, May 30, '70 


3 'A 
75c 20c 
25c 10c 


10 i% 


i6)4 iji 


Chief East Extension. 








6'i 

201, 


# 


3)4 2% 
2334 19 
13 ' 10 

"iiii 'ii% 

"in "iii 

va 1 


sji IX 

22g 18 
14 10 

'iix 'i2X 
"Sx "5" 

2« IX 
3 1J4 
70c 50c 

'660' '9Qc' 


134 50c 
23 17 
14 13 

'io" "iii 
"7« "iii 

F i 
70o 50c 

..... ..... 


i?s 'A 

23 17 


1 50c 
19 1134 
















Eureka Consolidated 


1666 

'3666 
1000 


5, June, '73 


IIX 9 


11)4 934 


25 10 


14X 10M 


Harper Silver Mining Co 

Hermes., 


"9" "i" 

"2" "ix 

6O0 .5(1,1 


"S" "i" 

"ik "2" 


"m "6" 

"4""3>» 
75c 60c 


"iik "iii 
"Hi "\ii 

87)4o 62)4c 


"454 "'i'A 

3 75c 


..... .j... 

"634 "2»i 
2V. 3S 
2'A 34 
53c 40c 

"i" '66c' 


iiii' io" 

'W'\ A 

1 lc 

40o 40c 

"6c' '66c' 


'A X 
1034 5 
)4 'A 
5 2X 

1)4 lc 
80c 30o 

8 6X 

X 10o 
19 1134 








10c 10c 
16 834 






7 3 


11 1 


17 6 


12!4 6 


Huhn A Hunt Silver Mining 


5X 4 
1 X 

IX 1 

65o 35o 
434 436 

"3X ""% 
Hi 2 


5 2 

80c 20o 
1 X 
50o 20c 

5X 3X 

"'74 TOo' 
i'A 334 


4X 234 
30o 25c 
40o 41 
250 10c 

4 4. 


3'A 134 
IX 34 


4 VA 














30o 25o 

'iiii ii ' 
4 4 

IM 1 
"i% "i« 

25o 20o 
50c 20c 
10X 9 
75o 50o 

3 m 

62X 57)4 
1)2 m 


'■A J* 

VA 2 

<3 m 

250 25c 
'» "l\H 

VA 1 

..... ..... 

20c 20o 
40o lOo 
Sii 8 
1 1 
S'-fi VA 

61 56 
iii 1 


30c 25c 
3?< 3« 
2g 2A 

'Hii 'an 

5 VA 

"i« "i" 

40o 25c 
35c 25o 
».■= 8« 
VA VA 
i 3H 

65 61 


25o 5c 
2)4 1 

62)4c 30o 
'23" '20)4 

7 4)4 

'ii'i "Hi 

50o 30c 
50c 20o 
9)4 8)4 

4)4 3H 

66 60 


1 75c 


85c 75c 

"i" '660 


75c^ 20o 
9 2X 

75o 35o 

30o 17XC 
25 li)/, 






.5000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
2100 
1000 

24023 
1200 

2000 
.800 

''•■iOO 
1000 

1006 

5000 




334 2 
5X 2X 






































16, June, '73 


22 13 
2)4 2'A 

"iii "i" 

1)4 40c 
5 3)4 

"i'X "i'A 


31 15X 
2'A 2 

2 m 

..... ..... 

2 Hi 

"2M "2" 


34)4 19)4 
2X Va 

3 IX 

5X 334 

Mc' 'io'c' 
334 2 


30 23)4 


27X 20 


26 17 

160 15c 
2 IX 

"m "Hi 

'50c 25c" 
4X 4X 


17 14)4 


15)4 10 


1574 10 


24)4 20)4 




2, Moh., '73 


IX IX 
..... ..„. 

5X i'A 

"35c "20c 
234 174 


2X 134 

"j" "j" 

"56c '35c' 
234 2 


15 15 

334 2'A 

"274 "Hi 

2" 60? 
11 10 

IX 1 

7X 2X 
4 4 
94 77 
1)4 34 


12X S',4 
2A lh 

"ijj "ix 

60c 30c 

74 40c 

11)4 9)4 

\$ ,? 
2X IX 

95 73). 
80o 550 


8X 5 
234 1 

"i« "k 

X V 

55o 40c 

9 534 

..... .... 

82 53X 
8O0 50c 


5 6 

7X 7 
2)4 34 

ii* » 
IX * 
H X 
6)4 5X 
1 1 
134 1 


5 3% 










Newark Silver Mining Co 

Paoifio Tunnel and Mining. . 
Page A Panaca Silver Mining 


4, Apr, 10', '73 

3," Feb'.' 3, "'73 
4. May 12, '73 
11, May 23, '73 

3, Fob. 21, '73 

4, May 16, '73 

3, May 6, '73 

2. April 3/73 

4, June 10, '73 
1, May 16. '73 

3, June 19, "73 

i," July" 16/72 
6, June 20, '73 
8,' April' 25/73 


2X 1 

"2)4 »ic' 
750 20c 
IX 40c 
13)4 8X 

3X i'H 






"ijj- "i" 


Phoenix 

Pioche Silver Mining Co 

Pioche West Extension 


3,' Aug'.',' ; 72 
22,' 'Feb., '73 


50c 10c 
10X 8 
1)4 50o 
4X 174 




158 134 


175 148 


181 151 
4 4 


160 12S 
6X S'A 


145 91 
7X 2X 


109 73 
3 54 




78 66 

34 )i 


72'. 51 
1,'a 30o 


66 56 

134 1 




















2 2 


2 2 


iii % 

18 8 

"iii "iii 


22 12 
"&"" "5)4 


12A 10 

"7)i "ex 


1 1 
12 12 

"iii "i" 






2X 2X 


2X 2X 


IX 30c 


50o 25c 

lOo 10c 

4 4 
3 34 






I80DO 
6900 

"l>66 


50000 
2.5000 

11 

35000 
20000 

'36660 




ii 'A 

"Hi "i" 




X M 




"■« "iii 


"m "iii 


1 750 

"2» "iii 






1 X 

"VA "l 
6 3 


















Spring Mountain Tunnel 

Word Beecher 

Washington and Creole 


"Hi "2X 


"i" "i" 


"ix T 

7X 63j 


"iii ""ii 


"i)4 "x 






3 276 








































Alpine 

Bellevue 

Calaveras Gold Mining Co.. 


1200 
8000 
3200 


12000 

21,1121 
2000(1 
24000 

20000 


4," Feb '"'73 
5, April, '73 


4, May 13, '73 
6, April 14, '73 
3, Feb. 12, '73 


"ix "ix 


"Hi "Hi 


iii "Hi 


"iii "4" 


"iii "iii 

6 6 


"iii "iii 


"3" "iii 


"iii "2" 


"3" "2)2 


..... ..... 


"2" T 


..... ..„ 


"iU "ix 








Cederborg Gold Mining Co.. 












9M 63) 
80 80 


7)4 4X 
76 75 


ox at 
75 75 


634 6 


5 4 


4X 4 






Dunderberg Mill and Mining 
El Dorado lnd. Quartz M. 
Eureka Gold Mining Co 

Independent Gold Mining.. 






























'1680 
1800 
1500 


'26666 

2 411(11 
2.5000 
I..., ., 
25000 


9," juiy,"'73 
l,"jniy."'72 


l"jiii'y" 20/72 
3, Apr. 2, '73 


'22" 'ii" 
"ix "i" 

"liii "6" 
it X 

10)3 7 
5 4 

10 6 
9X 6 
5 3 
2X h 

8O0 50o 

50c 450 

X X 

8,X 5 


"ii" 2l" 

"i" "i" 
'iijj "7" 

K a 

15k 10 
5M 5 
11« 9 
11 3% 
*U 3S( 
3 2 

1 1 

45o 40o 

"Hi "6M 


"iii "6" 


16" 'iii 


"liii "ii" 
"2" "i" 
1 1 


"ii" 'is" 
"iji "i" 


'ie" 'io" 

10c 10c 
1 50c 


"liii 'ii" 

55c 50c 


"li" 'io' 

55c lc 
80c 25o 


'ii" "iii 

10c 10c 


"a" iix 

M 'A 
3 1 
20 20 


26" ii' 

10c 7Xc 
2!« 1-4 


"ii' is' 

' 2X "'34 


'28" '23" 
'560' '560 


■■25" '26" 

"2X "i" 


'ii" ii" 
"ix "i" 


Oakvillc Quartz Mining Co.. 






..... ..... 


'ii" iix 


'i6,x "i" 


St. Lawrence Mill and M. Co. 








1, Moh. 11, '73 
6, Oct. 31, '72 
20, May 28, '73 
3. Juno 4, '73 

3, April 10, '73 
9, May 26, '73 
9, Moll. 25, '73 
9, June 11, '73 
6, May 21, '73 

6,"May'23,"'7.i 
1, Nov. 4, '72 

6, Jan. 9, '73 
12, Moh. 3, '73 
14, May 31, '73 
8. Oct. 9, '72 

1, Nov. 21/72 

1, Sept. 16, '72 
1, Nov. 12, '22 


VA 2 


1 1 


12X 12 


134 m 


5 5 

IX IX 












1800 
3000 
400 

750 
1300 

720 
1070 

"660 
1000 

100(1 
1600 
1000 
800 

2400 


20000 

11 

lOOOO 

25000 


1 1 

11,(131 

20001 

'2,1001 
10000 

2111101 

331,11, 
2 

2133: 
24000 

30000 
60000 


9, April, '72 




2 2 

9 M M 

8 3 

9 7X 
IX 65c 
3)4 3 

1 1 


X % 

134 1 
6 4 

j ¥ 

VA 1 
4)4 4 
IX 'A 






5)4 5 
,'a 34 






IX h 

6 IS 

5 IX 

7X 2 

2 a 

25c 10c 


40c 40c 
4.X 34 
3% U 
3 1 
6 134 
3X 3 

60c 40o 




Ida Ellmoro 

Mahogany G. and S. Mining. 
Minnesota Gold and Silver.. 

Red Jacket 

South Chariot 


IM IX 

6 4 

5)4 2)4 
19 4 
Sii Vi 
IX 80c 


18^ 7 M 

5)4 4 
1134 6 
11 6 
5 3 
3 54 


9, Moh., '71 
6, Feb., '70 
1, Aug., '72 


15 11 

6 iii 
10»j- 3A 
10!<! 8)4 
4 3A 
3 2 


18 14 
5)4 i% 
8 8 

11 10)4 
4 3)<S 
2Si 2M 


14 5 

20 12)4 
20 15 
2% 2 

"3% "Hi 

8 7 


12?i 9 
17 12)2 
31 1534 
2 1 


12 10 

15X 10X 
44X 19X 
1'4 50o 


20 9 
13 7 
30 2)4 
VA % 


17 11 

12 734 
27X 20 
HI 50c 


iix 6 

1334 9 
20 17 

134 50c 














10c 10c 
3» 60o 

"674 "Hi 








30c 25c 

"i" '4'0'c" 

1,0c 30o 
7X 4 




Mammoth Silver Mining Co 

Noonday 

Original Hidden Treasure."! 


i," June,' "'70 


50o 450 
30c 25c 
7K 7 
40c 40c 


45o 40c 
7 6 


2'A 1 
20c 10c 
3)4 3A 


50c 50c 
6ii 4M 


6O0 35c 
21o 21c 
6X 4M 


35c 350 
25c 250 
5,X i'A 


50c 25c 
35c 5c 
63a 3 


60c 313c 
60o 350 
5 4 


X40c 

"i" ' ix 


40o 30o 
"5)4 "i" 


45c 30c 
..... .... 


50c 40c" 
30o 25c 
3)4 5 
40c 40c 












s« 


334 IX 


3X 2 












"iii "i" 


"iii "iii 




"2X "2X 
7 4 


5 5 




Wellington 

" OKEGON. 






... 























1 '■" "" 







July 5, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



ASSESSMENTS, MEETINGS, DIVIDENDS. 



A Shareholders' Directory— Compiled Daily for the Mining Press. 
Note.— In the Stock Boards an uMsanent it delinquent thirty days from the date of levy, exclusive e 
hut date. The delinquent dates given in this list are those of the mining offices. 

ASSESSMENTS.— Stocks on the Lists of the Boards. 

Secretary. Place of Butlnete. 



Company, 

AmiilorToD-elM. Co. Elj Dl.trlct 

Alulne 0. M. * M. Co. Am.ilor.C.I. 
Alp. M.Uo. KlrDUIriol. 

AnT.ricAr, Kl.l M. Co. 1"*!\"* 

Artioo. A L'uh „ . 

Ibll'moraOon. M. Co. «..bo.-. 

UtnlU.C V, PLC" I-... I .. 

»o»«j Coo M. Co. El, Dl.lncl. 

Chl.f of 111. Hill M. Co. Elx Di.lrlct. 
ConMiltd»I«l Viric ol» M Co. W.hIiot. 

Etui Kllrn.ior. X. Oo. 
U»n.y 1j. * 8. Co. 
Kinuin- M A M. Ob. 
Dl..l» M. Co. 
Gould * o.m H. M. Co. 
OoWto OhETlol M. Of. 
Il.lo A Ni.rcr..«i 8 M. Co 
UahoA Hunt «. '- •■ 
M»yi-.U.*S. M.Oo. 1 
HennciK.Co. 
jalteO. A s, H.Oo. 
■Initio. M. Co. 
J«ck>on 1 M 1 .0. 
KontockyO AS. M Oo. 
KetituokjO. XCo. 
HAhoilAuyU Ah. M-f-o. 
McV.hnn 8. SI. Co. 
Minnmou M. Co. 
Now York IfOBA. M. Co. 
No niclav M. Co. 
OphlrM.Oo. 
O.orm.rj 8 M. Oo. 
PeiTlne M. Co. 
Phonlx 8 M. Co 
Plotou M. Oo. 
Piocho Pheulx M. Co. 
PlochB We.t Ex. 
Portland S. M.CO. 
Rock Maud Q. M.O. 
S.n.lorS.M. Co. 
Silver Wist Coo. M. Co 
HoulhChrlol M "" 



Location. No. Ami. Juried. Dclinq'nt. Sale. 
1 



Washoe. 

Ntr.d. 

NoiAda. 

Id. ho. 

Wa«hor. 

F.lv Di.lrlct 

[oMnflnu III-' 

El, Diitrlct. 

.NcvhiIa. 

Nevada. 

NWAdA. 

Ely 1 lilt 
Cal. 

I.l.llll. 

NcvAdA. 



W.ihoe. 

Wuhoo 
Ely District. 

Ni-vtd.. 

Ncvudu. 
Ely in in. i 
Ely District. 
Ely Dl.trlct. 

WttBUOC. 

Ameri<-»o Flat. 

Nevmda. 

Idaho. 

Nulnir Moiinluln Tunnel Co. Not. 

Sui.diird M. A M. Co. Ely Dl.trlct. 

sur Con. M. Co. NeTAdA. 

Tt-'cuitiien, O 4 a. M. Co. 
Utah B. M. Co. 

Conn. M. Co. 



VlrstnlnCon. M. Co. Inyo Go, Cal 
Yale Oi-wvel M. to. Placer Co . Cal 



Washoe. 

Washoe 

Inyo Co., Cal. 



1 00 Jane 4 

SI W Slav I) 

SO Slay 6 

SO May 17 

1 *i Jan. 3 

1 00 Jnse 16 

76 June 3 

•a Aj.nl 14 

50 May * 

50 May 23 

3 00 June 11 
20 May 38 

51 May 28 
1 00 Jure 10 

-5 July 2 

1 00 June- 9 

I 00 May 26 

5 00 Julyl 

1 SO May 12 

25 May 16 

S IK) May 10 

Ml June 9 

1 00 June 24 

10 June 23 

1 50 Jane 2 
20 June 23 

2 00 June 11 

25 June It) 

I 00 M..y'-'l 

50 Mull 

25 May 21 

5 00 June 24 

4 00 June 4 
25 Mav 12 
25 May 28 
20 June 19 

1 00 May 6 
50 May 16 
25 May 6 
50 June 20 
50 June 24 
75 June 10 
50 May 23 
20 June 20 

2 1)0 May 16 
10 June 19 
25 MHy28 

1 00 May fi 

25 June 13 

5 May 12 

20 June 4 



Jolv 10 
June 17 
June 11 
June 20 
July 9 
July 21 
JnlyH 
Hay 19 
June 16 
July 1 
Julv 16 
July 2 
July 1 
July 14 
Aug. 4 
July 14 
Jam- 30 
Aug 2 
June 18 
June 19 
June 16 
July 12 
Julv 29 
July 29 
J uiy A 
July 24 
Jolv 19 
July 25 
Jnne 27 
July 2 
June 27 
July 29 
JulyS 
June 11 
Jnly 3 
July 21 
June 19 
June 24 
June9 
July 2-1 
July 29 
July 17 
June 30 
July 29 
June 21 
July 24 
Julyl 
June 10 
July 17 
June 16 
July9 



Julv 30 

July 8 

July 5 

July 9 

Aug. 4 

Aug 12 

Julv :ti 

July 30 

July 8 

Julv 11 

Aug. 7 

July 30 

July 25 

Aug. 6 

Aug. 25 

Aug. 4 

July 21 

Aug 22 

July 16 

July 15 

July 14 

Julv 31 

Aug 19 

Aug 18 

Julv 26 

Aug 8 

Auk 4 

Aug. 19 

July 21 

July 51 

July 21 

Aug 18 

July 28 

July 12 

July 23 

Aug. 8 

July 11 

July 22 

July 15 

Aug. 12 

Auk 18 

Aug 12 

Jul. 21 

Aug IS 

July I 

Aug. 18 

July 19 

July 2 

Aug 4 

July 8 

July 29 



I.. Kaplan, Merchants' Ex. 

Joel F. Ligl'tDer. 438 California at 
C. F. Baioolm. 426 Montgomery at 



O. W. It. Km*. 
Ceo. R Spinney, 
jntwph Msgolre, 

D. F. Baglev, 
T. F. Oroniee. 
a E Elliott 

O. S. Neal. 
D. T. Boglcy, 
R Wegener, 
Geo. R. Spenney, 
'if". U. Kpinney, 
Joseph MaKUlre, 



411 California st 
320 Calilornlast 
419Californlast 
401 Caliioi-niast 
433 California st 
419 California et 
4l9Callloru)a st 
401 lalifornlast. 
414 California st 
320 California rt 
3201'alilorniant 
419Caifornia at 



A. K Durbrow.room22, Mini D .c* 
L. Kaplalu, Merchants' Exchan^o 
J. F. LiRhtner, 438 California st 
T, W. Culburn. Merohants' Exc'ng 
Geo. R Spinney. 320 California at 

B. B. Minor. 411.S California st 
A.Noel. Room 20, 419 California st. 
R. Wegener. 414 California st 

419 California st 



J. P. Cavallier. 
«.'.■". Fletcher, 

E. Mcl-addin. 
Geo R. Spinney. 
Wm. Willis. 

H. C. Kibbe. 
J. Maguire. 
J. Murk-, 
W. W. Stetson, 
C. F. Balcolm. 
Joseph MaKuire, 
S. Phillips. 
C. E. Elliott. 
T. W, Oolbum. 
B.J.Gray. 
W.E Dean. 
Henry Boyle, 

F. R. Bunker, 
J. L. Kini 



Grass V 

Express Bld'g 
320 Caltfornia|tJt 
4l6Califotaia st 
419 California st 
419 California si 
Merchant's Ex 
414 California sL 



408 California's! 

419 California si 

414 California st 

4381California st 

419 California st 

Stevenson's Bld'g 

36 Montgomery st. 

411 California st. 

M. Burlington, 37 N.|M. Exchange 

J. M. Lenzarder. 515 California st 



Geo. R Spinney. 
T J. Herrmann, 
W. E . Dean. 
J. M Bufflington 
T. B. Wlngard. 



320 California it 
418 Kearny st. 
419 California st 
Merchants' Ex 
316 California at 



W. H. Watson, 302 Montgomery st 



Other Companies (not on the Lists of the. Boards.) 



Atlantic A Pacific Con. M. Co. 
AnucU tituirtx M. Co. 
Auburn ti^M Ou. Placer Co., Cah 

Brown's Valley Cons. M. to. 
Buoni Vista Vinioultural Society, 4al. 
Hunker IIIH M. Co. Cal. 

OarolInsM-Oo. Ely District. 

Central I-und Co. Osi. 

Callfonilii Bw( NtWttr Co. Cal. 

(;"]erb.-r«FirHlN.Exr0.4S.M.Co.Ca. 
Central Coal M. Co. .„__,. ^*'- 
Central Polynes al/mdCo.Aavlgatore Is 
Clear Lake Water Works 
Daisv Uill H. M. Co. Grass Valley. 

Dutch Flut BliwGravelM. Co. 
East Idaho SI. Co. Cal 

Eclipse & Lee'i. M. Co. * aJ. 

Emerald Hill M. Co. n „ Utah. 

EntArrpri^e Gravel M. Co. Gras Valley. 
Eureka M. & Smelting Co. Eureka Her. 
Eliza M. A M. Co. Siskiyou Co., Cal. 

Ktiulti.ble Tunnel A: M. Co. 

Frettr Stone Co. Cal. 

Grace M. Co. M n Schell Creek 

Grass Vallev New M. Co. Cal. 

Greut Blue Orovel Bange. Cal. 

Greenville M. Co. Plumas Co .CaJ. 

Grand Duke Tunnel * M Co Ulah. 

Green Valley M. Co. PUoer Co., Cal. 

lfeckerdorn O. A-S. JH. Co. ml. 

Hualoe M. <fe M- Co. MaripoFa Co. 

Hirmiguera Mining Co. Lower Cal. 

Klncald Flut M. Co. „Cal. 

Lady Estea Tunnel A M. *'o. D tah. 

La Paz M. Co. Ely District. 

Lady E-nmaM.Oo. „ Cal. 

Moridha S. M. Co. Nevada. 

Manhattan Marble Co. Cal. 

Man.fleld G. M. Co. El Dorado Cal. 

Mazeppit 8. M. Co. El/ District 

Newton Booth Cm. Ely Disinct. 

Oineira Table Mountain M-Co.Cal. 

Orient S. M- Co. Ne St d t.' 

Phenix Tunnol A M. Co. Utah. 

Pioneer Cons. M. Co. Nevada. 

Potrero Laud Investment Co r, 1 -'*'- 

Plymouth Rock M. Co. « U ,t* h ' 

Prospect M. Co. Grass Va'le; 

R« K ent Cona M. Co. 

Blalns Star S. M. Co. 

Ruby Hill Tunnel Co. 

.Sanderson G. M. Co. 

Schuylkill Quartz M. Co. 

Stanislaus "Water Co. 

stanlaluus Water Co. 

Starr KJng M. Co. 

Santa Cruz Coal M. Co. 

South Emma M. Co. 



_ _jy. 

Utah. 

Idaho. 

Nevada. 

Cal. 

Cal. 

Cal. 

Cal. 

Nevada. 

Cal. 

Utah. 



Sacramento Valley Reclamation Co. OaL 
Stickle QuorizM.Co. Cot 

Schell Creek M. Co. Schell ^reck. 
Spring Moiint M. Co. Ely Distrlc 1. 

State of Maine M. Si, M. Cf». Cal. 
Summit M . Co. Amador Co., OaL 

Stevens Paclflo Smelting A •• r 
Table Mountain Alpha M. *.— ■--■. 
Victoria and Imperial T. A M. Co. Utah. 



S June 20 
35 1 50 March 4 
4 50 April 24 
1 50 June 27 

5 OO Jnne 12 
10 10 00 June 5 

1 20 June 30 

1 25 June 9 
10 OO May 26 

3 20 May 27 

2U 20 00 Jnne 10 

5 00 Slay 14 

5 00 Slay 24 

£ 50 June 12 

2 SO May 11 
1 5 June IS 
1 25 June 13 

25 June 24 
21 4 00 June 11 

1 2U June 4 

2 1 00 May 1 

2 10 May 5 

6 2 00 May 27 

1 10 June 20 

7 12 May 15 

3 10 June 12 

4 1 00 June 11 

2 10 May 16 

2 10 May 16 
25 June 9 

1 50 May 14 
7 3 00 May 6 

2 00 May 6 

3 5 June 11 
50 June 16 

5 30 June 25 
1 1 00 June 9 

1 00 June 23 

6 May8 

50 May 20 

50 May 7 

5 June 4 

10 Jnne 14 

10 July 2 

10 June 19 

70 00 June 11 

5 June 11 

4 June 6 
— May 2« 

1 00 May 16 
ID May 15 
15 June 20 
10 Jnne 7 
2 July 2 
2 June 3 
50 Jnne 10 

5 April 9 
25 June 11 

June 3 
1 00 May 24 
50 June 11 
10 April 10 
50 May 14 
5 May 23 
25 May 3 
20 June 4 
25 Feb. 3 
20 Jnly 1 



1 



12 



July 24 
Aprils 
June 3 
Aug 2 
Juty 15 
July 7 
Aug 8 

July 10 

June 30 

June 28 
July 15 

June 17 

June 25 
July IS 
June 14 

July 28 
July 19 
Augl 
July 10 

Jul s 8 
June 9 
July 1C 

June 30 
July 26 
June 16 
July 14 
July 16 

June 23 
June 21 
July 10 
June 28 
July 2 
June 9 
July 17 

July 21 
July 26 
July 15 
July 21 
June 16 
June 24 
June 14 



Auk. 6 
July 25 

July 14 
July 18 
July 7 
June 28 
June 23 
July 6 
Jnly 19 
July 10 
Aug. 10 
July 7 
July 14 
June 13 
July 21 
July IS 
June 30 
July 17 

June 27 
June 21 
July 2 
June 5 
July 7 
Mar. 10 
Aug 5 



Aug. 12 
July 16 
July 15 
Aug 25 
Aug. 4 
July 28 
Sept 4 
July 28 
July 22 
July 18 
Aug_5 



Jo 



ilyl2 

Aug. 2 

July 14 

Aug 16 

Aug. 11 

Aug 26 

Jnly 31 

Aug. 1 

July 30 

July 22 

July 21 

A uk 20 

July 1 

Aug. 5 

Aug. 4 

July 12 

Jnly 14 

July 28 

July 21 

Aug. 18 

July 2 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 15 

Aug 18 

Ang. 11 

Aug 11 

July8 

July 15 

Jnly 12 

July 28 

Aug. 11 

Aug. 15 

Auk 13 

Aug 4 

Aug 18 

July 21 

July 22 

July 14 

July IS 

Aug 4 

July 28 

Ang. 26 

July 28 

Aug. 4 

Julyl 

Ang 15 

Aug 12 

July 16 

Aug. 30 

JuVy.21 

July 18 

Jnly 21 

July 16 

July 24 

Julyl 

Aug 27 



A. Noel. 
Geo. Oongdon, 
R. Wegener. 
R. B. NoyeB. 
U. Selmer, 
0- H. Knox, 
C. E. Elliot, 
B. F. Haswelt. 
Louis Franconi, 
J. N. Webster, 
W. Hillealsss, 
J.J. Meauum. 
S. I. C. Swezey, 
H. Silvester, 
W M Helman 
P. H. Paynter, 
A. Treadwell, 
r\ Madge, 
M. McDonougb, 
T. P. Beach, 
T. F. Cronlae. 
O. S. Healy. 
R Wegener, 
W. H. Knight, 
**. Fletcher, 



419C<lifornia st 

408 California st 

414 California st 

■ill 1 .. California at 

409 Battery st. 

19 First st. 

419 Calif ornia st 

338 Montgomery Bt. 

314 California st 

506 Montgomery si 

457 8th st. Oakland. 

319 California st. 

3 Front st 

Grass Valley. 

401 Cal if. >rn ie ft 

Grata Valley 

411^0alifornia st 

Merchants' Ex 

GraBB Valley. 

217 Sanguine st. 

438 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

414 California st 

331 Mont, st 

Grass Valley. 



Wm. H. Watson, 302 Montgomery st. 
H. C. Klbbe, 419 California Bt. 

U. Kosminsky, 322 Sansome st. 

A. D. Carpenter. 605 Clay st 

L. Terme, 734 Montgomery st. 

J W Tripp. 408 California st 

J. H. Applegate. 729 Montgomery st 



R. II. Cornell. 
O. S: Healy. 
W.W.Hopkins. 

A. D. Carpenter, 
Geo. R. Spinney, 

D. M. Bokee, 
Wm Small. 
M. F. Game. 
L. Franconi. 
David wilder, 
Joseph Maguire, 
C. S. Healy. 
C. S. Neal, 

B. B. Minor, 
Jas. Mason , 
J. Jackson, 
W. L. Ustick, 
Wm. "Willis. 
Sam'l Bell, 
Wm. Stuart, 
W. E. Reed, 

C. O. Tripp. 
C, O. Tripp, 
L. Kaplan, 
L. Kaplan, 
HcnryBoyle, 
T. B. Wingard, 
R. Cosner, 

E. Wheaton, 
P. W. Van Winkle. 
T. W. Colburn. 
H. B.Congdon, 
Ceo. Davidson. 

J.M. Knight, 
W. L.Ufltlok. 
W. H. Watson, 



217 Sansome st 

Merchants' Ex 

41Ui California st 

605 Clay Bt 

320 California st. 

319 Pine st 

231 Kearny st 

320 Sansome Bt 

314 California st 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

IU« California st. 

422 California st. 

Grass Valley. 

438 California at 

419 California s 

Eureka, Nevada 

U3LiedesdorlTst 

Grass Valley. 

*2S Kearny st 

526 Kearny st. 

Merchants F.i. 

Merchants' Ex. 

Stevenson's Bidg 

318 California st 

606 Montgomery at 

401 Montgomery st 

304 California st 

419 California st 

306 Montgomery Bt 

347 Montgomery ?t 

320 Montgomery st 

433 California Bt. 

302 Montgomery Bt 



Our Weekly Stook Review. 

WkDKUDax EvK, July 3, 1873. 
The stock Market this week has evinced very little 
activity, the coming holidays occupying the public 
mind to an extent to lessen the amount of buBtness. 
The feature of the week was the rise la Savage. On 
Monday last It closed st flO.1, an advance of $30 over 
previous days' sales. Savage Is one of the most fluotu. 
sting Btocks on the list and has lost and made fortunes; 
for many an operator. Consolidated Virginia has also 
shown some activity this wcok but nothing like what 
occurred a few weeks Blnce, The market generally for 
the week has been uninteresting. 

The members of the Son Francisco Stock and Ex- 
change Board have appointed a "Trust Fund Commit- 
tee," to be elected annually, in whose hands $30,000 Is 
to be placed, to be loaned to members on usual securi. 
ties st current rates. It Is thought that the money will 
double Itself In two years and a half. From the fund 
created In this manner $10,000 is to be donated to the 
families of every member that dies. The experience of 
the Board hitherto hab been that they lose a member 
e very eighteen months, consequently. In three years 
they will loee two members, Involving two donations- 
aggregating $20,000; but the fund in that time will earn 
$30,000. Thus, If a member leaves a wife and child, or 
children, the $10,000 will go to the latter. If no chil. 
dren, to the wife; if unmarried he may designate the 
beneficiary. If he dies without family, and without 
naming a person to receive the donation, none will be 
made. If deaths should occur involving payments to 
an amount greater than the increase of the trust fund 
then & pro rata assessment will be promptly levied to 
meet the deficit. 

This is a very good move on the part of the brokers 
and besides being a convenience to them when alive, the 
Trust Fund will benefit their families in case of death. 
The whole amount— $30,000 — has already been taken up 
and the proceeds will go to the Life Insurance Fund. 
It is said that should this experiment prove successful 
the balance of the entire surplus— $70,000— belonging 
to the Board will be converted in the same way. 

As we go to press one day earlier than usual this week, 
on account of the holiday on the ith, our regular week- 
ly letter from the Comstock mines, did .not come to 
hand in time for insertion. 

On Friday last, the market was a little stronger than 
on the previous day; the feature, was the advance of 
Consolidated Virginia, which closed $12 ahead. 

On Saturday, the market was not very active and bus- 
iness was quiet. At the close, Chollar was $2 higher; 
Vellow Jacket, $3; Ophir, $3. Meadow Valley fell 
$1.50; Eureka Con., $1; Overman, $1; Savage, $3; Con. 
Virginia, $7. In other prices there was no material 
change. 

Mondays' sales were light, and fluctuations of little 
consequence. 

On Tuesday, the market was pretty strong, prices 
showing an advance. At close, Savage in particular, 
made a characteristic advance-$30, Belling at $163; Hale 
k Norcross, rose $3; Con. Virginia, $3; Gould & Curry, 
$1. The Eureka, Grass Valley mine, has declared a div- 
idend of $1, amounting to $20,000. 

Mining stocks were In fair demand to-day. The 
Board adjourned over until next TueBday and the whole 
list wsb called at the morning BesBion to-day. There 
was a further advance of $13 in Savage, which is doubt- 
less due to the pending election. Compared with the 
rates yesterday, Segregated Belcher advanced $3, Con- 
solidated Virginia, Golden Chariot and Yellow Jocket 
esch $2, Belcher, Eureka Consolidated, Gould & Curry, 
Justice, each $1. Crown Point and Raymond & Ely 
each declned $2, Bye Patch $1.60, and Newark $1. 



ining Summary. 



The following is mostly condensed from journal's pub 
ished in the interior.in proximity to the mines mentioned : 



Oregon. 
Ely DiBt 

S.F. 



Name of Co. Location. 

Auburn G. M. Oo. CaL 

Beckwlth M.Co. 
Belmont M. Co. 
Best & Belcher M. Oo. 
California Pacific R. R. CO. 
Chnlliir-Potosl M. Co. 
Central R. R. Co. 
Dardanelles M. Co. 
Eastport t'oos Bay Coal M. Co 
Kentucky M. Co. 
Kinslon M. Co 
Mission Bay Bridge Oo. 
Newark S. M. Co. 
OmnibuB R R. Co. 
Overman M. Oo. 
PocabontaB Q. M. Co. 
Rook Island, 
Sutro Tunnel, 
"63 "G. AS. M.Co. 
St. Lawrence M. & M. Co 
Savage M. Co. 

Tecum«eh G. S. A O. M. Co. 
Trench Gold Hill M. Oo. 
Union Cons. M. Oo. 
Utah S. M.Co. 
Washington M. Co. 
Washington A Creole M. Co. 



MEETINGS 

Secretary. 



TO 



BE HELD. 

Office in S ■ F. 



R Wegener, 
W.H.Watson, 
Nevada. O. H. Bogart, 
Washoe. Wm. Willis, 

Cal. E. H. Miller, Jr. 
Washoe. W. E. Dean, 
S. F. N. D. Arnot, Jr, 
J. L. King, 
J. L. Pool, 
J. P. Cavalller, 
L. Kaplan, 
J. L. Wilcutt, 
D. T. Bagley 



Cal 
Washoe. 

Washoe. 
Washoe. 
Arizona. 
Cal. 
Washoe. 

Washoe. 
Washoe. 
Washoe. 



414 California st. 

302 Montgomery st. 

Express Bld'g. 

419 California st. 

419 California st. 

, 116 Taylor Bt 

411 California st. 

Merchants' Ex. 

509 California st 

Merchants' Ex. 

New Mont A Market, 

401 California Bt. 



James O'Neil. Howard, bet. 3d A 4th. 
W . W. Stetson. 414 California at 

D. A Jennings, 401 California Bt 
W. E. Dean, 419 California st 
P, W. Ames, 321 California st 
J. Case, 306 Montgomery st 
W. I. KiP, Jr., 411}£ OalTf ornia St. 

E. B. Holmea, Cor. Cal. A Sanaome sto 



F. J. Berrm.inn, 
Jos. Marks, 
J. M. Buffi ngton 
W. E. Dean, 
T. B. Wingard. 
F. D. Oleary, 



jr. Clay A Kearny 
Merchants' Ex. 
Merchant's Ex. 
419 California at 
318 California st 
Merchants' Ex 



Meeting-. 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annnal 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Adjourned 
Adjourned 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annnal 
Annnal 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 



LATEST DIVIDENDS— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. 



Location. Secretary. Office In S. P. 

W. L. Oliver, 316 California at. 

B. Cornwall. Cor. Harrison A Spear. 



Black Bear Quartz M. Co. 
Black Diamond Coal Oo. California. 

Cederberg Q. M. Co. California D. M. Bokee. 

Con. Amador M. Co. Cal. F. B. Latham. 

Diana M. Co. N. O. Fasset. 

Eureka M. Co. Grass Valley, Cal. R.Wegener, 

Eastport Coos Bay Coal. Oregon. J. L. Pool. 

Eureka Consolidated M. Oo. Nevada. W. W. Traylor. 
Mahogany G. A S. M. Co. Idaho. E. McFadden. 

Monltor-BelmontM. Co. N.eyoda. B. B. Minor. 

Providence G. A S.M. Oo. J. M. Buffington. 

Rtiymo pd & Ely M ■ Co, Sly Diet , Nev. A. J Moulder 



420 Montgomery St 

402 Montgomery St 

220 Cloy St 

414 California at 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California at, 

402 Mont sTY, St. 

•111'.. California St. 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California St 



Amount. 

SO 
^percen 

1 00, 
1 00 
1 00 
5 00 
1 00 
1 50 

so 

1 00 
600 



Date, 

July 2 
July 7 

July 11 

July 14 
Ang 11 

July 14 
JulyS 
July 19 

July 15 
July 7 
July 2 
July 9 
July 7 



Julyl 
July 7 
July 9 
July 7 
July 14 
July 17 
July 17 
July 15 
July 21 
JulyS 
July 30 
July 10 



Payable 

June 13 

Mar. 10 

Feb. 6 

Apr. 1 

Jan . 20 

Julv,9 

Apr. 11 

June 25 

Aug. 7 

Mar. 15 

Nov. 11 

Feb. It) 



California. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Mosquito Disteiot. — Calaveras Chronicle, June 28: 
The main shaft In the Good Hope is now down 130 it. 
Sinking now. Vein of good size; contains excellent 
ore. 

Willett & Co. bought a portion of the Woodcock mine. 
Running tunnel on the vein. The Dolly Varden has 
pretty fair ore on dump. The vein averages over 5 ft. 
in thickness and presents better features than any other 
mine in the district. Shaft 100 ft. deep. San Bruno 
la driving tunnel. 

West Point Distkict.— The Pancho will probably 
change hands in a short time. Developments on the 
HarriB mine progress Blowly. The ore yields con- 
siderable over expenses. Lone Star working 5 or 6 
hands. The mine rates No. 1. Ohio Consolidated haul- 
ing and crushing ore. Running levels and transverse 
drift to tap the vein. The mine promises to exceed the 
most favorably expectations. S. HaskingB is opening 
a handsome vein near Skull Flat, The new saw mill of 
Wlckham & Co. is completed. Lumber can now be had 
at very reasonable rates. Business brisk. 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

Coppeb Mining.— Fresno .Expositor, June 25: In the 
vicinity of Buchanan Hollow, in this county, copper 
mining Beema to he increasing in prosperity. Three 
mines are now in operation near Green Mountain, from 
all of which excellent ores are. being extratced. The namsB 
of the mines are the Green Mine, Green Mountain and 
Lone Tree. The last of these is being oparated by J. M. 
Ault, Esq. We learn that he is taking out a considera- 
ble quantity of ore, much of which assays 35 per cent, 
copper. The ores from the mine are being smelted at 
the furnace erected by Mr. Harry DeGroot, on Green 
Mountain, and the regulns shipped to San FranciBco, 
where it sells for $525 per ton. The Green Mountain 
mine, worked by Harrey DeGroot, is yeilding splendid 
ore. A number of tons shipped last month brought 
$i00 per ton in San Francisco. The old Buchanan Cop. 
per Mine, which was started up about a year ago by 
James McMecham, Esq., is yielding more and better 
ore than ever before. It ranges from 16 to 35 per cent. 
About fifty tons of ore are Bhipped per month. Ten 
white men and fifteen Chinamen are now engaged about 
the mine, but the working force is to be doubled, and 
then shipments of ore wlU he proportionately increased. 
ELDORADO COUNTY. 

Offer yoa a PLAoenviLtE MrNE.— Mountain "Dem- 
ocrat," June 28: Edward Keegan, one of our pioneers, has 
a quartz ledge in the heart of this city. He has stripped 
the cropplngs of one enormous ledge and tunneled on 
another near by. A few days ago he was offered $10,000 
cash down, by responsible San Francisco capitalists, 
for his claim, bnt refused to take less than $17,000 for 
it. 
NEVADA COUNTY. 

Nevada Transcript, June 26: The Little York Gold 
Washing Company is the name adopted by the pur- 



obaeers of the property of the Little York Water and 
Gravel Mining Company. The new company is com. 
posed of English capitalists, and the property is a very 
excellent ouo. In addition to extensive gravel ranges, 
they have first water right for two ditches from Bear 
river, and the second right on Steep Hollow, giving 
them first-rate water privileges. They^ are now run* 
ning two sets of diggings by day, and supplying Dr. 
Alpln, who 1b running his claims night and day, and 
they have about 700 inches of water. We understand 
the prospects of the company are very encouraging. 

Moss Lxdoe. — Grass Valley rmon, July 29. — Ken- 
Bedy k Co. bavo been working for aome time on a ledge 
a Bhort distance from the N<rth Star mine. It was 
formerly known as the Muss Ledge, having been worked 
for a time, about the year 1850. by Colonel Muss, who 
left GraBB Valley and finally located in the gold mines 
of Nova Scotia, where hedied. Two satisfactory cniBh- 
ingB have been made from the rook taken out. They 
are down on the ledge about 150 ft., and the rock is 
looking better as they sink upon It, 

Strike.— It is rumored about the streets that a new 
and very rich strike in quartz has been made In this 
district within a few days. The parties In interest are 
not yet ready to give public information, but they in- 
form uBthat it is but a few minutes' work at any time to 
scratch out $10 or $16 worth of gold witb the fingers. 

The Entebpkibk Mine.— Nevada 7ran«mpr, June 28: 
The Enterprise Gravel mine is located in Buena Vista 
Slide, and the works are very complete. They have a 
10-stamp battery, pumping, and holBting- works, all in 
the most complete order. The incline is in three com- 
partments, and is down 1400 feet. All the way above 
the bottom of the incline they have gravel which pros- 
pects well, but they have not yet Btruck the main chan- 
nel for which they are running. We understand, how- 
ever, that the Enterprise has paid expenses all along, 
and tbe yield will, no doubt, be largely Increased when 
they reach the main channel, which is known to run 
along under the ridge which they are washing. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 

Mining Notes.— Plumas "National," June 28: Metcalf 
and Haycock on Gopher Hill have nearly finished their 
seasons' run of water. They have moved a large quan- 
tity of ground this sea6on, and will be well remunera- 
ted for their toll. Morris Smith k Co., whoso drifting 
claims are also on Gopher Hill, are doing well, and 
have been for some time. The Blackhawk Co. are 
cleaning up, and report says will make a good season's 
run. The Devil's Elbow Co. are working several men, 
with falrresuliB. Low water is unfavorable, as itaUows 
tailings to accumulate. The Hungarian Co. are not pip. 
ing at present, the Mill Creek water having been turned 
down the creek for the benefit of the farmers. The Su- 
perintendent, Mr. Goodwin, 1b working a few men, how- 
ever, and as usual, taking out lots of "kaleseed." The 
O'Neil Bros, have recently g> it some very favorable pros- 
pects in their drifting claims at Newtown, Judkina & 
Kingsbury, of Newtown, have nearly completed their 
preparat.ons, and will soon be taking out "pay grit." 
Bell etill continues to get some fine proBpectB from his 
quartz claim nearElizabethtown. Leavitt is working a 
claim in Betsy Gulch, near Elizabethtown, and is mak- 
good wages. Heath k Co., of Argentine are still piping 
and the indications are that they will make a huge 
clean up. This claim we consider one of the best in 
the country. Dean k Tefft are doing a large amount of 
work at the mouth of Squirrel Creek, and have good 
prospects. Swan, Webster & Co., are also at work on 
Squirrel Creek, but we are not posted as to the results. 
The water has been remarkably Bhort, and numerous 
claims have been idle. One or two good water seasons 
would develop a large number of claims, and make 
Plumas one of the formost mining counties in the 
State. 

SAN DIECO COUNTY. 

Weekly World, June 21, says: About one week ago 
tbe Messrs. Young, Worth and Sheard struck an exten- 
sion of the Golden Chariot, 6 miles south of that mine. 
The specimens from this ledge are of a very favorable 
character, and promises to equal the Golden Chariot in 
richness. 

The developments of the Tom Scott are good, and 
promises to exceed anything before discovered, perhaps 
with the exception of the Golden Chariot. A joint shaft 
with the Eureka, which it adjoins, 1b being sunk and is 
already down 100 feet. As soon as water is struck they 
will put on an engine. 

The Owen mine has let a contract to sink: 25 ft, at $30 
per ft., and the work is being pushed vigorously. 

Good rock has been Btruck in the Far West and the 
outlook is all that the owners could wish. 

In the Helvetia mine three shafts are being worked 
daily and a great deal cf rock is being taken out. 

The San Nicolas mine, in tbe San Rafael District, 
cleaned up after a crushing of 180 tons ot rook, netting 
$1,200. Owing to the failure of water supply crushing 
has been suspended on this rock as also that of the 
Pueblo, Zapata and other mineB. 

TULOUMNE COUNTY- 

T. M. Blue Geavei* Co.- -Independent, Jnne 28: Are 
turning out from 22 to 24 ounces of gold per day, and 
better prospects ahead. 

A Good Clam. — On Thursday of last week Haynee k 
Co., who own a claim in Parsons* Ranch, Columbia, 
eleanedup after a 100 days' run, and obtained thirty- 
four pounds of gold— about $7,650. 

Golden Gate.— A few tonB of rock from f his lode was 
run through an arastra at Brown's Flat, re . en tly , and 
under most discouraging circumstances, the machinery 
being out of order and mud water being used. The 
yield was over $10 per ton, even at that; 609 pounds 
of the same rock Bhipped below last week, and run 
through a mill, turned out $28.11 to the ton, the aver- 
age assay of pulp being $7.18. Sulphurets sent down at 
the same time, assayed $516.64 per ton. Mr. Long, the 
Superintendent, wishing to thouroughly test the vein, 
picked out parcels of the sulphurets — one in the slate, 
near the hanging wall, and one on foot wall, from 
neither of which anything was expected. The first, in 
the slate horse, where the lead is from 12 to 15 ft. in 
width, assayed $202.18 to the ton, and the highest assay 
had was on the foot wall in the breast of the tunnel, 
which went $2,461.35 to the ton, and getting richer as 
the miners work in. The shaft is now down to the tun- 
nel, which is in on the vein some 200 ft. below the sur- 
face. Tbe prospect ahead looks first-rate, better than 
ever. 

Pbobpectobs .—Union Democrat, June 28: Quite a 
number af persons during this month, have made trips 
into the mountains east of this place, for the purpose 
of finding silver-bearing leads. Large bodies of snow 
have prevented them from making anything lite satis- 
factory explorations. Tbe fact that silver-bearing ore 
was found last year in our county, makes many of the 
prospecting class uneasy, taxing their patience until 
such time as the snow will perm it of a thorough search. 
The parties that commenced opening a lead last fall, 
have made preparations to resume work, with sanguine 
expectations that it will develop into a paying mine. A 
number of assays made returned a handsome per cent, 
of silver. 

Nevada. 

ELY DISTRICT.! 

Amebioan Flag. — Pioche Record, June 22: The devel- 
opments in this mine at a depth of 625 ft,, still contin- 
ue to improve in character. The vein matter at this 
point is the full width of the shaft, the ore body being 
2 ft. wide. The stopes ore yielding tbe same amount of 
ore as heretofore. The mine is being prospected as rap 
icUy as possible. Ore 1b being Bhipped daily to the 
Amador mill, which is doing good work. 

P0BT8M0UTH.— The Portsmouth mine is situated be* 
tween the Alps and Montana, in a huge maBS of crop- 
ping-, the exact counterpart of those in which the 
main shafts of the Excelsior and LaPazmines are Bunk. 
A perpendicular shaft has been sunk to the depth of 72. 

(Continued on Page 12.) 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5, 1873. 



California in the Ninth Census. 

A correspondent of the Bulletin who has been 
extracting items of interest to Californians 
from the ninth census, writes as follows con- 
cerning the mines: The censuses of 1850 and 
1860 cannot be taken as a guide in determining 
the increase of manufactures in California, as 
in other States, because mining wasa chief el- 
ment of the account then, and it, with quarry- 
ing and the fisheries, are left ont of the census 
in 1870, though given separately in a form that 
the Commissioner of the Census himself pro- 
nounces utterly unreliable. The following ta- 
ble shows, including the mining and fishery 
statistics in 1850 and 1860, and leaving them 
out in 1870, the manufactured products of the 
State of California. 

1850 (including mining) 512,862,552 

I860 (including mining) 68.253,225 

1870 (exclusive of mining) 66,594,552 

In 1850 and 1860, the principal products of 
California were from the mines. The wheel- 
wright shops, where wagons were made and. 
repaired, and the flour mills, were then pro- 
ducing something considerable for those days, 
but nothing as compared to now. The vast 
other things that will be seen in a detailed ta- 
ble given below, have made California one "of 
the great manufacturing States of the Union. 
Her mining industries, leBS by far now than in 
1860, are stated (because no correct statement 
is obtained) leaving out the milled product, at 
a total of $8,281,623. 

Cinnaoar. 817,700 

Gold, hydraulic mined 1,622,993 

Gold, placer mined 2,646,174 

Gold quartz 3,096,666 

Gold and silver quartz 15,000 

Silver quartz - 83,100 

Conflicting Estimates. 
With regard to the productions of gold and 
silver, however, the thousand difficulties sur- 
rounding the ascertainment of anything like a 
correct statement regarding it, make it almost 
impossible to obtain one under a system oper- 
ated by the average census enumerator. Pro- 
fessor K. W. Raymond, Commissioner of Min- 
ing Statistics, gives for thfc year most nearly 
corresponding to the census year, the gold and 
silver product of the United States, mined and 
milled, as follows: 

California $22,500,000 

Nevada 14,000,000 

Oregon and Washington 3,000,000 

Idaho 7,000,000 

Montana 9,000,000 

Colorado and Wyoming 4,000,000 

New Mexico 600,000 

Arizona 1,000,000 

Allother Bources 500,000 

Total. $61,500,000 

The census for 1870, excluding the value 
added by milling, gives the gold and silver 
mining product proper at $26,452,652 as fol- 
lows. 

Hydraulic $2,508,531 

placer 7,266,613 

Quartz.' 16,677,508 

The Census Commissioner allows 45 per 
cent., as added by milling, and the result is 
that the two reports on gold and silver mining 
for the United States, including milling, stand: 

Professor Eaymond $61,500,080. 

Census Commissioner 33 ,959,531 

Commissioner Walker Defends His Statistics. 

Commissioner Walker defends his statistics 
for 1870 as against the seemingly great reduc- 
tion as compared with the census of 1860, by 
showing that in the latter census two-thirds or 
probably three-fourths of the amount of $24,- 
163,170 then reported as the gross product for 
gold mining, were based on estimates; that du- 
plicated production, resulting from the value 
of the gold or silver quartz being twice counted 
— once directly after being mined, and again 
after being milled, and even triplications of 
another class, that resulted from including the 
assay and refining of gold and silver, all the 
value thus reported having been included as 
bullion, and a portion of it having been twice 
reported; once as the value of ore, and once 
again as bullion, and third as assayed or re- 
fined metal. In 1860, 5,000 of 7,042 gold min- 
ing establishments were not returned to the 
census office, but were estimated for. The 
census of 1870 does not in this respect contain 
any estimates. For that reason the amounts 
seem surprisingly small. Taking into consid- 
eration the admissions made in both the eighth 
and ninth census reports, the belief is irresis- 
tible that bo far as gold and silver mining are 
concerned in the census, both of 1860 and 
1870, the statistics are so unreliable that the 
results attained are not only provoking to con- 
template, but are almost as bad as none at all. 
This fact should not, however, detract from 
the credibility of the entire census, because 
the statistics relating to population, mortality, 
manufactures, etc., are, as a rule, of inestima- 
ble value, the best the United States ever had, 
and reflect great credit upon the Commis- 
sioner. 

School Ship. — It is proposed to endeavor to 
secure the Flag Ship "California." recently 
condemned, and now lying in our harbor, as a 
"school ship" for boys who would otherwise 
be candidates for the Industrial school. She 
is admirably adapted for the purpose and it is 
to be hoped that efforts of the gentlemen who 
have the matter in hand will be successlul. 
This is the manner in which old ships are dis- 
posed of in England and the results have been 
satisfactory. 

The mills on the Carson River are running 
to their full capacity, and there is plenty of 
water. 



Mining Schools in Germany. 



In all parts of Germany there are schools 
for the purpose of imparting the theoretical as 
well as practical knowledge necessary to be. 
come a skillful and efficient mine manager. 
These are open to all classes, even the poorest, 
and the terms of admission are such that the 
latter can avail themselves readily of their 
advantages. 

Two of the most noted are at baarbruck and 
Siegen. In the first locality, the mines are 
worked by the German Government, and the 
school is supported by the State. The school 
at Siegen draws yearly about $600 from the 
Government, and §1,750 per annum are sub- 
cribed by the colliery owners, and these 
sums, augmented by a bequest of §450 per 
annum, represent the income of the Institution. 
The scholars pay nothing, but, on the con- 
trary, receive a trifle for lodging whilst attend- 
ing the course. The teachers, five or six in 
number, receive S950 per annum among them; 
but they have other sources of income. About 
$950 is expended on the pupils. $200 for ap- 
paratus, and the whole expenditure reaches 
about $2,500. The programme of the Royal 
school, at Saarbruck, sets forth that the objects 
are " to prepare young miners, who had had 
sufficient practical training, for the offices of 
mining surveyors and managers, and accounts 
ants, through instructions in such branches of 
study as bear on the above occupations." The 
instruction in the preparatory schools is 
rather to revive in the minds of the pupils 
their primary training, and in the preparatory 
schools the instruction does not interfere with 
the youths' labor. The only additional sub- 
jects they study are the rudiments of 
geometry and the construction of machines. 
At Saarbruck, there are seventy-five scholars; 
at Siegen, about fifty. The subjects of . in- 
struction are, for the lower classes, writing, 
drawing, arithmetic— especially the arithmetio 
connected with mining (mathematics) — me- 
chanics and mechanism, surveying, chemistry, 
and geology. The subjects are the same for 
the upper classes, but, as might be expected, 
the scholars spent less time in writing and 
chawing, and more in studying mining and 
machinery. Inregard to mathematics, apraeti- 
cal turn is given to the instruction, the lower 
class studying mensuration, leveling, &c, and 
the upper class trigonometry applied to the 
measuring of angles (for ascertaining the 
heights of objects), the making of estimates, 
whilst the elements of algebra and the use of 
logarithms are taught to the upper and lower 
classes. To illustrate the laws in geology, 
there are excellent maps and models, showing 
the position of the strata and the situation of 
the beds of ore. The greatest number of hours 
are given to surveying and drawing plans, the 
study of the machinery, and the science of 
working mines. 

What is called mining science included in- 
struction in the various gases found; how 
they were found; how to get rid of them; and 
how to recover those affected by them; the 
best kind of ventilation; the different kinds of 
roads, shafts, pumping apparatus; and the best 
way of preventing accidents. Mere theoretical 
knowledge of these matters would be of little 
moment, but the students in these schools are 
all practical miners taken out of the pits. Be- 
fore they could enter they must have worked 
two years in the pits, and the average was 
rive years' service in the mines. To such as 
these, instruction as to the causes and princi- 
ples of everything they saw around them must, 
of course, be productive of good, and would 
enable them to be better guides and foremen 
to the other miners. 

Is there not in this a hint to our people? 
As mush as we may try to disguise the fact, 
"knowledge is power," and the workman who 
can do a thing, and tell why he did it, is the 
superior of the one who has only the practical 
acquaintance with the art. Our workingmen 
realize this in practice, at least, and there are 
hundreds and thousands of the children of the 
most ignorant laborers who are to-day the su- 
perior of their parents in knowledge, simply 
because the good, sterling, common sense of 
the laborer tells him that in the long run bone 
and brawn alone will not conquer, but brain 
with these will. It iB these that will bring 
higher wages and a better culture, and do vast- 
ly more to improve the condition of the la- 
borer than anything else possibly can. — Am. 
Manufacturer. 

Quicksilver. — An Eastern paper remarks: 
"The Treasurer of the Quicksilver Mining 
Company states that an arangement has been 
made between it and the New Idria Company to 
produce during the year ending April 1, 1874, 
only 34,000 flasks, the Quicksilver being re- 
stricted to 24,000, and the New Idria to 10,000 
flasks. By the arrangement each company re- 
ceives the market price of quicksilver instead 
of a price determined by contract as heretofore. 
Already the receipts of the Quicksilver Com- 
pany have been about $1,000 per day larger 
than those under the last contract the company 
had. The Quicksilver Company have already 
paid off $440,000 of their first mortgage bonds 
due June 1, being all so far presented. The 
entire amount maturing June 1, was $500,000." 
This limitation of production is an old form, 
applicable years ago when the supply far ex- 
ceeded the wants of the market, but is now, 
when the production is, with difficulty, half 
that quantity, quite inapplicable. The whole 
production, much or little, is sold by theagent, 
Thomas Bell, Esq, 



Bad Speculations. 

From time to time we notice the organization 
of companies, with large capital, at Pittsburg, 
St. Louis, Chicago and other places for the 
purpose of erecting reduction works of great 
capacity to treat ores from Utah, Idahd Mon- 
tana, Colorado and other mining regions. Al- 
ready works are in operation in several of the 
large cities, and there are reasons for believing 
that they are not financially a success. 

We cannot understand why men having cap- 
ital to invest iu reduction works should wish 
to invest their money in cities hundreds of 
miles away from the mining regions, where 
the freight charges on crude ores are so enor- 
mously high. It seems to us the sheerest folly 
to expend hundreds of thousands of dollars in 
the erection of works at such points, when 
there is no reason why they may not be erected 
in the vicinity of the mines, at least so far as 
Utah is concerned. 

It is no difficult matter to foretell that in the 
early future the vicinity of Salt Lake will be 
the great center for reduction works of all 
kinds. The reasons for this are, that it will 
be the great railroad center of the interior 
country, that fuel is both cheap and abundant, 
as also are fluxes, that labor is not higher than 
elsewhere and, moreover, we are situated 
right in the heart of the mineral country, with 
narrow gauge communication to all the princi- 
pal mining camps. This being the case. Salt 
Lake City offers far superior advantages to any 
of the Eastern cities for the expenditure of 
capital for reduction works, and Eastern men 
would do well to reconsider many of their pro- 
posed plans and invest their money where it 
will yield the best interest. Looking at the 
subject from our standpoint, we believe that, 
of all the works now erected in the East for 
the treatment of ores from the interior country, 
but one or two will remain engaged in the bus- 
iness at the expiration of two or three years. 
Gentlemen, come to Utah and examine the 
field, and you will all reach the same con- 
clusion. — Salt Lake Tribune. 

5 

The Coal Fields or Chtna. — There has long 
been much talk of the extensive coal fields 
within the Chinese Empire, but nothing defi- 
nite had been published concerning them. M 
Louis Strauss, Consul for Belgium at one of 
the Chinese ports, now furnishes the Indepen 
dence Beige with the following figures as to the 
extent of the coal formation in the northern 
provinces of- the Empire: 

Sq. miles. 

In Chiensi 9,000 

In Cnanei 28,000 

In Tchyli t 30,000 

In Chin-King 20,000 

87.000 

In addition to these there are the coal de- 
posits of Formosa, an island off the Chinese 
coast, of 10,000 square miles, making the to- 
tal coal area 97,000 square miles. The United 
States is the only other nation which has any- 
thing like the same extent of coal lands. The 
area in this country is estimated at 120,000 
square miles. The 12,000 square miles of 
coal deposits in the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and 18,000 in its colonial dependen- 
cies, make an insignificant showing in com- 
parison with the vast deposits of China. Yet 
with all this known mineral wealth, the 
Chinese, who have seen the value of coal in the 
United States and the Australian colonies, 
have hitherto shown no signs of working their 
mines at home. It has however recently been 
said, but it is only a rumor, that the Court at 
Pekin is favorably disposed towards the intro- 
duction of the rail roads into the Empire. 
Perhaps the Mongolian mind may yet awake 
from its long sleep of thousands of years, to 
realize the value of these deposits. It may 
find more profit in keeping its coolie labor at 
home, providing e*neap coal for the accessible 
markets, than in seeking to take the place of 
Africa in supplying slaves to the aristocratic 
nations. 

Mines on Mexican Geants. — A correspond- 
ent who has heard of the discovery of some met- 
alliferous veins on the line of the railroad be- 
tween Saucelito and San Kafael, inquires of the 
Alia how he can acquire a valid miner's claim 
there. The answer is, that his best plan is to 
buy the Mexican grant, for all the land there 
iB held under that title. Mexico in her grants 
reserved the title to all the precious metals, 
and miners could occupy any portion of a 
rancho necessary for mining operations, but 
the United States Supreme Court has decided 
that a Federal patent conveys an absolute 
title to the land and all that may be found in 
it; and, therefore, takes the mines as well as 
the soil. Under this decision, the grant-own- 
ers like to carry the survey up into the barren 
mountains in places where gold abounds. 

The Newspapee Peess. — A collector of sta- 
tistics informs us that California ranks fourth 
in the number of her daily papers. New York 
heads the list with 96 dailies; Pennsylvania 
has 70; Illinois, 37; California, 31. Ohio has 
27, and Massachusetts 25. There are 647 
daily, 96 tri-weekly, 101 semi-weekly, and 9,175 
weekly papers published in the States and 
Territories. 

Wondeeful Mine. — Here's an item for san- 
guine miners who find every thing wanted in 
one piece of ore (when they want to sell.) 
The Hickory Press says a wonderful mine has 
been discovered by Colonel J. W. McElrath in 
the South Mountains, Virginia, which contains 
mica, silver and assafcedita with Borne indica- 
tions of petroleum oil gas. 



~ An Important Discovery. 

The White Pine News says: It has long been 
our wish to speak of the discovery of stone 
coal at Pancake, but we have refrained from 
doing fo, fearing that a premature expose might 
injure the prospects of the owners of the prop- 
erty. Now, however, that the fact of the ex- 
istence of good coal in quanties has been de- 
monstrated, as we are informed, beyond a 
doubt, it has become a matter of public interest 
to all people. The mine where this valuable 
discovery was made is situated on the Pancake 
range of mountains, fifteen miles from Hamil- 
ton, in the immediate vicinity of J. D. Sulli- 
van's old station. Some four years ago the 
latter gentleman, then living on his ranch at 
the place mentioned, thought he could trace 
indications of the existence of coal, and at 
once commenced sinking a shaft, which he 
finally abandoned, until Col. A. Lewis, an en- 
ergetic mining gentleman, well known in 
White Pine and vicinity, in company with 
Fred. Barrows, were attracted to the spot, and, 
becoming convinced of the presence of coal at 
that place, entered into arrangements with Mr. 
Sullivan to commence work on the same. Col. 
Lewis at once proceeded East, and after con- 
siderable difficulty succeeded in interesting 
some parties there in his enterprise, and work 
has been prosecuted steadily since. To the 
gentlemen now engaged in the development of 
this valuable property is due great credit for 
their persistent efforts against much opposi- 
tion from practical miners and theoretical sci- 
entists, who never acknowledge the presence 
of anything until some other parties make dis- 
coveries; then they know all about it and de- 
clare that the formation of the country proves 
unmistakably the existence of the article 
sought for. Science is well enough, but had 
Col. Lewis and his companions listened to ad- 
vice from its devotees, they would never have 
made the discovery of marketable coal in Pan- 
cake range. No doubt can possibly exist of 
the value and extent of the mine, as, we are 
informed, that at a depth of 200 feet a vein of 
four feet eight inches has been exposed, which 
can be readily extracted. The locality wherein 
this discovery is made renders the value of the 
property greater from its contiguity to the 
smelting furnaces of Eureka, and the valley 
through which the line of railroad is proposed 
to be built. When all arrangements are com- 
plete, a large force of men will be set at work 
on this mine, and we can confidently expect 
to see coal in use, both for domestic and smelt- 
ing purposes. The owners of the mine are 
naturally much elated at the prospect before 
them, and with much truth, believe that their 
possessions exceed by far the richest silver 
mine in Eastern Nevada. 



Slate and Coal Discovebt. — It is rumored 
that immense bodies of slate and coal have 
been recently discovered at the point of the 
mountain west of Salt Lake City. The ledge 
of slate is pronounced by those who say they 
have seen it to be of fine quality, and splits off 
in large and very thin bodies even at the crop- 
pings. 

Should the discovery turn out to be as re- 
ported, it will be one of the most valuable and 
useful ones yet made. 

Mexican Mines. — A correspondent writes 
from Mexico as follows : The mines are now 
worked with much vigor in every part of the 
country; the governor of Aguas Calientes, 
Chavez, formed a company to reopen the old 
mines of Alta Pamira and No Pensada, which 
had been abandoned more than twenty years. 
The mints are also kept busy, and in April, 
that of Guanajuato coined $350,000 in gold and 
Bilver; that of San Luis, $87,000, and others 
in proportion. — Call. 

San Kapael Mines. — The San Diego World 
has the following regarding the San Rafael 
mines: The San Nicholas mine cleaned up a 
few days ago, after a crushing of one hundred 
and eighty tons of rock, netting some twelve 
hundred dollars. This mine is owned by the 
Messrs. Mendelson, Leon, Merrible and others. 
The ten-stamp mill attached to the San Nicho- 
las, with water would have been kept busy 
straight along crushing its own rock, and that 
of the Pueblo, Zapata, and other adjoining 
mines. Work is at present suspended on the 
Trindad mine. 

Big Team. — The Eureka Senlineloi June 17th 
says: "There were 80,113 pounds of bullion 
shipped on Prichard's mammoth team of twenty- 
four mules and six wagons yesterday. The item 
should be copied in the Eastern papers, and 
half of their readers would say the reporter 
lied; that there never were so many animals, 
wagons and bars of bullion in one string. 

Mlneeal Hill Mines. — A dispatch says : 
The mines in this district are looking much 
better than for the past few months. Several 
claims are now being worked that have been 
lying idle for more than a year. In the ad- 
joining district lately organized, known as 
Hardscrabble, the mines are steadily increas- 
ing in richness. Business has an upward 
tendency. 

The mining tunnel to be run from Black 
Hawk to Middle Park, Colorado, will cut 
through a spur of the Bocky Mountains and 
be 12 miles in length, when completed. It will 
probably also be used for railway purposes. 
The money is furnished by English capitalists. 



July 5. 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Domestic EcofJopy* 

Cooking as a Science and an Art 

At the International Exhibition in London, 
Mr. Backmister lectures on cooking. He has 
abundanet and efficient assistance, and all the 
materials and accessories he needs (or the com- 
plete illustration of his subjects. Having 
mounted his rostrum, where a variety of ol>- 
jects have been arranged to his hand for ill us- 
trative purposes, he is waited upon by four 
dapper female cooks, appropriately attired, wh 
watch his eye and hand, and hang upon his 
lips, suiting their actions to his words. He 
vindicates his mission manfully as a teacher 
of practical cookery, and contends that there is 
greater dignity in a housewife, or a woman of 
any class, being able to cook economically a 
wholesome, palatable dinner, than in being 
able to fashion and minipulate flounces. His 
object, he stated, was not to show how to pre- 
pare costly, high-class dishes, but to point out 
defects in our domestic cookery, and to suggest 
remedies. 

Aided by his assistants he proceeds to pre- 
pare various dishes, which he subsequently 
passed around among the audience, who test 
their quality. Meat is put on to steam and 
boil, vegetables are scraped and sliced, a few 
words being interspersed concerning their re- 
spective characters and qualities, and the 
manner in which they should be prepared and 
manipulated. At a late lecture he prepared a 
French pot au /eu, an excellent and economi- 
cal dish. Some few pounds of meat and bones 
were placed in a stew pan and covered about 
two inches over the top with pure, soft water. 
An onion is next peeled, and put down to 
roast. Another onion is peeled and garnished 
with a dozen cloves, stuck round in center. 
The other vegetables are then scraped and 
sliced. These consisted of two carrots, a par- 
snip, two turnips ^ these can scarcely be peel- 
ed too thickly, while potatoes cannot be peel- 
ed too thinly, as far as the mere cuticle goes), 
half a head of celery, a leek, and for a flavoring 
bouquet, a sprig of marjoram, another of 
thyme, a small bunch of parsley, two bay-leaves, 
and a clove of garlic. The saucepan, which 
has been simmering on the cooking-stove, is 
then carefully skimmed, and the carrots ad- 
ded ten minutes before the other vegetables, 
the other ingredients being a dessert-spoonful 
of salt, a teaspoonful each of whole pepper 
and of allspice; the whole is then put to sim- 
mer for three or four hours,but should not be 
allowed to boil. The time required for this 
dish, requires that it should be cooked at 
leisure after the lecture, and warmed up for 
the next day's audience. 

In referring to the aims and objects of the 
school, Air. Buckmaster quotes the proverb, 
"God sends meat," but another party " sends 
cooks." His numerous and respectable audience 
relish| his soup, beef, and omelettes, and his 
lecture, too highly to suspect for a moment 
that he or his assistants were in the service 
of the said other party; and although all pres- 
ent might be in accord in applying to them 
the adjective clever, not one, we feel assured, 
dream of attaching the substantive. 



and which should be kept under the sink, in 
some odd nook — the other should be smaller, 
and only be used to set the tea kettle, etc., up- 
on when filling, and therefore must be kept 
handy and clean, so if you should be sick 
with a headache, pain in your aide, or any 
little triding thing, and shonld ask your kind 
husband to fill the tea kettle, he would take 
the cricket down to set it on, instead of setting 
it in the sink — thus causing you more labor 
than it saves which he would be sure to do 
were the cricket under the sink, or so black 
and nasty, he could not touch it without soiling 
his hauls. 

And last but not least, have a light rack 
made of strips of wood an inch wide, an 
eighth of an inch thick and a foot long, nailed 
over one another, making a rack a foot square, 
with both aides alike, to put in your sink to 
turn dishes upon while washing, thus keeping 
them from touching the sink, which is liable 
to be greasy and dirty, and draining them so 
they will wipe easily. 

You may think, fair reader, that it takes 
considerable to furnish a sink to suit my taste; 
but every one of these things are around my 
sink, and not one would I dispense with, nei- 
ther will you, after having seen how conven- 
ient they are. — Ohio Farmer, 



Qood H E 4 L TH> 



UsEflJL If^ORfl^JION. 



Kitchen Furniture. 

Never have dark furniture for a kitchen. It 
shows the dust much more than light, and 
requires double the care. Never have extra 
shelves, mantels, etc., painted dark if you can 
help it. If it is your misfortune to have dark 
paint and furniture, wipe it once in a few days 
with a damp cloth, and have it Tarnished often. 
Have your sink in a convenient place, but 
never under a window if you can avoid it, as 
much work is caused by greasy dishwater 
spattering upon the windows as it necessarily 
must. Back of your sink nail up a piece of 
varnished paper, and then you can with a wet 
cloth remove all spots that would soon spoil 
room paper. If you are so fortunate as to 
have a sink room, have it papered and then 
varnished well all over, as fly tracks and every 
spot can be wiped off. The sink should be 
lined with zinc, nailed only around the edges, 
as nails upon the bottom rust and wear 
through, allowing water to run under the sink, 
thereby causing the boards to rot. 

Good zinc can be kept nice and bright by 
scouring once in a week or two with sand, and 
rubbing all over once or twice a day with soft 
soap, scalding and wiping dry. 

At one side have a place to put your water 
pail on, which always day and night keep 
covered; an uncovered water pail is a slack 
thing. Nailed upon the back side of the sink, 
have a little box perforated through the bot- 
tom, to keep hard soap in, and if you have no 
better place, castile soap and a piece of pumice 
stone to remove stains from your hands. 
Your soft soap keep under the sink, which I 
take for granted is boarded up, with a door 
where you put your pots and kettles, board to 
scour knives upon, sand, etc., etc., and which 
place should be kept as neat as your sitting 
room. Just over the sink have a narrow 
shelf with holes through, to set your common 
tumblers upon when washed and rinsed, that 
they may drain and dry, thus saving the time 
and labor of wiping them with a dry cloth. 

At the other end of the sink, have a narrow 
strip nailed up to set your kettle cricket on ; 
of these you should have two, one to set your 
kettles on when washing and cleaning them, 



The Eye of an Eagle. 

The eyes of all birds have a peculiarity of 
structure which, enables them to see near or 
distant objects equally well, and this .wonder- 
ful power is carried to the greatest perfection 
in the bird of prey. When we recollect that an 
eagle will ascend more than a mile in perpen- 
dicular bight, and from that enormous eleva- 
tion will perceive its unsuspecting prey, and 
pounce on it with unerring certainty ; and when 
we see the same birds scrutinizing, with almost 
microscopic .nicety, an object close at hand, we 
shall at once perceive that he possesses a power 
of accommodating his sight to distances in a 
manner to which our eye is unfitted, and of 
which it is totally incapable. If we take a 
printed page, we shall find that there is some 
particular distance, probably ten inches, at 
which we can read the words and see each let- 
ler with perfect distinctness; but if we move 
this page to a distance of forty inches, or bring 
it within a distance of five inches, we shall find 
it impossible to read it all; a scientific man 
would therefore, call ten inches the focus or 
focal distance of our eyes. We cannot alter 
this focus except by the aid of spectacles. 

But an eagle has the power of altering the 
focus of his eye just as he pleases; he has only 
to look at an object at the distance of two feet, 
or two miles, in order to see it with perfect 
distinctness. Of course, the eagle knows noth- 
ing of the wonderful contrivance which God 
has supplied for his accommodation; he em- 
ploys it instinctively and because he cannot 
help it. The^ball of his eye is surrounded by 
fifteen little plates, called sclerotic bones; they 
form a complete ring, and their edges slightly 
overlap each other. When he looks at a dis- 
tant object, this little circle of bones expands, 
and the ball of the eye being relieved from the 
pressure becomes flatter; and when he looks 
at a very near objejt, the little bones press to- 
gether, and the ball of the eye is thus squeezed 
into a rounder or more convex form ; the effect 
is very familiar to everybody ; a person with 
very round eyes is near-sighted, and only sees 
clearly an object that is close to him; and a 
person with flat eyes, as in old age, can see 
nothing clearly except at a distance; the eagle, 
by the mere will, can make his eyes round or 
flat, and see with equal clearness at any dis- 
tance. 

Intebesting and Useful Facts. — A bell rung 
under water returns a tone as distinct as if 
rung in the air. 

Stop one ear with the finger and press the 
other to the end of a long stick, and if a watch 
be held at the other end of the wood, ticking 
will be heard, be the wood a stick ever so long. 

Tie a poker in the middle of a strip of flan- 
nel two or three feet long, and press your 
thumbs or fingers into your ears, while you 
swing your poker against an iron fender, and 
you will hear a sound like that of a heavy 
church bell. 

These experiments prove that water, wood 
and flannels are good conductors of sound, for 
the sound of the cell, the watch and the fender 
passes through the water and along the deal 
and flannel to the ear, and excite in us the 
sense of sound. Sound of all kinds, it is as- 
certained, travels at the rate of fifteen miles in 
a minute. The softest whisper travels as fast 
as the most tremendous thunder. The know- 
ledge of this fact has been applied to the meas- 
urement of distance. 

Suppose a ship in distress fires a gun, the 
light of which is seen on shore, or by another 
vessel, twenty seconds before a report is heard, 
it is known to be a distance of 20 times 1,143 
feet, or a little more than four and a half miles. 



Premonitions of Consumption. 

Somebody asks if it is possible to tell that a 
person is predisposed to consumption; if it is 
true that one shows by an outward appearance 
whether he will, under bad hygiene, be more 
likely than his neighbor to got the disorder. 
Most certainly it is, to a great degree. 

A child who has a thin, delicate, light skin, 
light hair, light, prominent and speaking eyes, 
who grows rapidly and is plump and fat, who 
is precocious and over smart, is the one who 
it may be suspected is consumptive. That 
child who, in his or her mental and moral na- 
ture promises most, as its parents view it, is 
most likely to have consumption; the brain ele- 
ments which have to do with good morals, good 
feelings and mental Acumen, are those which 
in consumptive children ore most apt to be 
overgrown. 

Very early such children usually manifest a 
dislike for fatty foods; this symptom is very 
general, occurring through life in more than 
half the persons who have the disease, and be- 
ing observed in nearly all in whom the disease 
is either incipient or confirmed. An habitual 
disrelish for fat by a young person is sufficient 
to arouse a suspicion of tuberculous tendency. 
The dislike for this particular articre of diet is 
occasioned by an inability to digest it, not from 
any so-called freak of taste; rather the taste is 
determined by the powers of the system. 

The inability to digest fat is a kind of dys- 
pepsia, and some form of dyspepsia exists in 
nearly all cases of consumption. Usually, 
there is with this failure of digestion an an- 
noying eructation of acid from the stomach, 
that has with some given it the name of acid dys- 
pepsia. In not more than ten per cent, of 
cases does tuberculosis occur without being 
preceded by some sort of indigestion, albeit 
only comparatively a few cases of dyspepsia oc- 
cur in consumptives. — Maine Fanner. 



Women's Legs. — Here is something from the 
Book of Beauty that is strictly local here or 
anywhere else. Women should read it: 

"A handsome leg is a rarity, we had almost 
said an impossibility, among American women. 
The reason of this is the place where they wear 
their garters. No French woman, no English 
woman of cultivation, now-a-days wears her 
garters below the knees. It is ruinous to the 
shape of the calf. Alore than this, it has'seri- 
ous consequences of another kind. The prin- 
cipal vein of the leg, vena saphrenabrevis, runs 
just beneath the skin until it nearly reaches 
the knee, when it sinks between the muscles. 
Now, if this is constricted at its largest point 
by a tight garter, the blood is checked in its 
return to the heart, the feet are easily chilled, 
and more liable to disease; the other veins of 
the leg are swollen into hard blue knots, be- 
come varicose, as it is called, and often break, 
forming obstinate ulcers. This is a picture 
which . a physician sees nearly every day. 
With the garter fastened above the knee a*ll 
this pain and deformity is avoided, but it is 
still better to wear no garter at all, and to sus- 
pend the stocking by tapes around the waist. 
In this case, however, a well-fitting stocking 
is needed." 



Phosphoeus. — Red amorphous phosphorus, 
under the influence of solar heat, as does char- 
coal, has the property of absorbing many sub- 
stances without acting chemically upon them, 
as rosaniline, iodine, sulphur. Pulverized 
phosphorus agitated in a solution of iodine in 
bisulphate of carbon or rosaniline in alcohol, 
absorbs the iodine or the rosaniline, leaving 
the solution colorless. These facts are pub- 
lished as the result of the labors of II. Testini. 



Ammonia tn Whooping Cough. — A writer in 
the British Medical Journal, states that in cases 
of whooping cough in the last stage — that is, 
after the third week — he has had one ounce of 
the strongest liquid ammonia put into a gal* 
Ion of boiling water in an open pan, and the 
steam kept up by means of half a brick made 
red-hot throughout, and put into the boiling 
water containing the ammonia, the pan being 
placed in the middle of a room into which the 
patients were brought as the ammoniated 
steam was passing off. This method, he says, 
was used in the evening, just before bed-time ; 
and it proved so efficacious in abating the 
spasmodic attack, and after three or four days 
terminating the malady, as to establish, be- 
yond any doubt, the great value of this mode 
of inhaling ammonia as a therapeutic agent in 
tranquilizing the nervous system in the whoop- 
ing cough. 

Weabisg Flannel. — The majority of people 
are not aware of the beneficial effects of wear- 
ing flannel next to the body, both in cold and 
warm weather. Flannel is certainly not so 
uncomfortable in warm weather as prejudiced 
people believe. Frequent colds and constant 
hacking coughs have left me since adopting 
flannel garments. There is no need of great 
bulk about the waist, which condemns the 
wearer of flannels with those who prefer wasp- 
waists, always fastening at the back. There are 
scarcely any of the bad effects of sudden 
changes of weather felt by those who wear 
flannel garments, and all mothers especially 
should endeavor to secure such for their little 
people, in preference to all those showy out- 
side trimmings which fashion commends. 

Natcee of the Pain feom Bubns. — It is the 
common opinion that persons severely burned 
suffer the like pain with those who are slightly 
injured by fire; but such is not the case. In- 
stead of experiencing a burning sensation, 
they suffer from a feeling of coldness; the blood 
being driven from the surface of the body to 
the heart, lungs, etc.; and persons that die 
from injury by fire, suffer in somewhat the 
same manner with those that are frozen to 
death. 



Eating When Exhausted. 

When the strength or nerve power is already 
worn out, or used np, the digestion of food only 
makes a fresh demand upon it, and if it be un- 
able to meet the demand, the food is only a 
burden upon it, producing mischief. Our 
bodies have been compared to steam engines, 
the food being the fuel and the steam produced 
the nerve power. The analogy holds good to 
a certain extent. If, when the steam is low, 
because the fire is low, yon pile in too fast a 
quantity of coal, you put out your fire, and if 
you have depended upon steam power to fan 
your fires, that is also extinguished. Beyond 
this the comparison fails. You ninj clean out 
your furnaces and begin again, but in the body 
the consequences of this overloading are danger- 
ous and sometimes fatal. No cause of cholera 
is more common than eating freely when ex- 
hausted. The rule should be to rest for a time, 
and take some simple refreshment, a cup, or 
part of a cup, of tea, a little broth, or even a 
piece of bread — anything simple and in small 
amount, just to stimulate the stomach slightly, 
and begin to restore its power. After rest, a 
moderate quantity will be refreshing. Never 
eat a full meal when you are exhausted. Take 
first a small quantity of anything simple which 
may be handy, and rest. Then, after a time, 
proper food will be a blessing, not a burden. 
The fires will burn, the steam will be up, and 
you can go on your way safely. It is not 
amiss, in this connection, to say that children 
would avoid many a feverish night and many 
an attack of disease, if mothers would follow 
this rule. — Ex. 



A Healthy City. 

It appears from the following table, com- 
piled from the Census returns of 1870, that 
with the exception of Valparaiso, San Fran- 
cisco is the healthiest city on the continent. 
The figures show the number of deaths in each 
1,000 inhabitants for the year: 

Valparaiso (Chili) 16 jBoston 30 

San Francisco 17 [New Orleans 30 

St. Louis 20 | Newark 31 

Cincinnati 20 Halifax 31 



Baltimore. 

Philadelphia 20 

Chicago 27 

Brooklyn 28 



NewTork.. 

Savannah 36 

Montreal 37 

Memphis 46 



There is no doubt that the summer winds, 
that cause so much discomfort and annoyance, 
and provoke so many animadversions by res- 
idents of San Francisco, perform a very im- 
portant mission in bearing away the malarious 
elements, which would otherwise poison the 
air and propagate disease in this city. The 
above showing is most gratifying to Colifor- 



CoOLXNG OFT SUDDENLY WHEN HEATED sends 

many of our farmers' youth to on early tomb. 
It is often a matter of surprise that so many 
farmers' boys and girls die of consumption. It 
is thought that abundant exercise id the open 
air is directly opposed to that disease. So it 
is; but judgment and knowledge of the laws 
of health are esential to the preservation of 
health under any circumstances. When over- 
heated, cool off slowly — never in a strong 
draught of air. Gentle fanning, especially if 
the face is wet with cold water, will soon pro- 
duce a delightful coolness, which leaves no dis- 
agreeable results. 



Common Sense. 



There is a chilly, disagreeable article, 
called common sense, which is, of all things 
most repulsive and antipathetical to all 
petted creatures whose life has consisted 
in flattery. It is the kind of talk which 
sisters are very apt to hear from brothers, 
and daughters from fathers and mothers, 
when fathers and mothers do their duty by 
them! which sets the world before them 
as it is, and not as it is painted by flatter- 
ers. Those women who prater the society 
of gentlemen, and who have the faculty of 
bewitching their senses, never are in the 
way of hearing from this cold matter-of- 
fact region; for them it really does not ex- 
ist. Every phrase that meets their ear is 
polished and softened, guarded and deli- 
cately turned, till there is not a particle 
of homely truth left in it. They pass 
their time in a world of illusions; they 
demand these illusions of all who approach 
them, as the condition of peace and favor. 
All persons, as a sort of instinct, recog- 
nize the woman who lives by flattery, and 
give her the portion of meat to which she 
is entitled indue season; and thus some 
poor women are hopelessly buried, as sui- 
cides used to be in Scotland, under a 
mountain of rubbish, to which each passer- 
by adds one stone. It is only by some 
extraordinary power of circumstances that 
a man can be found to invade the sover- 
eignty of a pretty woman with any disa- 
greeable tidings, or as Junius says, "to 
instruct the throne in the language of 
truth."— Mrs. 3.B. Slotce. 

If thine enemy wrong thee, buy each of 
his children a drum. 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC P&ESS. 



[July 5, 1873- 




— — — * y= 

W. B. EWEB .-.» .Sekiob Editob 

DEWEY «fc CO., FixbllsJiers. 

A T. DEWEY, flE0 - H - STEONG 

W. B. BWBB, «T0- *■• BOONE 

Office, No. 338 Montgomery St., S. E. Cor- 
ner of California St., diagonally across from 
Wells, Farsro & Co.'fl. 

Subbohtptionb payable In advance — For one year, $4; 
■ix monthB, #2.60; three months, $1.26. Clubs of ten 
names or more, $3 each per annum. 15, in advance, 
will pay for 1H year. Remittances by registered letters 
or P. O. orders at our risk. 
Advebtising Rates. — lweek. 1 month. 3 months, lyear. 

Per line 26 .80 $2.00 $5.00 

One-half Inch $1.00 $3.00 7.50 24.00 

One inch 2.00 5.00 14.00 40.00 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or 
reading notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing 
in extraordinary type or in particular parts of the paper, 
Insertedd at special rates. 

San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 5, 1873- 

Legul Tender Rates.— S. F., Thurs., July 3. - 
buying 80 J$; Belling 87. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



GENERAL EDITORIALS.— Arctic Travel and 
Adventure, Page 1. Calif ornia Gravel Mines; Our 
Natal Day; The Hamilton Fire, 8. Accidenta in 
Mines; Concentration of Ores; The Virginia Calam- 
ity, 9. 

ILLUSTRATIONS. — The Whaling Fleet in the 
Ice Pagre 1. Wren's Ore Concentrator, 9. 

CORRESPONDENCE. — The Vienna Exposi- 
tiOD, 2. Arizona Mines; The San Diego Mines; 
West Point Mines; Numbering or Classifying the Corn- 
stock Mines, 2. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— Rotation of Liquids; 
Practical Use of the Carbonic Acid .Resulting from 
Fermentation; Percolation of Gases; Departure of 
Plants from their Original Types; Saponin cation; 
Scientific Prize-Award, 3. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS— A Valuable In- 
vention — Enameled Brick; Progress in the Manufac- 
ture of Mirrors; Various Qualities of Iron; Another 
Answer; Raising Steam by Solar Heat; Device for In- 
creasing the Flow of Wells, 3. 

MINING SUMMARY from various counties in 
California, Oregon and Utah, 5-12. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Table of Dally 
Sales and Prices and Comparative Prices for the 
Week; Notices of AsseBsments; Meetings and Divi- 
dends; Review of Stock Market for the Week, 4. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.— Cooking as a Science 
and an Art; Kitchen Furniture, 7. 

USEFUL INFORMATION. — The Eye of an 
Eagle; Interesting and Useful Facts; PhoBphorus, 7. 

GOOD HEALTH. —Premonitions of Consumption; 
Women's Legs; Ammonia in Whooping Cough; Wear- 
ing Flannel; Nature of the Pain from Burns; Eating 
When Exhausted; A Healthy City; Cooling oft Sud- 
denly when Heated; Common Sense, 7. 

MISCELLANEOUS. — California in the Ninth 
Census; Schpol Ship; Mining Schools in Germany; 
Quicksilver; Bad Speculations; The Coal Fields of 
China; Mines on Mexican Grants; The Newspaper 
Press; Wonderful Mine; An Important Discovery; 
Slate and Coal Discovery; Mexican Mines; San Rafael 
Mines; Big Team; Mineral Hill Mines, 6. Common 
Sense, 7. Consumption of Sugar; Farmers' Anti- 
Monopoly Movement; Hoisting Machinery in Salt 
Lake; Gold Diggings; The Wheat Crop; Working 
Low Grade Ores; Assyrian Research; Madder; Some- 
thing about the Carson River; The Garibaldi Ledge; 
A New Chlorinizing and Desulphurizing Furnace; A 
Cheap Paint, 10. 



New Banking Establishment. — A new bank 
commenced business in this city this week 
called the Anglo-California Bank, (limited,) 
successors to I. Seligman & Co. The San 
Francisco office is at 412 California street, and 
the London office at No. 3 Angel Court. The 
authorized capital stock of the institution is 
©6,000,000, of which $3,000,000 has been sub- 
scribed and $1,500,000 paid in; the remainder 
is subject to call. The Directors in London 
are Hon. Hugh McCulloch, 1m. F. Scholfield, 
Reuben D. Sassoon, Isaac Seligman and Julius 
Liugton. The San Francico managers are 
Richard G. Sneath and Ignatz Steinhart. Mr. 
Seligman is well known as a successful banker 
and Mr. Sneath as a successful business man 
alive to the leading interests of San Franoisco. 
The bank is prepared to open accounts, receive 
deposits, make collections, to buy and sell ex- 
change and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world, and to loan money on 
proper security. The stock of this bank being 
held by leading bankers and capitalists of Eu- 
rope and America, the bank will have facilities 
in the registration abroad of State, municipal 
and other securities upon favorable terms. 



Coal in San Feancisco. — It is said that the 
company formed in London to purchase the 
Newport Coal mine at Coos Bay, will put on a 
line of steam colliers between the Bay and 
San Francisco. It is believed that this coal 
can be offered by the cargo in San Francisco 
for seven or eight dollars a ton. During the 
past winter it sold from $14 to $15, retail. 

Low Grade Oees. — The Georgetown Miner 
states that work re-commenced on the Mendota 
lode (Sherman Mountain) some time ago, and 
it is now turning out some fine looking lead 
ore, which, owing to the markets now existing 
in Denver and Golden for low grades, can be 
moved with profit. 



California Gravel Mines. 

We Californians boast, and justly too, of the 
vast resources of our State; we write, talk and 
sing of its wonderful products, both agricul- 
tural and mineral; we predict its magnificent 
future in the coming years, and yet few of us 
really know what its resources are, or what its 
prospective value is. We are all acquainted 
with the fact that five or six hundred thousand 
people are annually adding millions of dollars 
to the wealth of the world, but few realize what 
might be done if ample capital and intelligent 
enterprise were applied to improve and develop 
its hidden wealth. 

Any one who will take the trouble to spen d 
a few months in exploring some of the mining 
counties of the State, will find that one of the 
most important branches of our industry has 
been very much neglected; we allude to gravel 
mining. A friend of ours, who has recently 
made an extended tour through the mining 
counties of the State, furnishes us with 
some interesting statements, concerning the 
localities in which gravel mining is being prose- 
cuted to the greatest extent. Although 
there is more being done in this line 
than is generally known, yet there is a 
vast region of country stretching in an 
almost continuous line from the lower end of 
Mariposa to the upper end of Trinity county 
and many miles in width, covered with aurifer- 
ous gravel that only awaits the application of 
capital and intelligent direction to astonish the 
world with its production of gold dust, to say 
nothing of the numerous gold quartz, copper, 
coal, etc., which abound throughout this min- 
eral belt. 

There seems more activity injgravel mining 
in some of the 

Middle Mining Counties, 
Such as El Dorado, Placer, Nevada, Yuba, 
Sierra, Butte and Plumas, than those south 
and north. In Mariposa, Tuolumne, Calavarus 
and Amador, but little hydraulic mining is 
being done. A few mines are being worked by 
the drifting process along the line of Table 
Mountain in the three last named counties. 
In those north of Plumas even less gravel min- 
ing is carried on, and yet there is no doubt of 
the existence of vast gravel beds in all of the 
counties named, both north and south. One 
reason for the slow progress made in deep 
gravel mining is the want of sufficient means 
by the mine owners to open their claims and to 
obtain the requisite water supply. On the 

Decline of the Shallow Washings 
The mining region was left in a state some- 
what of chaos, as to the laws and regulations 
governing deep gravel mining. The laws 
were framed by Districts, and were peculiar to 
each, sn as to accommodate rapine, bar or flat. 
These laws granted but a small lot of ground 
to each man, which now is found too small for 
extended operations; and in order to obtain 
sufficient ground to justify the necessary out- 
lay for opening bed rock tunnels, or cuts, for 
outlets, purchasing and laying down pipes, 
and constructing ditches for the supply of 
water, the owners are compelled either to con- 
solidate their claims and work in common, or 
some one of their number more enterprising 
than the rest, or being possessed with more 
means, purchases the interests of his neighbors, 
thus securing a fine property to himself. 
But after becoming possessed of this large body 
of ground, though it might be ever so rich in 
gold dust, has an elephant on his hands. 
He has secured but one of the four essentials 
requisite for a highly remunerative mine — 
plenty of gold gravel. But water in greater 
quantity must be had, with greater pressure, 
and still his property must remain worthless 
to h int without an outlet to drain the mine, 
and carry off the debris and save the gold. 

The Way Capital is Obtained. 

What then is he to do? either to allow this 
valuable mine to remain idle or to obtain the 
means necessary to place it in working condi- 
tion. To do this in San Francisco means the 
sacrifice of a large portion of his property, or 
a ruinous rate of interest to start with; and in 
the end the loss of his entire estate by 'the 
"freeze-out" principle, bo prevalent here; he 
is naturally frightened from seeking relief from 
this quarter, and turns elsewhere. He is told 
there is an abundance of cheap money seeking 
investment, on the other side of the Atlantic. 
A party presents himself, representing so he 
says, men in Europe of unlimited means, 
who are desirous of investing in California 
mines. This individual persuades the mine 
owner to give him a bond of his property for a 
year or so. This speculator or adventurer places 
it in the hands of a London promoter; it is 
hawked about for months, perhaps; and if it 
Bhould finally succeed in finding a resting 
place, when it reaches the British public who 
subscribe for the stock, it is watered to such a 
degree that it cannot possibly pay the promised 
dividends. The honest mine owner is wiling, 
we will say, to take $50,000 for his property, 
and it would pay handsome returns on a rea- 
sonable advance above this sum, to cover 
commissions for incorporating and raising the 
required capital to place it in working condi- 
tion; but it will not pay on $500,000, at which 
it is capitalized. The result is, the owner of 



the mine is ruined, for he holds worthless 
shares. The subscriber is hugely disgusted, 
for he finds too late that he has been swindled, 
and can never again be induced to invest in 
anything, however honest or legitimate, in the 
"blarsted" country. Somebody has made 
money on the other side, but our country and 
our people have to bear the stigma of cheats 
and swindlers when in truth they are innocent, 
for the fraud was perpetrated by London sharp- 
ers. All these things 

Contribute to Retard Development 

Of not only our gravel mines but other enter- 
prises in this country, and will continue to do 
so as long as this state of things prevails. Is 
there no remedy? are those hidden millions of 
treasure to remain uncovered forever? We 
venture to say there is no region of the same 
extent on the globe that offers a better field for 
the investment of capital than the one here re- 
ferred to; and yet it has been permitted, with a 
few isolated exceptions, to lie almost un- 
touched. Gravel mining can be made just as 
certain of results, just as safe and just as le- 
gitimate as farming, merchandising or any other 
branch of business, and far more profitable, for 
by the improvements recently introduced in 
this class of mining, thou sands of tons of gravel 
can be removed with a single nozzle in 24 hours 
directed by one man. With 

The Appliances now in Use 
Hydraulic mining is by far the least expensive 
ever before used. With plenty of water properly 
applied gravel will pay largely, even when it 
contains but a few cents per cubic yard. 

The Power of the Pipe 
May be illustrated in many instances. At St. 
Louis, Sierra county, for example, Mr. W. R. 
Morgan, who ownes a valuable gravel prop- 
erty there, was recently running 3,000 inches 
of water through two 8-inch nozzles under a 
great pressure, and the effect on the high bank 
of gravel was truly wonderful. This tremen- 
dous force not only disintegrated the mass 
on which it was operating, but carried it off 
over the riffle blocks, etc., through the tail 
boxes depositing the gold dust in its course, 
and thus the work of a thousand men is per- 
formed by half a dozen assisted by this power- 
ful and efficient agent, water. Mr. Morgan 
is thus enabled to clean up from $100,000 
to $150,000 per annum at a very small ex- 
pense, and from ground, too, which would not 
pay anything under the old treatment. 

Thousands of Claims of this Character 
Are lying idle to-day, which could be utilized 
with an outlay of a few thousand dollars. 
Some very valuable mines are being worked in 
the locality of Gibsonville on the 
Drifting Principle. 
This is resorted to when the gold in the 
gravel is concentrated in a strata on or near 
the bedrock, and is covered by a mass of poor 
gravel, and will not pay for removal, even with 
the pipe, or, as in many cases, capped with 
volcanic ash or lava too hard to be removed by 
water. Mines of this class must necessarily 
possess rich deposits to ensure remunerative 
returns, for the work of mining and delivery 
to the dumps must be performed by hand. 
The North America and Pilot, near Gibson- 
ville, are of this class ; and the former, owned 
by an English company, is said to be paying 
well. The Pilot joins the North America on 
the same lead, and is also paying largely. The 
Caledonia, at St. Louis, is auother mine 
of this class, which has paid handsomely for 
years. But, as a general thing, these drifting- 
mines are not so numerous or productive as 
the hydraulic mines. 

Water is the Great Want 
Of the gravel region. Without it the miner 
can do nothing. He may possess large and 
rich deposits of gold-gravel, but if he cannot 
get the water on it with sufficient pressure his 
claim is valueless, and he must wait for some- 
thing to turn up to give him the necessary 
means to render it productive. That time 
must soon come, for the attention of capitalists, 
both of the Eastern States and Europe, is be- 
ing turned in this direction. Why cannot 
men of capital here see it in this fight, take 
hold honestly with the mine-owner, make for- 
tunes for themselves, and thereby 

Develop the Resources of the Country. 

How mu ch better would it be for all concerned 
if the millions of dollars now kept in a feverish 
state of excitement on the Btock exchange 
could be applied in this way. Soon we should 
see a different state of things; instead of the 
rise and fall of stocks depending wholly on 
"Kings" and "Corners," false reports, etc., 
shares would sell and be purchased on their 
merits, thereby producing a healthy state of 
finances as well as morals, the country devel- 
oped, taxation lessened, and a new impe- 
tus given to immigration. We notice in certain 
localities symptoms of progress in this direction, 

A Large Canal 

Is now being constructed by local capital, to 
supply the wants of the extensive mining lo- 
calities of Iowa and Wisconsin Hills, Michi- 
gan Bluff, Forest Hill, etc., in Placer county.. 
A project is in contemplation of a similar kind 
for the country around Placerville, El Dorado 
county. The Eureka Canal Company, whose 
ditches now supply a very rich and extensive 
section along its course from the head of Web- 
ber Creek, westward to Shingle Springs, 
embracing the well known mining Dis- 
tricts of Diamond Springs, Mud Springs, 
New Town, etc., all in El Dorado 
county, we are told are in negotiation with 



English capitalists for extensive improvements 
on their water system. 

Our object in writing this is to call the 
attention of our own people to the importance 
of this subject that they may be beforehand 
with outsiders on this important home ques- 
tion. 



Onr Natal Day. 

Before this number of the Pbess will have 
reached the homes of a majority of its patrons, 
that ever memorable day, the 4th of July, will 
have come again, and again passed away; but 
not to be forgotten, for so long as the Ameri- 
can Continent shall stand up out of the sea as 
solid land, so long will the day be remembered 
and celebrated by the people of the "United- 
States, as the birthday of freedom. 

And it is becoming in us as the descendants' 
of noble and patriotic sires, in whose veins' 
coursed the warm blood of a pure and holy he- 
roism, that we should, as the inheritors of their 
great legacy, hold in remembrance and perpet- 
uity, the sacred trust committed to us, by keep- 
ing alive in the hearts of our people, the causes- 
and the conflict that resulted in the establish- 
ment of freedom's empire on American soil. 

It is our only, truly national holiday, and as 
we have but one, every true lover of his coun- 
try should in some way contribute, by devoting. 
the day and his efforts to the keeping alive of 
that spirit of patriotism that can alone pre- 
serve our institutions, the honor and glory of 
our people among the nations. 

If, then, it is the spirit of patriotism that we 
would kindle and nourish in the minds of our 
youth and keep the same alive as a perpetual 
fire, how can we do it better, than to let what 
there is of "old '76" spirit remaining amongst 
us, with all there is of "Young America," join 
in the grand, annual celebration so spiritedly 
predicted by the elder Adams; that the day 
would be celebrated by our children and onr 
childrens' children, with processions and 
marchings and dinners and speeches and ora- 
tions, the roar of cannon and the blaze of fire- 
works, bonfires and illuminations to the latest 
generations. 

Now we drop right down from our "spread 
eagle" height to say, that to enable all, con- 
nected in any way with the Press, in- 
cluding proprietors, editors, compositors and 
printers, to join in the celebration of the 4th, 
we issue the Pbess a day earlier than usual; 
so that if there should seem to be anything 
lacking in the present number, let it be charged 
to the account of "Independence day." 

Disastrous Fire at Hamilton. 

The mining towns of this coast are usually 
constructed in such a manner and with such 
perishable materials, that when a fire is once 
started, it commits fearful ravages in a short 
time. A year seldom passes but that we are 
called upon to chronicle the almost total de- 
struction of mining towns or camps of more or 
less note. This time it is Hamilton, Nevada, 
at what is well known as White Pine. The 
loss in this instance amounts to about $600,000 
— a very disastrous one to so small a place. It 
is stated that the White Pine Water Company 
were culpably negligent in the performance of 
their contract with the city, as it was an hour 
after the fire started before any water could be 
procured, the engine house itBelf being burned 
down. Water companies, howerever, which 
have a monopoly of the supply of any city or 
town, do about as they please in turning water 
off and on, bo the complaint is not an excep- 
tional one. A case of the same kind occurred a 
a few weeks since in San Jose, in this State, 
and we were gratified to see that one of the 
parties burned out, immediately sued the water 
company for not furnishing the water, and the 
case is now pending. Similar complaints have 
been made against the water company now 
supplying the city of Oakland. For some rea- 
son the supply is turned off periodically, and at 
such times when fires occur disastrous results 
are sure to follow. If people pay for water 
and pay taxes, it should be furnished at all 
times when in the power of the company. 

There is said to be considerable suffering 
among the poor families turned out of their 
homes by the Hamilton fire, but the people are 
helping one another as much as possible. A 
dispatch from Hamilton states that there is no 
doubt that the fire was the work of an incendi- 
ary. Below is a list of losses as far as known 
at present: 

P. A. Wagner $45,000 J= 

(No insurance.) i 

Perry's Saloon 9,000 \ 

H. Light 5,0001 

Smith Bros 5,000 J 

Ohas. Friedman .... 1,500 C 



P. Bowel! 1,500 

Fred. Vettulan. 

A. Jackbou 32,000 

A. Mau &Co 46,000 

(Insured $12,000.) 

L. C. Scott 3,000 

Wm. Davidson 4,000 

J. B. Withington 3,000 

B. Hyman 2,000 

F. W. Clute 30,000 

W. H. Naylor 3,601 

Louis Scadow 2,500 



F. W. Cole $ 2,500 

Marshall Atwood. . . . 5,000 

Wm. Hendrie 2,000 

Woodruff & Ennor. . . 30,000 

Jack Wadish 1,500 

City of Hamilton 20,000 

A. Haas 18,000 

Marco Medin 28,000 

Wm. Plumhol 2,600 

Or. Hudson 2,000 

H. Orowell 8,000 

M. Conn k Bro 3,000 

F. Pramenko 9,000 

J.Cohn&Bro 33,000 

(Insured $18,000.) ■ 

Dennis Dalley 2,600 

Ada Mordaunt 7,600 



Other losses, not apportioned, will probably 
bring the total up to nearly six hundred thous- 
and dollars. 



July 5, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Accidents In Mines. 

Scarcely a week passes bat what we are called 
upon to record numerous accidents resulting in 
loss of life or injury, incurred in pursuing min- 
ing operations. Mauy of these are the result 
of accidents which could scarcely have been 
foreseen, but by far the greater majority are 
caused from carelessness or bad management. 
Miners are, from the Tery nature of their occu- 
pation, more exposed to danger of life and 
limb, than perhaps any other class of people, 
sailors not excepted. Premature explosions, 
defective blasts, breakage of machinery, caves, 
fire, etc., combine to make their lives danger- 
ous. Moreover when men get used to baud- 
ling powder, to running up and down shafts in 
cages or tubs several times a day, working in 
dangerous ground, etc., they naturally become 
careless and negligent to a greater or less de- 
gree, and the fact that they have done these 
things so often without accident, begets a con- 
fidence that there is no dangPT in them. Occa- 
sionally, when a man is hurt or killed, the 
others about the mine will be unusually care- 
ful and attentive for a while, until the impres- 
sion wears off, when the old state of things is 
again in order. Of course, if men will not take 
ordinary precautions to preserve their lives, 
others have to legislate for them, just as our 
lawmakers pass wise laws to protect "poor 
Jack " from those rapacious land sharks — sailor 
" boarding masters." The only trouble with 
such laws as these is, that they seldom have 
the effect required ; for if a sailor wants to throw 
his money away he is bound to do it, the laws not- 
withstanding; and if a miner choses to risk his 
preoious neck from day to day in dangerous 
ground or on defective hoisting gear, or with 
bad powder, he will probably do so. But by 
" going after " the proprietors, a partial solu- 
tion to the problem may be had. Still, some 
one must complain of defective arrangements, 
a thing that miners seldom do unless for a 
grudge. As long as they work in the mine 
where such things exist they take them as they 
come, without much comment. 

There are laws now in existence, which, to a 
certain extent, provide for the protection of 
miners as regards outlet from a mine in case of 
fire and in other particulars. They are, how- 
ever, a dead letter in most cases, for we have 
yet to hear of one where infraction of the rules 
has been punished. In a good many mines on 
this coast, rickety old hoisting gear is used for 
hoisting men, which is dangerous in the ex- 
treme; but the owners argue that if anything 
breaks, it will be with a heavy load of ore, not 
men. We are glad to say however, that good, 
secure machinery is the rule on this coast and 
bad machinery the exception. In speaking of 
the punishment of mine owners for keeping 
damaged or insufficient gear, etc., an illustra- 
tion of the method they are dealt with un- 
der the new English Mining Law comes to 
ns in one of our late foreign exchanges. 

A boy was killed by falling down a shaft in 
a colliery. At the inquest it was shown that 
the machinery was of the most antiquated 
description. A gin was erected at the top of 
the shaft, to which was attached a couple of 
ropes, and oars; as the one descended the 
other ascended, communication being made to 
the man on the dump, to set the machinery in 
motion, when required. The man was fre- 
quently absent, and a neighboring quarryman 
discharged his functions, while at other times 
they were done by passers-by. One day the 
boy gave the signal to come up, which was 
answered by some one unknown, and he 
hitched himself in the chains and ascended. 
The weight of the descending car proved too 
heavy a balance, he went up with a surge, and 
on coming in contact with the gin, was pre- 
cipitated down the shaft and killed. The jury 
returned a verdict of manslaughter against the 
proprietor. This is an exceptional case, but 
one warranted to impress mine owners with a 
healthy regard for the lives of their employe's. 
The English mining laws recently passed are 
much more stringent, with regard to these 
particulars, than are ours. One provision 
creates a system for securing the competency 
of managers; another lays down certain general 
rules for the prevention of accidents ; a third 
provides that an amount of ventilation shall 
be produced in every mine, sufficient to dilute 
the noxious gases; a fourth establishes a 
board of inspectors, to see that the various 
provisions are carried out. It is also provided 
that the mines shall be inspected at least once 
in 24 hours, and a regular report made. 



The Concentration of Ores. 

On this coast where low-grade ores are abun- 
dant, and where metallurgical establishments 
are few and far between, our low-grade mines 
are worked but little. Only mines that carry 
ore of a high grade are worked, with but few 
exceptions. Experience has proven, however, 
in older mining countries, that mines with large 
quantities of low-grade ore pay better iu the 
long run than those with " bunches " of rich 
ore. Those mines in Europe which pay the 
largest dividends, derive their profit from the 
masses of their low-grade ore. These facts are 
well known and fully reoognized by every one 
who has had any experience on the subject. It 
is necessary, therefore, in view of these facts 
and the high price of freight on teams and rail- 
roads on the Pacific Coast, that before these 
masses of low-grade ore can be shipped, they 
must be concentrated at the mine where they 
are produced. Thousands of mines now lying 
idle could be worked to profit if an efficient 
concentrator was used to free the ore of the 
lighter gangue, which is so much useless and 
more than useless dead weight in shipping. 
Some of the Colorado mines were of no value 
until this system was adopted, and it will no 
doubt be more generally introduced here when 
better understood. 

Low-grade ores which are now left on the 
dumps of many mines as useless, and are only 
hoisted to get out of the way, oould be made a 
source of wealth to the owners if properly con- 
centrated. Ore that is concentrated will bring 
double its usual value, in consequence of the 
increase of percentage of the metals, and the 
earthy matter having been got rid of the 
smelter can afford to pay higher prices still, 
since it requires comparatively no fluxes. Our 
friend Mr. Henry Sewell, of Salt Lake, has re- 
cently written a letter to the Tribune wherein 
he takes the ground that it is cheaper for the 
miners there to concentrate their ores and sell 




WREN'S ORE CONCENTRATOR. 

them to smelters than to smelt them them- 
selves. In support of his position he says: 

In most countries where extensive min- 
ing has brought about competition among 
smelters of ores, the owners of mines 
have found it more advantageous to sell 
their ore than attempt to smelt it themselves, 
because they cannot compete with the former. 
The cause of this is evident — the smelters 
work on a large scale, and his current expenses 
are subdivided among his many furnaces, and 
consequently he can work at much less cost 
than the miner; besides this the smelter col- 
lects ores for his furnaces from many districts, 
and by so doing provides himself with ores 
that flux each other, whilst the miner as a 
general rule is forced to purchase fluxes, aB he 
can rarely count upon any other ores than 
those supplied by his own mine. The miner 
almost always is compelled to place his fur- 
nace contiguous to his mine, whereas the 
smelter locates his fujgiaces at some central 
point where he can count upon quantity as 
well as quality. 

This is the true source of competition be- 
tween the miner and the smelter, and it is 
therefore manifest that ere long the miners of 
Utah will abandon the idea of smelting their 
own ores. 

We have not the space to go into details 
of this subject as we would like to, but are 
assured that there is little doubt, but that in 
the near future thousands of tons of now 
worthless ore will be concentrated into one- 
half or one-quarter their bulk, by some cheap 
process, and then be made marketable and 
profitable. Water is the best agent for accom- 
plishing this object, the manner of application 
is the only question to be solved. A move in 
this direction has been made by Thomas 
Wren, of Hamilton, Nevada, who has recently 
patented a concentrator of unique design, 
and which though simple in construction 
seems efficient and reliable. A cut showing 
the method employed is herewith shown. 

The concentrator is designed to concentrate 
sulphurets as well as ores. A closed tank, A t 
of any deBired form, is constructed, having a 
hopper, B, supported above it by a short box, 
C, the lower end of which communicates with 
the tank, at or near the centre of its top. A 
small pane of glass, &, is secured in two 
opposite sides of the box, c, so as to serve as 
windows through which the operation can be 



examined from the outside for the purpose of 
regulating the flow of water. A water tank is 
placed at a sufficient height above the tank to 
give the required hydrostatic presure. A 
pipe leads from the water tank to the tank, .1, 
and a cock serves to regulate the flow of 
water through the pipe. 

The powers of concentration are simply as 
follows: the cork is opened so as to allow the 
water from the upper tank to flow through it 
and fill the tank A, the box, C, and the hopper, 
B, and flow off through the spout or sluice 
shown at one Bide of the hopper. The pulver- 
ized ore or pulp is then emptied into the hop- 
per, when the earthy and light particles will 
be carried away through the spout, while the 
heavier particles such as Bulphurets, heavy 
particles of ore, metals, etc., will sink to the 
bottom of the tank, from which they can be 
removed when desired. By examining the 
state of the operation through the windows, 
the exact amount of pressure required to prop- 
erly accomplish the separation of the gangue 
or tailings from the heavier particles, can read- 
ily be arrived at, and the proper pressure reg- 
ulated by means of the cock. By this means 
the light and worthless portions of the pulp 
can be separated from the valuable parts, with 
but little trouble, and by a continuuotts operation; 
of course an apparatus of this kind could be 
run for little expense, as only one man would 
be required to take care of it. The force of 
water can be regulated for different classes of 
ore, and can be adjusted to a nicety by examin- 
ing the process through the little panes of 
glass provided for the purpose. 

As the mining of ores and their reduction 
forms one of the most important branches of 
industry to the Pacific StateB and Territories, 
and as the majority of ores in every country 
are low grade, concentration must be resorted 
to here by some method or other, in order to 
make it profitable to work and ship them. 
Until some cheap and covenient method is ap- 
plied, thousands of tons of profitable ores 
must be idle, and retain their wealth. 



The Virginia Calamity. 

A fearful calamity occurred at Virginia, Ne- 
vada, on the night of the 30th ult., by which 
many liveB were lost and much valuable prop- 
erty was destroyed. A fire which ensued com- 
pleted the work of destruction. The following 
buildings were shattered and partily thrown 
to the ground: Bank of California, and build- 
ings to the rear of it, Kennedy and Mallon's 
grocery store, Douglass' building, used in the 
upper apartment as a lodging house, Daley's 
saloon, and Armory Hall. The cause of the 
accident was doubtless nitro-glycerine. Gen- 
eral Van Bokkelen, who was killed, was local 
agent of several powder companies, and is said 
to have had in the building six cans of nitro- 
glycerine, a quantity of Giant Powder, Hercu- 
les Powder and also some common powder. 
The nitro-glycerine isthought to have exploded 
first and the concussion exploded the Giant 
Powder. We have no definite statements as 
yet in relation to the matter, but there is little 
doubt but that it was the nitro-glycerine that 
caused the explosion. We shall probably be 
able to give further particulars with-regard to 
its origin in our next issue. 

The result would, doubtless, have been 
much more disastrous had the explosion oc- 
curred in the day time instead of at night, as 
the locality was in the center [of the business 
portion of the city. It seems strange that a 
lot of explosive materials of the kind mention- 
ed, should be Jtept stowed in a lodging house 
in a populous town like Virginia. The losses 
by the fire and explosion are put *at about 
$225,000. The killed, as far as known, were 
Major General J. L. Van Bokkelen, J. P. 
Smith, William Davis, B. Mandel, Mrs. Ed. 
Dean and her little daughter, William Low, 
Charles Knox, Mrs. Emily O'Connor and John 
Devine. The wounded were numerous, among 
them are William Spear, Daniel Ingalls, H. 
Hildebrand, George Hill and Mrs. L. A. Taylor. 
A number of firemen were slightly injured 
by falls, falling timbers, parial asphyxiation, 
etc. 

Mr, Chas. H. Knox was connected with the 
Golden State Iron Works of this city. He 
leaves a wife, son and three brothers, and both 
parents living. He was much respected. 

Mr. Knox conversed in a very calm manner 
for some time after the flames had taken hold 
of his lower limbs, and were consuming him 
by inches. He was caught among the fallen 
walls and timbers and after beseeching his 
friends to cut him out, and finding it was im- 
possible for them to do so, he said: "Never 
mind boys, save the others; Billy Lowe is dead 
and Charley is gone also!" and died without a 
murmur. 

We notice, with pleasure, that the money 
donated for the celebration of the 4th of July, 
in both Virginia City and Hamilton, has been 
set aside for the benefit of sufferers in the dis- 
asters at the respective towns. 



gATENTS & 



k NVENTIONS. 



Telegraphio List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 

Prom Official Reports fob the Slnrexo and Scraii- 

tiho Pekbs, DEWEY k CO., Publishers amd 

D. 8. amd Foreign Patent Agents] 

By Special Dispatch, Bated "Washinarton. 
D. C, July 1st, 1873. 

For Wkek Ending June 17th, 1873." 

Steam Plow.— Peter J. McDonald, S. F,, Cal. 

Harrow. — Parmenas N. Woodworth, Stony 
Point, Cal. 

Brake Reaction-Movement. — Horace B. Mar- 
tin, S. F., Cal. 

Coal Screen and Chute. — Martin R. Roberts, 
S. F., Cal. 

•The patents are not ready for delivery by tfce 

Patent Office nntil some 14 days after the date of Issue. 
Note.— Copies of O. B. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., In the BhorteBt time poeslble (by tel- 
egraph or otherwise) at the lowest rateB. All patent 
busineBB for Pacific coast inventors transacted with 
greater security and In much lesB time than by any other 
agoncy. 



Bottle and Can Clamp. — Mr. James N. Car- 
ter, of Virgins City, Nevada, has invented a 
simple, cheap and convenient clamping device, 
for securing cans, bottles and other containing 
vessels upon a platform, counter or shelf so 
that they cannot be shaken down or removed 
without unlocking or releasing the clamp. The 
device is chiefly intended for securing milk 
oans to the bottom or floor of milk wagons, 
thus obviating the necessity of converting the 
wagon bed into a series of compartments as 
usually practiced. In this country of earth- 
quakes, the device will be excellent for prevent- 
ing glassware and bottles from being shaken 
down and broken when the "shake" comes. 
Mr. Carter, has secured protection for his in- 
vention through the Scientific Press Patent 
Agency. 

The New Idria Case. — Here is the latest 
action in the case of the New Idria Quicksilver 
Co., as telegraphed to the city dailies: About 
two years ago the Secretary of the Interior 
denied the application of the New Idria Quick- 
silver Mining Company for a patent for min- 
ing land in California, which is also claimed 
by McGarrahan. The New Idria claimants 
subsequently filed an application for a rehear- 
ing, and no action being taken on it they 
recently requested the Secretary of the Interior 
to refer the whole matter to the Attorney- 
General for final adjudication. This request 
was refused by Secretary Delano, whereupon 
the New Idria claimants appealed to President 
Grant to order such reference. The President 
declined to interfere, and the company's ap- 
plication for a rehearing and their amended 
petition for a patent are still pending before 
the Secretary of the Interior. 

New Dam. — The Nevada Transcript learns 
that the South Yuba Canal Company contem- 
plate the early construction of a dam at 
the lower end of Fordyce, near the site of 
Meadow Lake. The construction of this 
dam will give an abundant supply of water, 
greatly enhance the value of the property, and 
be of great benefit to all mining claims in 
the territory supplied by the canals and ditches 
of the South Yuba Company. 

Nickel. — Everybody wants to find nickel, for 
a mine of it would be immensely valuable. 
Several of the interior papers speak of the 
probability of finding it in their vicinity. News 
now comes from British Columbia to the effect 
that a rich deposit of this mineral has been dis- 
covered near Cowichan. If this is so it will 
not be long before the discoverer finds a pur- 
chaser for his mine or his ore. 



Eureka Mine. — A dispatch from Washington 
states that E. C. Ingersoll has made an argu- 
ment before Solicitor Smith, Acting Secretary 
of the Interior, in behalf of the Eureka Mining 
Company, of California, relative to the time 
within which adverse claims must be filed, 
claiming that the first day of publication should 
be counted as one of the sixty days mentioned 
in the statute. 



More Coal has been found in Contra Costa 
county, at Pine Cation, San Miguel Ranch, 
near Davisville. The vein a few feet from the 
surface is about 10 inches wide. Several coal 
mines iiave also been found in Santa Cruz 
county, at Loami Prieta Mountain, near the 
headwaters of Corallitas creek. The coal is 
said to be of good quality. 

The Owyhee Avalanche thinks the bullion 
shipments from that region this month will 
reach $100,000. 



Daniel Wellington, of Virginia City, Ne- 
vada, is requested to communicate immediately 
with this office. 



10 



MINING A'ND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5, 1873. 



Consumption of Sugar. 

During the past year 83,000,000 pounds of 
sugar was imported to the Pacific coast. Of 
this G5, 500,000 pounds was consumed. There 
was only 1,500,000 pounds of beet sugar man- 
ufactured in the State, by the factories of 
Sacramento and Alvarado, so there is still room 
for eighty-six such factories, giving employ- 
ment to 8,600 operatives for seven months of 
the year— from August until March— not to 
speak of the Chinese, numbering one hundred, 
on the Alvarado Company's farm, where they 
are employed in weeding, hoeing, etc. These 
Chinese are the only hands at present employed 
on the Alvarado farm, and are kept to cultivate 
the young beets. 

The Future Prospects of Beet Culture. 

Although various opinions are entertained 
as to whether or not the growth of beets is 
beneficial to the soil, the prevailing idea is 
that it is attended with good results. Many of 
the farmers in the neighborhood of the mill 
who raised beets for two consecutive years 
and sowed wheat on the third, found the crops 
better than usual. The hoeing necessary to 
the growth of beets effectually clears the 
ground of the luxuriant weeds so detrimental 
to young grain. Every farmer is aware of the 
fact that the soil requires a change in the kind 
of produce it raises. Successive crops of one 
particular variety only impoverish the soil. 

Should the manufacture of beet-sugar be- 
come extensive, the demand for beets will 
probably influence farmers (as in the case of 
those in Alvarado) to resort to their culture as 
a change of crop. The venture of the Alva- 
rado Company has proved eminently success- 
ful, and the farmers of the locality have dis- 
covered that it is possible to raise a very fair 
crop of beets when wheat from excessive 
moisture or drought has entirely failed. The 
prospects of beet culture in this State are ex- 
ceedingly promising, and with the decline of 
cane-sugar manufacture in the arid fields of 
the Southern States, it is not improbable that 
it will ultimately be the source of supply of a 
large portion of the sugar consumed in the 
United States. — Bulletin. 



Farmers' Anti-Monopoly Movement. 

An Illinois paper, commenting [upon the 
election of Craig, the farmers' candidate for 
Judge of the Supreme Court, says that that 
election is only an incident in the movement. 
It is not the end aimed at, nor the beginning 
of the end. It serves only to draw the divid- 
ing lines distinguishing those who are heartily 
in sympathy with the anti-monopoly move- 
ment, from those who tremblingly gave it a 
quasi endorsement, not daring to take a posi- 
tive stand on either side. The farmers have 
no idea of stopping their action with this elec- 
tion; indeed, no one thought of this election 
when they began operations; but they will go 
on until they elect a Legislature, Governor, 
members of Congress, and a President, if need 
be, if their objects are not attained otherwise. 
They are fully aware that it would be conven- 
ient, in a great movement of this kind, to have 
"friends at court;" to have men in public 
positions who are in sympathy with them, and 
will render them assistance in organizing and 
keeping together. Hence they will endeavor 
to see that the various county offices, to., be 
filled next fall, are supplied with men who 
have already proved to be with them in senti- 
ment and sympathy. 



Hoisting Machinebt in Salt Lake. — The 
Alta correspondent at Salt Lake says : It is the 
liveliest camp he has struck yet. Everywhere 
he meets strangers from the East and not a 
few notable speculators from the Bay, bargain- 
ing for mines. The great want is mills and 
furnaces. Mr. Howland, late of the Miners' 
Foundry, has associated with Eastern capital- 
ists, to put up a custom mill of 20 stamps at 
Palace Park, 28 miles from Salt Lake. It is 
well understood that San Francisco is the saf- 
est place to get reliable milling works. The 
contract has been awarded to Messrs. Bordwell 
& Malter, constructing engineers. It is to be 
in all respects a first-class silver mill. 

Gold Diggings are being worked by Russians 
and Norwegians in Lapland, but strange to 
say, no "Old Californi a miners" have as yet 
passed their opinions on the diggins, there be- 
ing no Americans there. The ubiguity of "old 
49ers" is so proverbial that it is strange none 
of them have visited Lapland yet. 

Thk shaft in the Gwin mine, Calaveras 
County, is now down 700 feet, the contract for 
sinking 100 feet below the 600 feet level hav- 
ing been finished. The last hundred feet 
finished is spoken of as a masterpiece of 
workmanship. The mine is yielding well. 

Michigan Capitalists have invested over 
- $600,000 in Utah mines and will shortly erect 
five smelting furnaces on a 40*acre tract near 
Salt Lake City. 



The Wheat Crop. 

A special Washington dispatch to the Chicago 
Tribune, under date of June 13th says: Ac- 
counts are now in from enough of the wheat- 
growing States to show that the crop of this 
year will, in all probability, be less than half 
what it was last year. In Western New York, 
and in fact along the lake region of the coun- 
try, the winter wheat is, as might have been ex- 
pected from the unusual severity of the past 
season, atmost a total failure. Other crops 
have also been severely injured by the late 
spring. The long-continued wet weather pre- 
vails in Iowa, and the crops are suffering great- 
ly. 

There is every reason to believe that, with the 
exception of the fruit crops, all others will be 
very short, the deficiency being especially 
heavy in cereals. In fact, 1873 will probably 
be the worst year we have had since the begin- 
ning of the war. The wheat crop is already 
being harvested in the Southern States, and as 
far north as the Shenandoah Valley. In some 
cases it has been very fair, but by the time the 
great belt of the Central States is reached it is 
believed that the falling off of the crop will be 
such as will astonish the country, and affect 
the financial situation. 

Scarcity of Wateb is felt at the mills on 
the Soven-mile and other canons near Virginia 
City, and surplus ore is accumulating. On the 
completion of the water works now being con- 
structed by the Virginia and Gold Hill Water 
Co., this want will not be felt. 



Late experiments render it probable that 
the cost of manufacturing magnesium, so 
much in use for photographic and illuminating 
purposes, will shortly be reduced to such a 
degree that it can probably be sold for three or 
four dollars per pound. 

Estimated Yield. — A number of gentlemen 
connected with the mining interests, estimate 
that the daily ore supply of the mines about 
Salt Lake City, will be after July 1st, 700 tons, 
of which Little Cottonwood will yield 200 
tons. 



Coppee Reduction works are to be erected at 
Golden, Colorado, by a company, who were 
induced to do so by the existence of copper 
ores in Jefferson County in quantities suffi- 
ciently large to pay for working. 



Over 65,000 bars of Cerro Gordo bullion 
passed over the Los Angeles and Wilmington 
railroad last year, and the Los Angeles Star 
says there will be a material raise in the figure 
this ensuing year. 



Pumping and Hoisting machinery has been 
bought for the Santa itosa Coal mine, Sonoma 
county. The mine is said to be producing an 
excellent quality of coal. 



A Bar has been found in a canon near San 
Rafael, Lower California, which is rich in pla- 
cer gold. No work can be done on it until the 
rainy season sets in. 



Work has been commenced on a new 
recently discovered about 8 miles below Burn- 
side, San Bernardino county. The ledge is 4 
feet wide and shows free gold. 



The coal area of China is estimated at 
97,000 square miles, and the area of coal 
lands in the United States is said to be 120,000 
square miles. 

Coal of good quality has been discovered at 
Pancake about 15 miles from Hamilton, White 
Pine, Nevada. It is important to the smelters 
at Eureka. 

An Extension of the Golden Chariot, the 
crack mine of San Diego county, has been 
struck, the croppings of which are large and 
rich. 

The Idaho mine in Nevada county last week 
cleaned up $26,000 from six days' work, with 
35 stamps. 

The Bullion shipment from Eureka, Nev., 
on the 19th, was 50,000 pounds — two and a 
half car loads. 



The Gold Hill tailings mill has completed 
its first run and clean-up, $596, in four days' 
run. 



The Salt Lake Stock Board which was to 
have been opened in June, has not as yet been 
heard from. 



The furnaces about Eureka, Nevada, use 
8,400 bushels of coal per day. 

The New Quartz mill on the Vulture mine, 
Oregon, is doing well. 



Working Low Grade Ores. 

This question, says the Salt Lake Tribune, 
is one of vital interest as touching the future 
welfare of the Territory, and demands all the 
attention which can be bestowed upon it by 
those interested in the development of our 
mineral resources. It is therefore necessary 
the ingenuity of man be exercised in searching 
out some economical plan by which the great 
bulk can be utilized. The experience of men 
well versed in mining matters is that nine-tenths 
of the ores in Utah are not of more than the 
average value of $40 per ton. 

In our opinion, the first step to be taken to- 
wards bringing about the desideratum in ques- 
tion is to separate the gangue from the pure 
ore, and thereby secure the greatest value in 
the smallest compass; and the second step is 
to discover some description of furnaoe which 
shall be simple in construction, efficient in its 
operation, inexpensive to build, and that will 
smelt the concentrated ore at a heat that will 
not incur a loss by volatilization. 

The present methods of smelting low grade 
ores, especially those that are very rebellious 
require so much heat and consequent large 
consumption of fuel, causing thereby so much 
loss in both lead and silver, through oxidation 
and volatilization, that no profits can be re- 
alized, but, on the contrary, losses are sus- 
tained. 

Experiments in separation and concentration 
were made in the month of March of the present 
year on ores from the Be Soto mine, Humboldt 
county, Nevada. The ore contained from three 
to five per cent, of base metal, principally an- 
timony, also some lead and zinc; the silver 
mostly occurred as a black sulphuret. The 
assay value in silver was about $54 to the ton . 

The following results of the treatment of the 
ore by three different methods are of interest 
to the mining and scientific world: 

First. By amalgamation (stamp-mill) pro> 
cess, the loss was to such an extent as not to 
allow any margin at all for the expense of 
working. 

Second. By the most approved method of 
wet concentration seventy-five per cent, of the 
silver was lost and the twenty-five per cent. 
saved for final treatment was not sufficient to 
pay expenses. 

Third. By Krom's dry crushing and 
dry concentrating process over ninety five 
per cent, of silver was saved, and the result 
produced was over $1,000 in silver to the 
ton of concentrated ore from the original, 
which contained in bulk only $54 of silver to 
the ton. 

The expense of the Krom system is said to 
be less than any other mode in use. 

So much for the first step in our theory. 
We next come to the question of improved 
furnaces. 

There are two new processes which are invit- 
iog public attention. 

One is the "Stevens Oxy-hydrogen Furnace,' 
the inventor of which claims that at a very 
trifling expense in fuel a very intense heat can 
be obtained. Any description of fuel may be 
used, petroleum, coal tar, coal or wood burn 
equally well. A large furnace on this plan has 
been erected at Eureka, Nevada, and the owner 
of it claims that he can smelt ore at $15 per 
ton, a reduction of about fifty per cent, on for- 
mer rates. Another of less size has also been 
built at Sandy Station of the U. S. Eailroad, 
but neither of them yet have demonstrated 
that what is claimed for them can be per- 
formed. 

Another process is that of smelting in vacu- 
um. By this plan it is argued that volatiliza- 
tion and oxydation are avoided. A very great 
saving in fuel is effected, and much better re- 
sults can be obtained by the process than by a 
blast or draft of air. 

We have taken great pains to inquire into 
the merits of the various improvements now 
being introduced, and Bhall through our col- 
umns continue to inform our readers of what is 
passing in the development of plans that have 
for their end the bringing about of that impor- 
tant desideratum the utilization of our low 
grade ores. 

Assyrian Besearch. — Th$ following telegram 
has been received by the proprietors of the 
Daily Telegraph, from Mr. George Smith: I am 
excavating the site of the King's Library, at 
Nineveh, which I found without much diffi- 
culty. Many fresh objects of high importance 
have rewarded my search. Since my last mes- 
sage, I have come upon numerous valuable in- 
scriptions and fragments of all classes, in- 
cluding very curious syllabaries and bilingual 
records. Among them is a remarkable table of 
the penalties for neglect or infraction of the 
laws. But my most fortunate discovery is that 
of a broken tablet, containing the very portion 
of the text which was missing from the Deluge 
tablet. Immense masses of earth and debris 
overlie whatever remains to be brought to light 
in this part of the great mound. Much time 
and large sums of money would be required to 
lay it open. I therefore wait instructions from 
yon and the Museum, as the season is closing. 

Madder. — The Alta says, John L. Beard, 
Esq., has.growing on his farm at Centerville, 
across the bay, about one acre of rnadder, the 
root of which is used for dyeing purposes. The 
seed was brought by Mr. Beard from Holland 
to be used as an experiment, which so far 
appears most successful. We are informed 
that no other attempt has been made to culti- 
vate the plant in this State. 



Something about the Carson River.— From 
Mr. S. E. Jones of Empire we gather the ma- 
terials for the following facts and figures: The 
amount of wood now coming out of the ditch, 
going over the dam and coming down the river 
may be put down in round numbers at say 65,- 
000 cords Of this amount, 15,000 cords go 
over the dam and down to Dayton; the balance 
remaining in Empire. This fifty thousand 
cords are owned by various parties, Messrs, 
Smith & Jones being the largest owners. This 
drive is brought down under contract by 
Messrs Bryant & Flanders, and is coming on 
prosperously. Hitherto ten hours has been a 
day's work by the men employed in taking 
the wood out of the ditch ; but from this on 
until the wood is all on the bank sixteen hours 
will be a days's work — that is, from 4 in the 
morning till 8 in the evening. It is hardly 
correct, though, to call this a day's work, for 
it conveys a wrong impression; we should say, 
more properly, that the shifts will be off and 
on during the hours indicated. The water is 
falling very rapidly under the influence of 
this wram weather — falling more than an inch 
a day. This, it is thought, will soon reduce 
the power and bullion producing capacity of 
the larger Carson river mills — the Mexican, 
Brunswick and Eureka, though it probably 
won't make much difference with the smaller 
ones. Present appearances indicate that the 
river will be lower this year than for some sea- 
sons past. The wood drivers will be lucky if 
they get^ their contracts completed without any 
serious mishaps. — Carson Appeal. 

The "Garidaldi " Ledge. — A corresponden 
writes us as follows concerning this mine : It 
is situated near^ EobinBon's Ferry, Calaveras 
county, California, is turning out a large quan- 
tity of high grade ore. It is worked through a 
tunnel, 152 feet long, cutting two bodies of ore 
aggregating 13 feet in width, parted by a six 
inch clay seam, the head wall having a gouge 
of twelve inches, soft and wet. Average ore 
from the east vein pulps over thirty dollars 
per ton, free gold. From appearances there is 
sufficient ore above the line of the tunnel to 
run a forty-stamp mill five years. Water 
power is abundant and cheap, the Stanislaus 
river crossing the vein at each end of the claim. 
Messrs. Rogers and Lewis, who are opening 
the mine, have 160 acres of timber land and a 
beautiful mill site adjoining their property. 
The knowing ones in that vicinity are highly 
pleased with the quantity and grade of ore in 
sight. 

A New Chlorinizing and Desulphurizing 
Furnace. — A new chlorinizing and desulphur- 
izing furnace has recently been invented by 
one Thomas McGlew, of Austin, Nevada, 
which promises to eclipse the Stetefeldt and 
all other furnaces for the roasting of ores. 
The Virginia Chronicle speaks of it as follows: 
The entire cost of putting one in running order 
will not exceed $2,000. It can be run twenty- 
four hours by three men, one on each shift of 
eigtyt hours each. The heat can be regulated 
to suit all kinds of ores, and this is the only 
kind of furnace in which the heat can be in- 
creased or diminished as required. The cost 
of roasting ores by this furnace will not ex- 
ceed $4 per ton, and it is guaranteed to chlo- 
rinize all ore as high as 95 per cent, of the 
assay value. Should the furnace be adopted 
here, a saving of millions of dollars will be 
made annually, as now only from 60 to 65 per 
cent is saved. 

A Cheap Paint. — The American Agriculturist 
of a recent date, says: — About seven years ago, 
a Mr. Wheeler, of this place, built a bridge for 
the town, which he painted with the following 
composition: — Water lime (hydraulic lime) 
mixed with skimmed milk to the consistance 
of common paint. It was put on with a short 
handled whitewash brush; eight or ten quarts 
were applied. It can be shaded by addition of 
various coloring matters to suit the taste or 
fancy. The bridge was painted seven years 
ago. I pass it almost weekly, and I supposed 
it was covered with lead paint till told to the 
contrary. This paint is adapted to coarse, 
rough out-door work, and out-buildings which 
are covered with unplained boards. There 
are a number of barns in this vicinity painted 
with this mixture ; they have a rather neat ap- 
pearance in contrast with those not painted. 
The cost is but little; the lime can be procured 
for $6 to $9 per barrel, Those who have used 
it, speak well of it. Any one can put it on 
with a whitewash brush. 



S-A-IV FRANCISCO 

Journal of Commerce 

—AND— 

MERCANTILE DIRECTOR. 

Wc desire to draw public attention toithe fact that the 
" Pacific Ooast Mehgantile Director " is now known 
as the San Francisco Journal of Commerce and 
Mercantile Director." 

It i-i a new 8-page monthly newspaper, of special in- 
formation for wholesale and retail tradesmen. It also 
contains reading matter of interest and Importance to all 
business and professional men on the coast. 

OUR TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Comprises FuU Prices Current and Monthly Review of 
the "wholesale Markets; Diagrams of the Fluctuations of 
the Wheat Markets; Rates of Ocean Freight— corrected 
monthly ; Illustrations and Sketches of Prominent Men 
and Buildings; Editorials on Manufaoturing and Industrial 
Progress; Departments containing appropriate reading 
matter and reviews for various branches of trade, including 
"Grocery and Provision;" "DryGoodB;" "Drugs;" "Build- 
ing;" "Trades and Manufactures," etc, eto. 

Our first issues consist of 8 pages, embracing FORTY- 
EIGHT COLUMNS of important reading matter f orTrades- 
men — mostly original and by first-class writers. Sample 
copies, post paid, 10 cts. Yearly subscription, in advance, 
$1.50. Subscribers to the Mining and Scientific Pbesb or 
the Pacific Ruhal Pbehs will be Bnpplied at half price. 

Published by MTJBRA'2". DEWEY & OO. f 

At the Publishing Office of the Mining and Scientific Press 
and Pacific Rural Press, San Francisoo, 



July 5, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS- 



11 



Scientific Press 



^tt&t 4i©a@? 





Ocn U. 8. asd FonEiON Patent Agenot presentt 
many and Important advantages as a Home Agency over 
ail others by reasons of long establishment, great expe- 
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All worthy inventions patented through our Agency will 
have the benefit of an Illustration or a description in the 
Mining and Sotenttfio Phess. We transact every 
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civilised countries. The large majority of U. 8. and 
Foreign Patents granted to inventors on the Pacific 
Coast have been obtained through our Agency. We can 
give the best and mont reliable advice as to the patenta- 
bility of new inventions. Advice and Ctbcuiaahs fbee. 

DEWEY & CO., 

Pabllahera, Patent Amenta, and Engraver*. 

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Scientific and Practical Books 
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Published or issued, wholesale and Retail, by DEWEY 
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BY GUIDO KUSTEL, 

Mining Engineer and Metaixtthgibt. 

Boasting of Gold and Silver Ores, and the 

Extraction of their Respective Metals without Quick- 
silver. 1870. 

This rare book on the treatment of gold and silver 
ores without quicksilver, is liberally illustrated and 
crammed full of facts. It gives short and concise de- 
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It contains 142 pages, embracing illustrations of fui- 
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It is a work of great merit, by an author whose repu- 
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Price $2.50 coin, or $3 currency, postage free. 



Concentration of Ores (of all tinds) , in- 
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Sulphurets, Arseniurets, and Gold and Silver Ores 
generally, with 120 Lithographic Diagrams. 1867. 
This work Is unequaled by any other published, em- 
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Nevada and California Processes of Silve* 

and Gold Extraction, for general use, and especially 
for the Mining Public of California and Nevada, with 
full explanations and directions for all metallurgies 
operations connected with Bilver and gold from a pre 
limlnary examination of the ore to the final cas tin 
of the ingot. Also, a description of the general metal- 
lurgy of silver ores. 1864. 

As its title indicates, this work gives a wide range oi 
information, applicable to all vein miners and workers 
in precious metals, affording hints and assistance of ex- 
ceeding value to both the moderately informed and the 
moBt expert operator. 
Price, $5 in cloth; $6 In leather— coin. 



BY OTHEB. AUTHORS. 
The Quartz Operator's Hand-Book; by P. 

M. Randall. 1871. ReviBed and Enlarged Edition. 
Cloth bound, 176 pageB. Price, $2. 

Sulphurets: "What They Are, How Con- 
centrated, How Assayed, and How Worked: with n 
Chapter on the Blow-Pipe AsBay of Minerals. By 
Wm. M. Barstow, M. D.; 1867; cloth bound, 114 pages. 
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by Dewey & Co., Mining and Scientific Press 
office, 8. F. Bound in cloth. Price, (very 
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Valuable Premiums I Subscriptions. 



A Sewing Machine 
of Real Value 

.Beck wilh'si 
given for $40 
worth of Sub- 
scriptions. 



The Am. i hij-i. tn spcnkiiiK of ilm Ma- 

chine, says: 
We are prepared to indorse the BeokwlbhSewlng Machine 

us one worthy ol Ix-ln* ut < I'.v all who cannot 

purchase the oxpunslvo machinus. 

]-!. It is wi- 1 ind scroittfly mudc. 

2d, It le easily Attached to any table or stand having u 
leaf or edge projecting an inch or bo, ami can UiUB be Uaed 
in any partof the hoanc, near a windi.w, i»ie. 

3d. It makes theeladiic loup HiU-lutho sumo m the Will- 
cox A Glbbw and aomo other goml machine- '. which with a 
In tie cure In lu.iking thi? closing stiuh is « lunula ully strong 
for near yall kinds of sewing, and less llaMe to break In 
«;i-hmn and wearinjr,owingf > Its elasticity. 

WE WILL GIVE 

' <jr$12, a Machine and the Illustrated Press, 1 year. 
For $12, a Machine and the Mining .4 Scientific Pre^s. Smos. 
For 12, a Maebine and the Pacific Rural Press, 6 nios. 
For$13..W.a Machine and the SI inmg A Scientific Press, 1 yr. 
For $13.50, a Machine and the Pacific Rural Press, 1 year. 

For $40, we will give a Machine and $40 
worth of subscriptions to either paper or 
all jointly at reg-uiar rates. Send for Cir- 
cular. 

Express charges niust be paid by the purchaser. Ad- 
dress, for further particulars, the PUBLISHERS OF 
THIS JOURNAL. 



A. CARD. 

The subscriber offers his services to the public for 
the examination of mincB and mining properties. This 
State abounds in quartz mining properties, which are 
present failures from the want of knowledge in their 
development or management. Witness Nevada, El Do- 
rado, Tuolumne and Mariposa counties; witness also 
Amador county with its Potosi, Beaton, Hnzard, Ply- 
mouth, El Dorado, Original Amador, Herbertville, 
Union, Mahoney, Summit and other gold mining prop- 
erties, all of which are intrinsically first-claBS mines, 
yet all of the above and others in that county are pres- 
ent failures. 

But their successful development depends upon 
Geology, Orology, Topography, a knowledge of "the 
Chemistry of Rocks and their relations to mines and 
mining," an apprehension of Nature's great plan of 
their development: in short, the mathematics of mining. 

In the above respect, the subscriber believes himself 
thoroughly master of the situation. Consultation free. 

Ofhce, 543 Sacramento Btreet, one door east of Mont- 
gomery. O. W. EASTON, 

Geologist and Mining Engineer. 

San Francisco, June 17, 1873. jn21-4t 



FAIRBANKS 




THE ONLiY BBLIABLE 

STANDARD. 



6,000 to 40,000 pounds capacity. Length of 
platform to suit purchaser. The same scale is used for 
weighing cattle, hogs, etc. Scales adapted to all 
branches of business. Address 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 

637 Market street. 
Agents for MILES' ALARM MONET DRAWERS, a 
sure protection against till thieves. 16v26eowbp6m 



OAKET & SON'S EMERY AND BLACK 
LEAD MILLS, Blackfriar's Road, London, England. 

OAKEY'S WELLINGTON KNIFE POLISH. 
Packets, 3d. each ; tins, <M„ is., 2a. 6d.. and 4b. each. 

OAKEY'S INDIA RUBBER KNIFE 
BOARDS from la. 6d. each. 

OAKEY'S SILVERSMITHS' SOAP (NON 
(MERCURIAL), for Cleansing and Polishing Silver, Elec- 
tro-plate. Plate-glass, Marble, etc. Tablets, 6d. eaoh. 

OAKEY'S GENUINE EMERY, GRAIN 
AND FLOUR. 

OAKEY'S EMERY AND GLASS CLOTH. 

OAKEY'S CABINET GLASS PAPER, 
BLACK LEAD. etc. 

OAKEY'S GOODS SOLD EVERYWHERE 
by Ironmongers, Grocers, Oilmen, Brnshmakers, Drug- 
liuta. etc 21v25-ly 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMONDPOINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest state of perfection, are prepared to nil orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRLLLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices. Abundant testimony furniBhed of 
the great economy and successful working of numerous 
machines In operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on this coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE & CO. 

Office, No. 315 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
24v26-tf 



MONTGOMERY'S HOTEL, 

227 and 229 Second street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This Hotel has been newly furnished, and is situated in a 

central and healthy location, and is one of the few 

Hotels in San Francisco conducted on 

Temperance Principles. 

BOABD, PER WEEK, $3.50. BOARD AND LODGING, 94 TO $5. 

SIX 1IEA I, TICKETS FOB $1. 

CKAS. MOXTOOMEEY, Proprietor. 

JJ5F* Passengers and Baggage taken to the Hotel free. -®ft 
8v26-awbp 



Send this paper to your friends abroad. 



BROWN'S PATENT LAMP 




One of these Lamps, when placed at a distance of 200 
feet from the bank, will light up a bank Burface 250 feet 
in length and 150 feet high, and to a much better ad- 
vantage than any other light heretofore tried, and at an 
exponse not to exceed five cents per hour. Lamps 
furnished at short notice. 

Letter of Recommendation. 

Mn. C. B. BnowN— Sm : Tour Patent Lamp for light- 
ing hydraulic mines, which you sold to me in December 
last, has given entire satisfaction, and far exceeds my 
expectations, and I think it the best and cheapest light 
ever used to light mining claimB by night, and am sat- 
isfied that I have saved three hundred dollars by the 
use of it in the last mining season over pitch or any 
other light of the same brilliancy; and I will also say 
that if I could not get another lamp, five hundred dol- 
lars would not buy it. Tours, 

W. D. APLIN. 

Little York, Nov. 5, 1872. 

For further particulars, address, 

fe22-tf C. B. BROWN, Placerville, Cal. 

P. J. PHILLIPS & CO., No. 608 Clay Btreet, near 
Montgomery, San Francisco, are agents for Brown's 
Lamp, where it may be seen. 



Polishing and Fluting Iron. 




This new invention takes the place of two articles 
needed in nearly every house. As a POLISHING IRON 
it has no superior. The part used for Fluting is made 
of brass, and highly polished. A Receipt for making 
Fbench Glossing Staboh, that gives a superior polish, 
goes with each iron. The Polishing Iron and Fluter, 
being in one, are both heated at the Bame time. We are 
now prepared to furnish them in quantities to suit. 
Price, $3. 

WIESTER & CO., 
17 New Montgomery Btreet, San Francisco, 
General Agents for Pacific Coast. 



The California Powder Works 

Mo. 814, OALIFOENIA 8TKBRT, 

SAN FBANCISOO. 
Manufacturers and have constantly on band 
SPORTmG, 

And BLA TING 

POWDER, 

Of SUPERIOR QUALITY, FRESH FBOM THi 
MILLS. It being constantly received and transported 
into the interior, is delivered to the consumer within a 
few days of the time of its manufacture, and is in every 
way superior to any other Powder in Market. 

We have been awarded successively 

Three Gold T-JCetl^vls 

By the MECHANICS" INSTITUTE and the STATE AQ- 
RIOULTURAL SOCIETY for the superiority of our 
products over all others. 
We also call attention to our 

HERCULES POWDER. 

Which combines all the force of other strong explosive 
now in use, and the lifting force of the best blasting 
powdeb, thus making it vastly superior to any other 
pompound now in use. 

A circular containing a full description of this Pow- 
der can be obtained on application to our Office. 

16v20-8m JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

Froiseth's New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

MAP OF TXTAJH. 

Size, 40 by 56 Inches ; Scale, 8 Miles to an Inch. 

Handsomely engraved on stone, colored In counties, 
and mounted on cloth, showing the Counties, Towns, 
Rivers, Lakes, Railroads, Mines and Mining Districts 
throughout the Territory, and all Govehnment Subvets 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8; Pocket form, $5. 
Mailed to any part of the United States, on receipt of 
price, by A. L.BANCROFT & CO., 721 Market street, 
San Francisco, Cal., or by R. A. M. FROISETH, Pub- 
lisher, Salt Lake City, Utah. 10v2B-tf 



Directory. 



Memo Spring— Manufacturer of the Dr. 

lilv Artificial Limbs, has removed from 101 JeBsie street 
to 166 Tehama airoot. near northeast corner of Third and 
Tehiiraa. and between Howard and Folsoin streets. Atl 
dre^aMunZo Spring, IG6 Tehama St., San FrauolBCo, Cal. 



DR AIKIN M * Keamyst.. N. E. cor. Call- 



^Bli^H "-"" ""*"*< at., 8. P., oures Oatorrh, 

^T ^V Deafness, Ear Discharges, Deformities, and 

V| Wf all l',. . l/.>r, Lung, Llver.Kidnoy.Blood.Nerve. 

^ W ' bronio, Soecjt. and Men's Diseases. Friendly 

^» ailviee; akilltnl treatment for all Invalids. 

▼ Medicines supplied. Hours, 10 to 4 and 6 to 8. 

Call or write. Ladies, married or single, speedily cared of 

any ill health. 23v26 



H. C. BENNETT, 
JBTATISTIOIA.1V. 

Reports and estimates made about all departments ol 
Production, Commerce, and Manufacture, of the Pacific 
Coast. 5v2+-tf 



RICHARD H, STRETCH, Civil Engineer, 



City nnd County Surveyor. 



Offlc— Room 16, City Hall. 



01LRB H. 0H1T. 



JIML" H. HAVKM. 



GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 

to Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. E. corner Oalt* 

r omlaanc Leldesdorfl streets, 

8AK FRANOIOO. 

JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Monte-ornery Street, 
8. W. corner Sacramento. 



WW. BABTI.ING. 



HEWRT KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Balers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

505 Clay street, (southwest cor. SaoBOme), 
LCvl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. F. PAGES, 

SEAL DES N G R A. S> E R , 

AND LETTER CTTTIK, 
Brssa and Steel Stamps and Dies, «08 Sacramento street, 
San Francisco. Orders by express promptly attended to. 

J. M. STOCKMAKT, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS AND MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt'fl Brass Foundry) , 

N. W. corner Natoma and Fremont streets, S. F. En- 
trance on Natoma street. 



San Francisco Cordage Company. 

Established 1856. 
We have inst added a large amount of new machlners' of 
he latest und moat improved kind, and are again prepared 
o III I ordera lor Rope or any spec al lengths ;mt.l uizes. Con- 
stantly on hand a Urge stock of Minilu Rope, all sizes; 
Tarred Manila Rope; Hay Rope; Whale Line, etc., etc 

TTTBBS & CO., 

17v26-tf 611 and 613 Front street, San Francisco. 



The Merchants 7 Exchange Bank 

OF SAN FJRAIVCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

LETI STEVENS President. 

R.N, VAN BRUNT OaBhler. 

BANKING HOUSE, 

No. 416 California Btreet, San Francisco. 

25v20-qy 

DR. ABORN, 
Physician and Operating Surgeon 

FOB CHRONIC DISEASES. 
213 GEARY STREET, .... SAN FRANCISCO. 
Diseases of a chronic and obstinate character, espec- 
ially such cases as have for years, or a lifetime, resisted 
the ordinary modes of treatment, are the class of mala- 
dies in the treatment of which Dr. Aborn has become 
pre-eminent on the Pacific Coast, as well as throughout 
the Union, and by his success has acchieved for binr 
self an enviable reputation. 23v25<ly 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STHELPBNa 
Sold by all Dealers throughonttha World. 



13t26-ly 



CHAELES P. KIKCHNEK, 

Sampler and Crusher of Ores, 

NO. .11 DBUMM STREET, 

San Francisco. 



PATRICK GIBBONS, 

Sole Proprietor for the Pacific States and Territories, of 
VAN PAPPELENDAM'S PATENT 

Metallic Roofing and Wall Tiles, 

(Patented June 13th, 1871.) 

Ban Fhanoisco Office — At Messrs. Thanob & Kn ox , 
513 California street. 
EEsroESOE— 308 Tenth street, Oakland, Oal. Jn21 -3 m 



12 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5, i8 73 . 



(Continued from Page 5.) 

ft. on the ledge with good indications— Bhowing ore In 
bunches. Work is being steadily prosecuted. 

Raymond Extension. — This mine is situated near the 
Portsmouth; incline down 40 ft. ; showing some ore. 
Working one shift. 

Andes. — In the same locality as the Raymond Exten- 
sion and Portsmouth; incline down 55 ft. and showing a 
well-defined ledge with bunches of ore. Driving ahead 
all the time. 

At/ph. — The drift from the main shaft is now In 235 
ft. without cutting the ledge. From the 164-ft. level 
rich ore is being constantly extracted. The vein at thiB 
point is 2 ft. wide, a portion of which, however, is not 
considered rich enough to mill at present. 

Mazeppa. — The hoisting works are nearly completed, 
and if nothing takes place to prevent it, another whistle 
will be added to our noisy Bteam choir on Monday next. 
The works are first-class in every respect. Sinking on 
the main shaft will be resumed a s fast as the hoisting- 
works are ready. 

Raymond and Ely.— The usual amount of ore is be- 
ing extracted and shipped with the Bame uniformly 
good returns in the shape of bullion. 

Pabiam,— The incline on the ledge is down 100 ft., 
with a drift from the bottom of 30 ft., showing good 
mineral all the way. Work, which has been suspended 
on this mine for some time, will soon he renewed. 

Peavtnk.— Siill shipping ore from this mine. The 
usual number of men employed and character of ores 
unchanged. We have seen some extraordinarily rich 
ore from this mine lately. 

Havana.— Incline shaft 200 ft. deep. Ledge in the 
bottom between 8 and 9 ft. wide, 2 ft. of which iB ex- 
tremely rich, the balance being low grade ore of good 
milling quality. The rich streak is steadily increasing 
In size as depth is attained. Five or six tone of high 
grade ore on the dump, and fifteen to twenty tons 
low grade. Still sinking. 

Nobth Stab. — ThiB new and promising mine is now 
down 16 ft. in the shaft. The vein holds its width and 
richness. 

Washington and Cbeolk. — Shipped last week $6,300 
—next week will ship between $6,000 and $7,000— ship- 
ments will hereafter be made weekly. They are now 
taking out about 10 tons a day — an average assay from 
which shows $150 to the ton. Another winze 
is being sunk, from which drifts are being 
run eaBt and west, the ledge averaging 2 ft. in width 
from top to bottom. In stoping up from the drift to 
the ledge, the average width in the slopes is about 3 ft. 
This stope is 70 ft. long — running,' east and west from 
the main drift. Prospecting for new developments is 
going on as heretofore. The outlook of this mine was 
never better than at present. The June shipment will 
will be at least $30,000. 

Chief op the Hill. — Have raised from the 150-ft. 
level — Wright's shaft— 50 ft., and intend to drift there- 
from to connect with the Chief of the Hill East. Be- 
fore making the connection, they expect, from previous 
indications, to strike a large body of ore. 

Silveb Peak. — The ore struck in the vein in the 
stopes is wider and richer than before. In one of the 
ore breasts this streak is 3 ft. wide— good milling ore, 
better than the last sent to the mill. 

WASHOE. 

Beloheb.— Daily yield 500 tons, about 155 of which 
comes from the 1,300 or lowest level, through the Tel- 
low Jacket shaft. The main south drift at this level Is 
in 280 ft. from the Crown Point line, with the face still 
in flue ore. The cross-cut east from the Bill floor, 100 
ft. from the Crown Point line, and the cross-cut east 
from the fourth floor above, 70 ft. from the Cown Point 
line, are both in over 100 ft. from the east side of the 
oro stopes, aud still show spots of ore. This level thus 
far Bhows better than either of the levels above, all of 
which, however, are looking aud holding out finely. 
At the I,200-ft. level the cross-cut east shows 39 ft. of 
flue ore, which bids fair to open out into a large body. 
The main incline is now down below the 1,300-ft- level. 
A station is being opened for that level, and the in- 
cline will be continued downward as soon as the sta- 
tion is opened and the drift north fairly started. 

Savage.— The south winze from the 1600 to to 1700- 
ft. levels made the connection last Wednesday, giving 
a much-needed circulation of pure air, cooling off the 
1700-ft. level, and affording an opportunity of cross- 
cutting the ledge and developing the real value of that 
level. The north drift on the 1600-ft. level, having 
onade connection with the Gould & Curry, also gives a 
flue chance to prospect the large body of virgin ground 
that lies between the 1500 and 1600-ft. levels in that 
part of the mine. 

Senatob. — 12 ft. have been added to the depth of the 
shaft this week, making it now 36G ft. deep. Some 
water is coming In at the north side of the .shaft . It is 
of a milky color and quite warm. There is not enough 
of it, however, to give any trouble. The east side of 
the shaft shows the most quartz coming in. It is of fine 
quality. An asseessment of 50 cents a share, amounting 
to $12,000, was levied last Tuesday. 

Cbown PorNT.— Owing to the bad luck with the ma- 
chinery, tho ore production for the last week or two has 
not been up to the average, and what wag taken out 
came from the 1000 andl200-ft. levels, where the ore is of 
lower grade than at the 1300-ft. level. ThiB difficulty is 
now obviated, the machinery being all right once more 
and in good running condition. The cross-cut eaBt of 
the 1300-ft. level, after paBsiug through a rich streak of 
ore 14 ft. wide, 66 ft, from the drift, has gone on some 
23 ft. beyond, in porphyry and quartz, that gives low 
assays. The cross-cut east, at the lower or 1400-ft. level 
is in 65 ft., with the face still in solid white quartz, giv- 
ing low assayB. 

Dayton. — The rock in the face of the main west 
tunnel, at the 225-ft. level, is much softer than at our 
laBt report, and admits of much better speed in the 
progress of the work. The same heavy and extensive 
quartz ledge which was opened and developed at the 
upper level of this miue in 1864-5, is found to extend 
to the lower level now being worked. It Is much more 
concentrated, however, and contains more good ore. 
It is over 100 ft. in width. The Dayton is one of the 
most valuable mines along the great main lode. 

Consolidated Virginia. — Sinking the shaft 1b mak- 
ing steady progress, the rock in tbe bottom working 
well. It is now down 1,066 ft. But little headway has 
been made in the main north drift on the I,167-ft. level 
from the Gould & Curry shaft during the week, owing 
to the striking ol a heavy flow of water in the face of 
the drift of so hot a temperature as to make it almost 
impossible for the men to prosecute the work. 

Lower Comstook.— Gold Hill News, June 28: Work is 
actively resumed to develops the valuable claim of the 
Co. situated on the lower portion of the branch of the 
great lode leading down Gold Canon. The claim lies 
on the west side of the canoD, within the limits of Sil- 
ver City, and opposite the t >wn. It iB finely secured by 
United States patent, and various tunnels, run Into it in 
times past from the ravine, have pretty well defined the 
position and value of the main ore vein, which is from 
70 to 100 ft. wide. The quartz is of a fine character, 
and gives good assays. The old prospecting shaft of 
the Co. is 125 ft. in depth, and cut into quartz very 
much resembling the rich Ophir of years ago. There is 
every evidence to induce the belief that a rich, extenBive 
and valuable mine will be developed when adequate 
depth is attained. With this view the Co. commenced 
last Saturday the sinking of a large working-shaft of 
three compartments, which, it is calculated, will cut 
the ledge at the depth of 800 ft. The first level will 
be opened at 400 ft. for a drift west of the ledge. Pay 
ore should, and probably will be found at that depth. 
The Bhaft is already 30 ft. deep, and the contract for the 
first 100 ft. is let to R. A.Young, of Silver City. 

Cbown Point Extension. — This mine, adjoining the 
Grown Point and Belcher to the southward on the 
branch of the great lode leading down Gold Canon, is 
now about to be practically opened and developed. The 



title is finally secured by TJ. S. patent, and all things in 
that line being completed^ the Co., on Monday last com- 
menced sinking a large working shaft of three compart, 
ments. Mr. R. A. Young, of Silver City, has the con- 
tract for sinking the first 100 ft. It is already down 
about 20 ft., making very good progress, bteam for 
hoisting works will be erected, with the intention of 
sinking to the depth of at least 1,000 ft., at which point 
it is expected to intersect the ledge. The new prospect- 
ing shaft of the Front Lode Mining Company being 
sunk a few hundred yards further down the canon, on 
the same lead, is £0 ft. deep, and already shows very fa- 
vorable looking vein matter. 

American Flat. — Sinking the incline is making good 
progress, with the bottom in quartz and porphyry. The 
Co. having contracted with the Baltimore Consolidated 
for the privilege of running a drift from the main west 
tunnel on the 450-ft. level of that mine, so as to cut the 
ledge and prospect their mine at a much less expense 
and are making good progress with the same. 

Fbanlktn.— The clearing out and repairing of the 
main drift iB still being vigorously driven ahead. Two 
shifts of men are employed, and they progress at the 
rate of two sets of timbers in three days. New ground 
and the ledge itself will be reached in the course of a 
week or ten days. Detached pieces of loose ore are 
frequently met with in the progress of the work, which 
give good assays. One piece last Wednesday assayed 
$124 26 to the ton, 25 per cent, of which was gold. 

Imperial. — There iB no particular change to note in 
the appearance or prospects of the mine. Work goes 
on as usual, and everything operates well. 

Gould & Cobry. — The new pumps were all completed 
in good running order, and started up at six o'clock last 
evening. The main northeast prospecting drift on the 
1,500-ft. level is still driven ahead, the face in quartz 
and porphyry. The connection of the south drift on 
the 1,600-ft. level with the Savage gives thorough ven- 
tilation, and affords the opportunity to cross-cut and 
develop that portion of the mine. 

Woodvuxe. — This mine continues to yield well, 
keeping the mill steadily running. The Buit brought 
against the Woodville by the Justice Co. is drawing to- 
ward a close. It is .not a suit for title, as many have 
supposed, but merely for trespass, the Justice alleging 
that the Woodville Co. have been gouging in upon them 
and taking ore from the Justice ground. 

Hale and Noboboss. — Daily yield 50 tons of ore. 
Sinking the north winze, from the 1700<-ft. level down- 
ward, is making good progress. The engine used on 
the 1500-ft. level, to do the hoisting in the winze from 
the 1700 to the 1500-ft. levels, will be used to do the 
hoisting from this new winze. 

Sierra Nevada.— Daily yield, 60 tons of ore. The ore 
breaBts in the upper and middle portions of the mine 
are being gradually extended back further into the 
mountain, and continue to show an improvement in 
both the quantity and quality of the ore extracted. The 
mill is kept Bteadily running on ore from the mine. 

Abizo a and Utah. — Sinking the winze in the main 
east drift on the 250-ft. level is making excellent pro- 
gress, the face from the tunnel level downward contin- 
uing in good ore. Sinking the shaft has again been re- 
sumed, the rock in the bottom working well, and no 
water to interfere with the progress of the work. 

Opbxb. — Prospecting at the lower levels still vigor- 
ously going on, but no favorable indications of large ore 
bodies are met with just at present. A great deal of 
work has been and still is doing in this mine, and to the 
depth of 1,500 ft. An assessment of $5 per share, 
amounting to $48,000 was levied last Monday. 

Mint.— The main drift of the upper working is still 
being actively driven ahead, making good progress, fol- 
lowing the wall of the ledge. A crosscut will be made 
into it shortly .when good results are anticipated. Work 
at the lower level will be resumed as Boon as practi- 
cable. 

Occidental. — The ore-body in the main north tunnel 
is developing finely, being now from 15 to 18 ft. in 
width, and of excellent quality. This mill will be 
started up on ore from the mine in a few days, when 
some good returns may be looked for, 

Julia. — The south drift from the main west tunnel, 
on the 1,000-ft. level is making fair progresB, the face 
sho wing some good ore. Work has again been resumed 
in the main east drift on the SOO-ft. level. This drift is 
now in a distance of 550 ft. 

Justice.— The old south mine continues to yield 
about 20 tons per day. Drifting south at the 800-ft. level 
going on as usual, with favorable indications. An as- 
sessment of $1 per share, amounting to $21,000 was 
levied last Tuesday. 

Caledonia. — The 400-ft. level still continues to yield 
50 to 60 tonB of good miling ore per day, keeping the 
Sapphire mill steadily running. The main west drift at 
the 500-foot level is making good progress. 

Utah. — Draining the water from the shaft is ma king 
excellent progress, it being reduced to within 20 ' feet of 
the bottom. As Boon as the water is drained, sinking 
the main shaft will be resumed. 

Overman. — 'West drifts Btill going ahead, with no ma- 
terial change to report. 

Yellow Jacket. -Drifting north and south at both 
the 1,500 and 1, 400-ft. levels. Only this and nothing 
more. No new developments. 



Utah. 



Salt Lake Journal, June 19: News from the new 
mining camp in the vicinity of Terrace is more flatter- 
ing than ever. A fourth part of one of the prospects 
was sold for $4,000 cash. The district can be traced for 
over 5 miles, and a party of prospectors, who have Just 
returned from a place 7 miles further on, have brought 
in ore of very high grade. A number of gentlemen of 
this city, who have visited the place, have "gone wild" 
over the prospect. Parties are now fitting out a stage 
line to connect the camp with the railroad. The indi- 
cations for a flourishing, new district are good. High- 
grade, free milling ore, found within 10 miles of a 
railroad, in apparently inexhauBlible quantities, cannot 
but excite the attention of miners. 

Salt Lake Tribune, Jue 21: The principal mines now 
being worked in the district are the Del Monte, Silver 
World, Crown Point, Irvin, Terrace, Queen of the West, 
Silver Shield, May Flower, Forest Queen, Homestead, 
Midsummer, Silver Mountain, Central Pacific, Argents, 
and the Nellie Grant. The general character of the 
ore iB represented to be high-grade galena, with copper, 
selected samples averaging $300 in Bilver, 60 per cent, in 
lead, 10 per cent, in copper, and $27 in gold to the ton. 
All the above-named mines are more or leBS developed. 
But the Mayflower and Del Monte are prominent in that 
respect. The former has a shaft down 60 feet, which iB 
intended to tap the ledge at an incline of 100 ft. The 
Del Monte has an incline down 60 feet, and ore is being 
taken out all the way down. A sample of ore from the 
bottom of thiB incline assayed about $800 silver to the 
ton. 

Rosebud Mines. — Salt Lake Journal, June 23: A pri- 
vate letter received to-day by Messrs. A. S. Gould & Son, 
dated Rosebud, June 22, contains the following: 

We have just got a prospect about five miles from 
here that will prove the best yet. An Indian came into 
camp with Borne rock and offerred to show us the ledge 
for two horses; as we had no horses to give him, we 
gave him thirty dollars and a pair of blankets. He 
took us to the ledge five mileB from here, it 1b about 
twelve feet wide, and looks first rate. We had one assay 
from the surface, it went $165.40 per ton. I was up 
there yesterday, and organized a new district, called 
Shoshone district. 

The Windsor Mines.— This Bplendld group in Little 
Cottonwood, consisting of the Hiawatha, Montezuma, 
Last Chance and Savage, is looking magnificently. 
Steady work has been going on in them during the win- 
ter, and large bodies of ore have been developed, The 
dump is well filled, and with the facilities now enjoyed 
by the completion of the tunnel no doubt the mineB 
will be placed upon a dividend paying basis within 30 
days after the roads will permit the shipment of ore. 



New Incorporations 

The following companies have filed certlflcatees of in- 
corporation in the County Clerk's office, S. F. 

Black Mountain Coal M. Co. — June 27. Location, 
State of California. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Trustees 
— Isham Case, William Strader, O. B. Burroughs, M. 
Bankhead and George H. Smith. 

Clifton Coal M. Co. was also incorporated, having 
the same amount of capital stock, objects and trustees. 
Amadob Canal and Mining Co —June 30. Object- 
To construct and maintain canals and ditches in Ama : 
doT, Calaveras and other counties, for floating wood and 
lumber and to supply water for mining and agricul- 
tural purposes. Capital stock, $500,000. Directors — 
Abner Doble, Frank M. Brown, Joseph S. Emery, R. 
Thompson and G. M. Condle. 

Rocky Point G. M. Co.— June 30. Location: Sierra 
county. Capital stock,$4,000,000. Directors— F. Jacob 
Wissing, J. B. White, Geo. Loomis, Wm. Pickett and 
Joseph Atwell. 

Wm. Shakespeare G.M. Co. — July^l. Location: Far- 
leestown Mining Dist., Butte Co. Capital, $1,500,000. 
Trustees— R. A.Hawkins.J. S. Allen and Wm. M. Rider. 
Pioneer Flumino Co. — July 1. Location: Shirt-Tail 
Canon, Placer Co., Cal. Capital, $2,400,000. Trustees— 
J. M. Taylor, Maurice Dore, I. J. Corrigan, Arthur K. 
Hawkins and T. B. Kent. 

The Benjamin G. & S. M. Co. has filed a certificate of 
the increase of its capital stock to $3,000,000 from 
$2,000,000. 



CONTINENTAL LlPE INSURANCE Co., No. 302 

Montgomery street, corner of Pine. 

Jesse A. Pdzrce is not our agent at present. 



Milling and Other Comrjanies. 



Owing to the time necessary to mail the present large edition of the 
M. <J- <S. Press, tee are obliged to go to press on Thursday even- 
ing— which is the very latest hour vie can receive advertisements. 



Angels Quartz Mining Company— Princi- 
pal place of business, 408 California street, San 
Francisco. Location of works: Angels Mining Dis- 
trict, Calaveras County, California. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 35), 
levied March 4th, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders aB follows: 

TDMathewson 3 300 $450 Oo 

TDMathewBOn 4 314 47100 

TDMathewson 5 500 750 00 

TDMathewson 17 26 39 00 

T D MathewBon (not issued) 325 5-7 488 57 

J H Fish (not issued) 342 6-7 574 29 

J H Fish, Trustee 20 50 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 21 50 75 00 

J H Fiah, Trustee 22 50 . 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 23 60 75 00 

MrsEBFish 9 1000 1500 00 

RM Anthony 18 100 150 00 

II M Anthony. . . (not Issued) 45 5-7 68 57 

KM Anthony 19 60 90 00 

EH Sawyer 11 800 1200 00 

E H Sawyer . . .-. (not issued) 228 4-7 342 86 

Geo. Osgood ." 12 400 600 00 

Geo. Osgood (not issued) 114 2-7 171 43 

And in accordance with law and an order made by 
the Board of Directors, on the 4th day of March, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be 
necessary , will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
Maurice Dore & Co., 327 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., on Monday, April 21st, 1873, at 2 o'clock 
p. m., of such day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. GEOKGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 1,408 California Street, San Fran 
cIbco, California (up stairs). a5-3t 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company 
The above sale is hereby postponed for thirty days, at 
the same hour and place. 

apl9 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale ifl hereby postponed until Wednesday. 
June 18, 1873, at the same hour and place. 

ml7 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angela Quartz. Mining Company. 
The above sale la hereby postponed until Weduesday, July 
16, 1873, at the same hour and place. 

JH GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 



Alpine Gold Mill and Mining Company- 
Location of principal place of business, San Fran' 
cisco, California. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assesBment levied on the 
13th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows : 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount, 

Felton, CN 25 100 $100 00 

Ives, G J 80 50 50 00 

Luther, T M 26 100 100 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. . . 1 500 600 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee... 2 500 600 00 

Richardson, EA, Trustee... 3 . 600 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee... 4 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee... 5 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee... 6 600 500 00 

RichardBon, E A, TruBtee... 7 600 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . . 9 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .10 600 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee ..12 500 600 00 

Richardson. E A, Trustee . .13 600 500 00 

RichardBon, E A, Trustee.. 14 600 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee ..16 600 60U 00 

RichardBon, E A, Trustee . . 16 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .17 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .20 500 500 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .34 50 60 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . . 38 100 100 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .39 100 100 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . . 45 250 260 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .46 250 250 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee . .47 200 200 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 13th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock aB may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Company, No. 438 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on the 9th day of July, 1873, at the hour of 
1 o'clock P. M. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessments thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER, Secretary. 
Office, No. 438 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Globe Mining Company — Location of 

works, Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Direotors, held on the . d day of July, 1873, an assessment 
(No. 3) of seventy-five cents per share wad levied npon the 
capital stock of the Corporation, payable immediately, in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the tffice of 
the Company, Room No. 26 Hayward's Buiding, No. 419 
California street, San Francisco, Cal. Any stock upon 
■which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 4th day 
of Angust, 1873, will be delinquent and advertised for eale 
at public auction, and, unless payment is made before, will 
be sold on the 25th day of August, 1873, to pay the delin- 
quent asse-emem, together wi;h oosts of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Direotors. 

JOSEPH MaGUIRE. Secretary. 

Office, Room 26, Hayward's Building, No. 419 California 
street, San Francisco, Oa], Jy5 



Bunker Hill Quartz Mining Company— Lo- 

cation of workB, Amador, Amador County, California. 

Principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 5th day of Jnne, 1873, an assessment 
(No. 10) of Ten Dollars net share was leviea upon the capi- 
tal stock of the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at his office, No. 19 First 
street, San Fran iaco, California. Any stock upon which 
this assessment shall remain unpaid on Monday, the 7th 
day of July, 1873. will be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unlesa payment is made before, will 
he sold on Monday, the 28th day of July, 1673. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
ana expenses of sale. By order of the Directors. 

]14 OHARLS H. KNOX, Secretary pro tem. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— At a meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Bunker Hill Quartz Alining Company, held 
this day, the assessment (No. 9) levied December ad, 1872, 
tor Ten Dollars per share, was rescinded. Any stock upon 
which said assessment has been paid will be credited with 
the amount paid, upon AsseBsmentNo. 10, 

CHARLES H. KNOX, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 5, 1373. 



Central Land Company— Office and Prin- 

clpal place of business, 338 Montgomery street, Room 5, 

San Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Direct- 
ors, held on the ninth day of June, 1873, an assessment of 
one dollar and twenty-five cents per share was levied upon 
the capital stock of the Corporation, payable Immediaie'y, 
to the Secretary ,at the office of the Company, 338 Mont- 
gomery Btreet, Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. Any stock 
upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 10th 
day of July, 1873, will be delinquent and advertised for Sale 
at public auction, and unless payment Is made before, will 
be sold on the 28th day of July, 1873, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. F. B. HAS WELL, Secretary. 
. Office, 338 Montgomery street. Room 5, San Francisco. 

June 10th, 1873 jllULta 

The California Beet Sugar Co.— Loca- 
tion of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of Works: Alvarado, Alameda 
County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 26th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

W.T.Garratt 2 125 $12 60 

W. T. Garratt 40 63 6 30 

EphraimDyer 6 63 6 80 

Ephraim Dyer 89 62 6 20 

H. G. Rollins 9 63 6 30 

H. G. Rollins 35 25 2 50 

H. G. Rollins 36 12 1 20 

Wm.B.Carr. 23 250 26 00 

Wm.B.Carr 62 88 3 80 

E. H. Dyer 27 5 50 

E.H.Dyer 71 245 24 50 

AustinD. Moore 60 60 6 00 

T.G.Phelps 68 53 5 30 

And in accordance with law and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each pareel of said stock &b may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the company, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on Tuesday the 22d day of July, 1873, at 12 
o'clock noon of said day, to pay said delinquent assess 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

LOUIS FRANCONI, Secretary. 
Office, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Equitable Tunnel and Mining Company, 

Location of works, Little Cottonwood District, Utah Ter- 
ritory. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held ou the fifth day of May, 1873, an assess- 
ment (No. 2) of ten cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 35 New Merchants' Exohange. 
Any slock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the tenth day of June, 1873, will be delinquent and 
advertised for Bale at public auction, and unless payment 
Is made before, will be sold on the thirtieth day of June, 
1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Direc- 
tors. 

CHARLES S. HEALY, Secretary. 
Office, No. 35 New Merchants' Exchange, San Franoisco 
Cat 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deemln* stock delin 
quentonthe above assessment is hereby postponed unti 
Wednesday, July 2d, 1873, and the sale thereof until Tues- 
day, the 22d day ol July, 1873, By order of the Board of 
Directore. CHAS. 8. HEALY, Secretary. 

Dutch Flat Blue Gravel Mining Company. 

Place of business, Son Francisco, Cal. 

Notioe. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 2) levied 
on the 13th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Booth, LA 13 2000 $1000 

Booth, LA 14 1000 6C0 

Booth, LA 16 1000 600 

Cope, GW, Trustee 67 100 60 

Cope, G W, Trustee 68 100 60 

Cope. G W, Trustee 69 100 50 

Cope, GW, Trustee 70 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 37 600 250 

Dorsey, EB 42 200 100 

Dorsey, EB 43 100 60 

Dorsey.EB 44 100 60 

Dorsey.EB 45 100 60 

Dorsey.EB 46 100 60 

Dorsey.EB 47 100 60 

Fry, JD 17 500 250 

Forbes, Alex, Trustee. . . .52 2000 1000 

GaBhwiler, J W 36 800 400 

Heydenfeldt, S 16 2000 1000 

Baggin, JB 6 1000 600 

Haggin.JB 6 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 18 500 260 

Roberts, GD 20 1000 600 

Roberts, G D 21 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 22 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 25 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 26 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 27 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 28 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 29 1000 600 

Raymond, W H 3 1000 600 

Raymond, W H 4 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.32 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.33 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. 34 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.35 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.49 500 250 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.60 200 100 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.51 100 60 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.64 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trnstee.65 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.56 1000 600 

Taylor, H W 60 180 90 

Taylor.HW 61 20 10 

Taylor, HW 64 600 250 

Whitcomb, C A 63 100 50 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the 13th day of May, 1873, bo 
many shareB of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at the office of the company, 
room 11,401 California street, San Francisco, Cal., on 
Monday, the 14th day of July, 1873, at the hour of 12 
o'clock m. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. W. M. HELMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 401 California street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. jn28 



July 5, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



13 



Frear Stone Company of California— 

— Principal place of basineta and t<c*'ion of works. City 
and Coai ly of San Kraiiciico, Slate of 1 'aliform*. 
Notice i> hereby given, that at a meetlof of the Board of 
Diraciora, held od Ihe iTlh d«J of May. IsTl, *n *we**menl 
( No. €) of Two Dollar* per ■hare wnjlcvled upon the capi- 
tal »lock of Ihe Corporation, pajablr liumtdiaUlv, In 
I'mte-i hUtea gold ooln.to (tie Secretary, at ibe offiw of 

• La Omptor. No. 414 California Ureal, San Francisco 
California. Aojr itock upon which tbU aaaeBsmrnt shall 
rrtnalo onpaid on the !Otb day of June, 1873. will be delin- 
.(iien-., and advertised f or aale ai public auction, and 00- 
!•*« t'ajmeni l» made before, will be sold on Monday . the 
!lat ili» of July. ItfTS. tu pay l he delinquent nurumelit, to- 
K«-ther «it!i cu»u oi adTertulnjt and c»pen**e or aale. 

R. WEGENER. Secretary. 
Ofl.ce. 4 I California street. 8u Francisco. Cal. n.29 

Great Blue Gravel Range— Location of 

Works, Placer Coonty, Bute of California. 

Notice la hereby given, that at a nutting of the Board of 
D recora of aaid Coinjiany. held on the I'itti day of Jutu 1 , 
1973. au aeaeeameot (So. 3) of teo (IV) cent* per ab*re wa» 
levied upon the capital atock of ooid Company, payable 
immediate!/. In void coin of the toiled Mateo, to the 
Secretary at nla office, Ko«m ft and O, No. 3oi Montgoni' r\ 

• met. Ban Kranclaco, California. Any et"ck upon which 
•aid aaaeaameat ihali remain unpaid on Monday, the llth 
dav of July, IKS. shall be deemed delinquent, 
and will be duly advertised for aale at pa..- 
II auction, and auleaa payment ahall be made 
before, will be sold 00 Tuesday, the 6th day if Augiwt, 
HO, t*> pay the delinquent ai>&ea*mvnt. together with cost* 
of advertising and eipcoaeaof aale. By order of the Board 
of Directors. WM. II. WATSON. Secretary. 

Office. Room 3 and 6, No. Jfi Montgomery atret-t. San 
I ranolaco. Cal. 14-tlAa 



Hasloe Mill and Mining Company — Prin- 

1 lp*I place of business, No. 408 California street, San 

Franc-loco. Location of works: Mailposa County, 

California. 

Notice. —Then are dt-llna uent upon the following de- 
scribed itock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 14th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the name* of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

O BDleferrarl 3 10 $ 5 00 

WmD Higgle* 74 (0 25 00 

T V Julian 71 10 5 CO 

WmHF Minnie 25 60 25 00 

Margaret Ragsdale 44 50. . I *, M 

Margaret IUgstUle 45 25 Dal J 2I ™ 

CIrvingSmlth 52 10 5 00 

Irving Smith 53 10 5 00 

CH Roberts 67 26 12 50 

CH Roberts 68 26 12 50 

GWWoods 47 20 10 00 

WHThomu.... 10 10 fl 00 

WH Thomas 24 15 7 50 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 14th day of May, 1873, so 
many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company. No. 408 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on Monday, the 21st day of July, 1873, at 
the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., of said day, to pay said de- 
llnquent assessment thereon, together with costsof ad- 
vrrt iniu^And expenses of the sale. 

J. "VY. TRIPP, Secretary. 

Office — 408 Calfornia street, up stairs, Son FranclBco 
California. Jy-6 

Heckerdorn Gold and Silver Mining Com- 

pany--Princlnal place of business, San Francisco, CalU 

lornia. Location of works, Blue Mountain District, Cul- 

nteras County, California. 

Notice la hi-reby civen.Tbut at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 9th day of Jane. 1873, an assessment 
oi twenty-five cents per share waa levied upon the capital 
ftockofthe Corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at hie office, No 734 
\i 'i. io'Iudi y at. San Francisco, California. Any stock up- 
on which this a*Bcs»rotnt shall remain unpaid on the tenth 
day of July, 1673i wi>l bo delinquent^ and advertised for 
■ale a< public auction, and ntiless payment is made before, 
will bo sold on Monday ihe 28th day of July, 1873, to pay 
the delinquent assenHmeut, together wilb coats of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. 

LOUIS TEBME, Secretary. 

Office 734 Montgomery street, room No. 5, Office hour*, 
from 10 to 12 a M .and from I to 3 P M. jlMwddts 



Lady Esten Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of business. No. 35 New Merchants' t±- 

chango, San Francisco, California. Location of works. 

Little Cottonwood District. L'tah Torritofv. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the llth day of June, 1873, an assessment 
( No. 3) o< five cents per share waB levied upon the capital 
m >ck of the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States Rold coin, to the Secretary; No. 35 New Merchant' 
Exchange, San trancieco, Cal. Any stock upon which this 
na.<csgment shall remain Unpaid on the 17(h day of JUly, 
18T(L will be delinquent, and adVeftised ior sale at public 
auction, and unless payinenl in made before, will be wold 
0b v. ednesday, the 6th day of August, 1873, to nay the de- 
linquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. OIIAS. S. HE-ALY, Secretary. 

Office, 35 New Merchants' Exchange! California street, 
San Francisco. California. jU 



Mansfield Gold Mining Company— Lo- 

cation of principal place of business, San Francisco, 

Oallfornla. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
8th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 
tho' names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Austin, H Bal due on assmnt $12 25 

Bruce, D Bal due on assmnt 19 00 

Chester, H Bal due on aBsmnt lu 00 

Dennis, John Not issued 790 87 60 

Fryer, Geo. H ..Bal due on assmnt 7 50 

ttilbert.OA Notissued 2100 105 00 

Holman, 80 Notissued 625 26 25 

Bam, OH 69 1000 60 60 

Ham.OH 70 1000 50 00 

Ham, OH 71 1000 50 00 

Ham.OH 74 250 12 60 

Ham.OH 76 250 12 50 

Ham, CH 76 250 12 60 

Ham.OH 77 260 12 50 

Ham.CH 78 122 6 10 

Ham.OH 268 100 5 00 

Ham.OH 269 100 6 00 

Ham.CH 270 100 5 00 

Ham.CH 271 100 5 00 

Ham.OH 272 100 6 00 

Ham, OH 273 100 5 

Ham.OH .274 100 5 00 

Ham.CH 275 100 6 00 

Ham.OH 276 100 5 00 

Ham.OH 277 100 5 00 

Murphy, Richard Notissued 1623 8115 

Peterson, Andrew 158 100 5 00 

Peterson, Andrew 166 100 5 00 

Steere.JB 228 100 5 00 

SUerc.JB 229 50 2 60 

Street.OO 232 25 126 

9treet;00 233 25 125 

Street.OO 234 25 125 

Street.OO 235 25 126 

Wertheimer.K 221 100 5 00 

Woods, A Bal of aBmnt 12 60 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 8th day of May 
1873, so many share? of each parcel of said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the ofiicr 
of the Company, Room 14, No. 331 Kearny street, San 
Francisco, California, on the 8th day of July, 1873, at 
the hour of one (1) o'clock p, m. of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

WM. SMALL, Secretary. 
Office, Boom 14, No. 331 Kearny street, San Francisco 
California. jn21 



Manhattan Marble Company of Califor- 
nia— Pnni-iual place oi bu.in*sa, San Kraaciaco. Loca- 
lity of work.. Oakl.nd, OaL 

Noiita I. li.rnl.) j. .en. that at a ineetina of the Board 
of Director., h- Id on tbe H-l day of June. 1073, an 1111011, 
meat ot one dollar per .bare w»* levied upon the capital 
•took or the corporation, pa* able immediately In United 
State, cold coin, to tbe Secretary. 11 tbe office ot the Com- 
pany, ily I'm,- etrei't. S»t. Kruc 

Anv etock lllioli which tin. .Moment ahall remain un- 
[Hid otitlie2lth day ot July. 1B7J. will be delinquent, and 
advertlacd (or eale ai public anctlun, and unleu payment 
I. made before, will be .old on Monday, 111. llth day of 
Au.-u.t. 1-7J to i»> tin- delinquent aa>ei.metit. together 
with costs hi advertising and eilienee. of .ale. 

D. X. BOKEi:, -ecretary. 
Ollic. , 319 Pine St.. B. P., Cal. 



Newton Booth Consolidated Mining Com- 
pany.— Location of principal place ot business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Ely Min- 
ing District, Lincoln county, Nevada. 
Nttnck.— There are delinquent upon the following 
fllenTinnrl stock, on account of assessment levied on 
t be seventh day of May,1873, the several amounta set op- 
posite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 
Names, No. Certificate. No. Shares, Amount. 

T Campbell, Trustee 14 100 $50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 15 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 16 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 17 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 18 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 19 100 60 00 

T t.'ampbell, Trustee 20 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 21 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 22 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 23 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 24 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 26 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 26 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee- 84 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trusee 36 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 37 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 38 100 50 00 

T Campbell, TruBteo 39 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 40 100 60 00 

JTBabcox 41 50 25 00 

JTBabcox 42 25 12 60 

JTBabcox 43 26 12 50 

T Campbell 46 60 25 00 

T Campbell 46 60 25 00 

T Campbell 47 00 25 00 

TCampbell 48 50 28 00 

TCampbell 49 60 25 00 

TCampbell 50 50 25 00 

TCampbell 61 60 25 00 

TCampbell ..62 60 26 00 

TCampbell 68 60 25 00 

TCampbell 67 26 12 50 

TCampbell 68 26 12 50 

TCampbell 69 50 25 00 

TCampbell 60 100 50 00 

TCampbell 61 100 50 00 

•TCampbell 62 100 50 00 

TCampbell 63 100 50 00 

TOampbell 64 100 50 00 

TCampbell 65 100 60 00 

TCampbell , 66 100 60 00 

TCampbell 67 100 50 00 

TCampbell 68 100 60 00 

TCampbell 69 100 60 00 

TCampbell 70 100 60 00 

TOampbell 71 100 60 00 

TCampbell. 72 100 60 00 

TCampbell 73 100 50 00 

TCampbell 74 100 60 00 

TCampbeU 76 100 50 00 

TCampbell 76 100 60 00 

TCampbell 77 100 50 00 

TCampbell 78 100 50 00 

TCampbell 79 50 25 00 

TCampbell 80 50 25 00 

TCampbell.. i...... 81 50 25 00 

TOampbell 82 50 25 00 

TCampbell 88 10 26 00 

TCampbell 84 Jo 35 00 

TCampbell 86 50 25 00 

TCampbell 86 50 26 00 

TCampbell 87 60 25 00 

TCampbell..... 88 5n 25 00 

TCampbell 89 B0 25 00 

TCampbell 90 SO 26 00 

TCampbell 91 60 25 00 

TCampbell........ .92 60 25 00 

TOampbell 98 60 25 00 

TCampbell 94 60 25 00 

TCampbell 95 60 25 00 

TCampbell 96 60 25 00 

TCampbell 97 60 25 00 

TCampbell 98 60 25 00 

TCampbell. 99 100 50 00 

TCampbell .......100 100 50 00 

TCampbell 101 100 60 00 

T|Campbell 102 100 60 00 

TCampbell 103 100 50 00 

TCampbell 104 100 50 00 

TOampbell 105 100 50 00 

TOampbell i 106 100 50 00 

'T Campbell 107 100 50 00 

TCampbell 108 100 50 00 

JQCullen 113 44 22 00 

OHLugrange 114 434 217 00 

OTHutchluson 116 434 217 00 

N Hamilton 117 217 108 50 

AHRutherford 119 650 325 00 

OT Hutchinson, Trustee 121 600 260 00 

O T Hutchinson, Trustee 122 5C0 250 00 

OT Hutchinson, Trustee 123 50 25 00 

JTBabcox 124 50 25 00 

James L DuBois...... 125 100 60 00 

Mrs TW Scott , 126 100 50 00 

RFrankOlarke 127 50 26 00 

SJRaymond 128 25 12 60 

TWScott 129 50 26 00 

SFElliott.." 131 100 50 00 

WPVose 132 50 25 00 

TCampbell 132 60 30 00 

MWinants 136 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 137 100 60 00 

AHMiller 138 600 300 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 139 200 100 00 

O Miller 140 109 54 60 

Rob't F 8colt, Trustee 141 1500 750 00 

TCampbell 142 144 72 00 

OIHutchlnson 144 500 250 00 

Jaines W Wright 145 100 50 00 

James W Wright 146 100 60 00 

James W Wright 147 100 50 00 

James W Wright 148 100 50 00 

James W Wright 149 100 50 00 

James W Wright 150 100 60 00 

JameB W Wright 151 100 50 00 

James W Wright 152 100 50 00 

JomesWWright 153 100 60 00 

JamesW Wright 154 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 155 100 60 00 

JamesWWright 156 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 157 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 158 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 169 100 60 00 

TCampbell 160 135 67 50 

TOampbell 161 210 105 00 

WHHenderson 164 1000 500 00 

B Herringhi 166 100 50 00 

B Herringhi 167 100 50 00 

B Herringhi 168 100 50 00 

B Herringhi, Trustee 169 350 175 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trnstees.170 600 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 171 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trnstees.172 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees.173 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co , Tmstees.174 100 60 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees.176 100 50 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees.176 100 50 00 



Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

B V Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 177 100 60 00 

B K Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 178 2O0 100 00 

B F Sherwood at Co,,Trustoe*.179 100 60 00 

B F Sherwood A Co., Trustees. Ihii loo 60 00 

B T Sherwood at Co., Trustees. lsl 78 39 00 

JamesWWright 182 888 19160 

It F Scott, Trustee 183 234 167 00 

B F Scott. Trustee 184 100 60 00 

B F Scott, Trustee 185 100 60 00 

T Campbell. Trustee 186 60 25 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 187 60 25 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 188 60 25 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 189 60 25 00 

BFSIdes 190 100 60 00 

BF Bides 191 100 50 00 

BFSIdes 192 100 50 00 

BKBidos 193 100 60 00 

BFSIdes 10, 100 60 00 

WHHenderson 195 100 50 00 

W H HesdersOD 196 100 60 00 

WHHenderson 197 100 60 00 

WHHenderson 198 100 60 00 

WHHenderson 199 100 50 00 

BFSIdes 200 831 415 60 

WHHenderson 201 1287 643 60 

TCampbell 208 193 96 00 

O Smith, Trustee 204 100 60 00 

Myron Angel 208 100 60 00 

WKLauib 207 60 25 00 

BFSIdes 209 6618 2,809 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of tho 
Board of Directors, made on tho 7th day of May, 1878, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock aa may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the oflice 
of the Company, No. 314 California street, San Francis- 
co, California, on tho 12th day of July, 1873, at the hour 
of 1 o'clock, p, m., of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. LOUIS FRANCONI, Secretary. 

Office, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. junl4 



Omega Table Mountain Mining Company. 

Location of work*., Taolnmne Connty, California. 

Notice ia hereby lmvuii. that ut a meeting of the Board of 
Director?*, held no the 4th diy of June. I&73. un assessment 
(No, 2) if Five Cents perse are was levied npon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United 
Slates uold anil silver coin, to the Secretary, at No. 28 Mer- 
chants Exchange, ^an Francisco, Oullfurnia. Any stock 
upon which ihis asaensment shall remain unpaid on tho Sth 
day of July, 1373, will be delinquent and advcriitted for sale 



at public auction, and nnless payment is made before, will 
be sold on the 28th day or Jaly, 1873, to pay the dellnquen' 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 



penses uf nale. By order of the Director 

DAVID WILDER. Secretary. 
Office, No. 29 Merchants' Exchange, California street. 
Ban Francisco, California. j5-4w 



Orient Silver Mining Company- Location 

of prlnclpnl place of business, San Francisco, California. 

Location of workB, Ely Mining District, Lincoln County, 

Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Direct- 
ors, held on the 1-lth day of June, 1873, an assessment (No. 
2) of Ten Cents per share was levied upon tho capital stock 
of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United States 
gold coin, to the Secretary, at the oJllco of the Company, 
Room No. 26, Hay ward's Building, No. -II ft California street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the '9tn day of July, 1873, will be delinquent, and 
advertised for -nl<- at public auction, and unless payment 
Is made before, will be sold on Monday, the llth day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with cost? of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH MAGUIRE, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 26, Hayward'a Building, No. 419 0.4.- 
fornla street, Man Francicco, California. j!6 



Regent Consolidated Mining Company— 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of -works, Little Cottonwood 
District, Salt Lake County, Utah Territory. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed Stoch, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied on 
the 26th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows : 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Allen, James M. 46 10 Jl 00 

Allen, JamesM 48 10 100 

Allen, JamesM 50 10 100 

Allen, JamesM 61 10 100 

Allen.JamesM 83 10 100 

Allen, Jaines M 54 10 100 

Allen, JameB M 55 26 2 60 

Allen, JameflM 56 25 2 50 

Allen.JamesM 67 ,25 2 60 

Allen.JamesM 58 25 2 50 

Allen, James M 69 80 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 60 60 6 00 

Allen.JamesM 61 fiO 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 62 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 65 50 6 00 

Allen.JamesM 67 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 68 50 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 69 1000 100 00 

Allen, JameBM 73 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM.... 74 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 75 100 10 00 

Allen, JameBM 77 50 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 170 260 26 00 

Allen.JamesM 172 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 182 250 25 00 

Allen, JanieB M 183 260 25 00 

Allen.JamesM 185 260 25 00 

Allen.JamesM 187 260 25 00 

Allen.JamesM 190 250 25 00 

Allen.JamesM 212 10 100 

Allen.JamesM 213 10 100 

Allen, JameBM 214 10 100 

Allen.JamesM 216 10 100 

Allen, James M 217 10 1 00 

Allen.JamesM 219 10 100 

Allen.JamesM 220 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 222 100 10 oO 

Allen, JameB M 223 100 10 00 

Allen.JamesM 224 100 10 00 

Allen, JameB M 225 100 10 00 

Allen.JamesM 226 100 10 00 

Allen.JamesM 227 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 229 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 230 100 10 00 

Allen.JamesM 235 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 236 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 237 20 2 00 

Allen, JameBM ...238 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 239 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 240 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 241 20 2 00 

AUen, James M 242 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 243 20 2 00 

Allen. JameB M 244 20 2 00 

Allen, JameBM 245 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 246 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 247 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 248 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 250 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 251 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 252 50 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 263 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 254 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 255 60 6 00 

Allen.JamesM 256 60 5 00 

AUen, JamesM 257 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 258 60 5 00 

Allen, JameBM 259 50 5 00 

Allen, JameB M 260 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM .261 60 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 262 60 5 00 

Bessie, MD 264 50 6 00 

Chase, Dudley 322 250 25 00 



Names. No. Certificate. No. Share i. Amount. 

Fortune.HW 327 160 16 00 

Gate*. Mrs L 265 60 6 00 

Gates, George 266 25 2 60 

Gates, George 267 25 a 60 

Gates, George 268 25 2 60 

Gates, George 269 « 2 50 

Gates, George 270 25 2 60 

Gate*, George 271 26 2 60 

Him. kley, George E 164 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 155 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 166 60 6 00 

Hinckley. George E 167 50 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 1(,6 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 167 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 321 100 10 00 

Hinckley, George E 323 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 324 60 6 00 

Hinckley, Qeotge F. 325 60 6 00 

Higg.ns.WW 162 60 8 00 

HlgginB.WW 272 35 a ft) 

HigginB.WW 273 25 2 50 

HlgginB.WW 274 25 3 60 

Higgins.WW 275 25 2 60 

Higglns.WW 276 60 5 00 

HigginB.WW 277 60 6 00 

Higgins.WW 278 50 5 00 

Higgins.WW 379 60 5 00 

Higgins.WW .282 60 6 00 

Higgins.WW 283 50 5 00 

High.WH 828 100 10 00 

Shannon, Luke 307 50 6 00 

Shannon, Mrs C A 308 40 4 00 

Thompson, R M 306 lo 1 00 

Verdon, T J, Trustee 127 60 6 0O 

Verdon, T J.TniBteo 128 60 6 00 

Verdon, T J, Trustee 129 51 5 OO 

Verdon, T J, Trustee 130 60 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 310 60 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 311 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, TruBteu 314 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 310 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 3U 50 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 320 50 6 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
bo many shares of each parcel of such stock as maybe 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office 
of the Company, No. 438 California street, San Francis- 
co, Cal., on Tuesday, the 22d day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock, m., of Bald day, to pay delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

WM. L. TJBTICK. Secretary. 

Office, 438 California street, San FranciBco, California. 
jy5 



Phenix Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of business, No. 36 New Merchants' 
Exchange, S«n Francisco, California. Location of 
works, Alta City, Little Cottonwood District, Utah Terri- 
tory. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetine of tbe Board of 
Directors, held on the 2d day of Julv, 1873, an assessment 
often cents per share was levied upon ihe capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately in United States 
gold an'' silver coin, to the Secretary, No. 85 New Mer- 
chants' Exchange. San FranciBco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the tiih day of August, 1873, will bedelinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unle-s payment 
Is made before, will be Bold on Monday, the 2&th day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with cosls ol advertising and expenses of sale. 

CH*S. S. HEALV, Secretary. 
Office, No. 35 New Merchants' Exchange. jys-dAa 



Stanislaus Water Company of California — 

Principal pl'ice of business, 5'.'6 Kearnv street, San Fran- 
cisco. Location of works, near La Grange, Stain-inn- 
County. 

Notice is hereby given, that at ameotingof the Board oi 
Directors, held on the 2d day of July, 18.3. an assessment 
(No. 2) of two cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, 526 Kearny st. Any stock 
upon which this assessment shull remain unpaid on the 10th 
day of August, 1B73, will be delinquent, and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment is made before, 
will be sold on Tuesday, the 2fith day of August, 1873, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

CLINTON 0. TRIPP, Secretary. 
Office, No . 526 Kearny street. Kooms 1 and 2, San Fran- 
isco. Cal. jy5 



State of Maine Mill and Mining Company 

—Principal places of business, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Location of works: Amador Courty, California. 
Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described Btock, on account of assessmentfNo. 3) levied 
on the 23d day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amounts. 

Jas M Allen, Trustee, 77 200 $10 00 

Jas M Allen, Trustee 78 100 5 00 

JhbM Allen, Trustee, 79 100 5 00 

JMBuffington 20 1000 50 00 

JMBufflngton 6 600 30 00 

J M Buffington 85 66 3 30 

JM Buffington, Trustee,... 84 960 13 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 41 1000 60 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 49 - 20 100 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 50 20 1 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 51 20 100 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 66 50 2 50 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 57 50 2 50 

Chas Borthwlck 72 50 2 50 

H BCongdon 35 20 1 00 

H B Congdon, TruBtee 36 100 5 00 

H B Congdon 37 100 5 00 

H BCongdon, Trustee 38 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 39 100 6 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee 40 500 25 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 73 50 2 50 

H B Congdon, Trustee 74 60 2 50 

H B Congdon, Trustees 75 60 2 60 

OPDudley 76 500 25 00 

John Fay 2 1000 60 00 

John Fay 14 3000 150 00 

WmFaulkner 22 600 25 00 

Mrs M Q Faulkner 10 100 6 00 

Mrs M G Faulkner 11 100 5 00 

V H Higgins 4 1000 50 00 

JasLKlng 83 400 20 00 

8 LMarks 12 240 12 00 

S L Marks 21 500 26 00 

AC Morse, Trustee 42 500 26 00 

A C Morse, Trustee, 41 500 25 00 

A C Morse, Trustee 44 100 5 00 

A C Morse, Trustee 45 100 6 00 

A C Morse, Trustee, 46 100 5 00 

A C Morse, Trustee 48 100 5 00 

Mrs. F. E. Morse 80 100 6 00 

H.H.Beach 3 1000 60 00 

H H Beach 18 1000 60 00 

Mrs. Ella Beach 23 400 20 00 

Chas.B.Tilley 1 1634 8170 

W J. Tilley 61 1000 60 00 

L.N. Tower 28 100 5 00 

J.H.Whitman 5 1000 50 00 

J. H.Whitman 15 2600 130 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23d day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Secretary, 306 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California, on the 21st day of July, 1873, at the hour of 
12 o'clock M ., of said day. to pay the said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. H. B. CONGDON, Sec. 

Office, 306 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

(For Other Mining" Advt's See 16th Page. J 



14 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5> i g 73. 



Machine Builders. 



ESTABUSHED 1851. 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

First and Fremont streets, 

SAN FBAN0IS0O 

IRA P. RANKIN, A.P.BBATTOS, 

GEO. W. FOGG, Snperlnteadent. 

.itea in Engines and Boilers, 

MAIUNE AND STATIONARY, 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS 
Mining Machinery of Erery Description, 

And all other classes of work generally done at flrai- 
olasfl establisnments, manufactured by us at the lowest 
prices, and of the best quality, 

agr Particular attention paid to Jobbing Work and 
Repairs. 

N. B —Sole Agents for sale of HUNTOON'S OELE- 
ERATED PATENT GOVEBNOB. 

18v20-3m SODDAKD 4 00. 



PULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

HUnmOTOHBBB or 

TBAM ENGINES, 
QaartZi Flour and. ©aw Mills, 

aye*' Improved Steam Fnmpi Brodle'a Im- 
proved Crusher, SElnlng Pompi. 
AmolK amators, and all kind* 
of Machinery. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How* 
street, San Francisco. S-qy 



THE RISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Worfr*. 



INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 1868. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000. 



LOCATION OF WOEKB : 

Corner of Beale and Howard Streets. 

BAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Flour 
Mill Machinery, Steam Boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stationary) , Marine Engines (High, and Low Pres- 
sure) . All binds of light and heavy Castings at lowest 
prices. Cams and Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 

Directors i 

Joseph Moore, 0. 3. Brenham, 0. E. MoLaas, 

Wm. NoxriB, Wm. H. Taylor, Lloyd Tevls, 

James D. Walker. 

WM. H. TAYLOR - ....President 

JOSEPH MOORE. . Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS R. MEAD Secretary 

2ivl7-ar 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 
ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

H ri^AM ENGINE8,BOILERe, 



Dunbar 1 e Patent Self- Adjusting- Steam. Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders. 

And all Blinds of mining; Machinery. 

Front Street* between N and O streets, 

Sacbamento Oitt. 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AHD — 

Every "Variety of *Ii acting:, 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 

Steamboat Shafts, Orankit Piston and Con* 

nectlng Kodi, Oar and Locomotive Axles 

and Frames 

-r-iAse"— 
HAMMSBKD IBON 

Of every description and size. 

a»- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY, P. O. box 2032, San Francisco, Oal., will re- 
ocive prompt attention. 

o®- The highest prioe paid for Scrap Iron. 



Miners' Foundry and Machine Works, 

GO-OPERATIVE, 

first Street, bet. Howard and FolBom, San Fsanomot 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds. 



HYDRAULIC CHIEF. 
FISHER'S ^— -jaaacsss^ MACHINES 



KNUCKLE 

JOINT 

AND 

NOZZLE 

IB THE 

Oheapest and Best 

Hydraulic Machine 

in use. 




Manufactured 

TO 0KDEB, 

to throw from 

One 

to an 

eight-inch 

STUEA 31. 



9vSf° nly reliabl6 ^^ iD thS HydraUUC bUSineBS Wb ° Pr0t6CtB MS ^^ *■ H - FISHEB > N6Tada - 0al " 



HYDRAULIC MINERS TAKE NOTICE- 1 hereby caution Miners and Manufacturers against making, Duy- 
inE selline or using a Hydraulic Machine or Joint known as the Little Oiant, manufactured and sold by B. R. & 
J. Craie and Richard Hoskin, as the same is an infringement upon the invention of the machine known as FISH- 
ER'S HYDRAULIC CHIEF, secured by Letters Patent, No. 110,222, dated Dec. 20, 1870. All parties partic.patmg 
in such infringements will be rigorously prosecuted. Nevada, Jan. 13th. 1 . H. 1 ISMHK, 



THE LIGHTNING MILL. 

THE 

LIGHTNING MILL 

For Pulverizing Quartz, 

" Charleston Rock," and all Native Phosphates, 
Flint, Feldspar, Iron Ore, Manganese, Antimony, 
Carbon, Corundum, Old Crucibles, Barytes, Brim- 
stone, Slate, SoapBtone, Graphite, Glass, Marble, 
Plaster, Anthracite and Bituminous Coals, etc. 

WM. STEWART'S 

Patent Bone Mills and 
Crushers. 

For Grinding Bones, Rock, Quartz, and all hard 
substances; also, Com, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Coffee, 
Spices, etc. 

WALKER BROS~&gCO., Twenty-third and Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Sole Manufacturers of Stewart's 
Celebrated Patent Bone Mills and Crushers, A. W. Straub & Oo.'s Patent Revolution French Burr Mill and A, 
Duval's Patent Centrifugal Pumps. 




MINING 



CAMERON'S 



STEAM PUMPS 



DAVID STODDART, 



114 Beale Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



113 and 115 Mission Street. 



JOS. WAGNER, 




SAN FRANCISCO. 

m 



MANUFACTURES OF 

FRENCH BURR 
MILL-STONES 

— AND — 

Portable Mills. 

— ALSO— 

MILLS 

Especially adapted for 
GRINDING QUARTZ. 
AGENT FOR DUFOUR & CO.'S CELEBRATED 

Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloths. 

BOLTING CLOTHS MADE UP. 

Eureka Smut Machines, Bran DuBters, Mill Irons, Spindles -~ 7= 
Bails, Drivers, Steps, Regulating Screws, Silen,t Feeders, Pul- —~~ 
leys, Proof Staffs, Hoisting Screws, Bails and Pins, Conveyor ' — 
Flights, Plaster and Leather Belting. 

Mill Picks, Mill Picks Dressed, Mill Stones Re- 
paired and .Rebuilt. 

Mill Stones Balanced with Fbllehbaum's Patent Balance, of which I am sole proprietor for California, 
Oregon, and Washington Territory, * 16v26tf-2am 




CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kdids of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Meta 
Casting!, Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails.Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship andSteamboat Bells and 
Qongsoffluperiortone. All kindsof Cocks and Valves Hv 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
J*3- PRICES MODERATE. -£* 
J. H. WEED, V. KINOWELL. 

THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOXJlVr>R,Y, 

129 and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard 
San Francisco. 

H«HT AND HEATT CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured. 24vl6qr 



Purchasers please say advertised in Scientific Press. 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

137 and 139 First street SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEIGER & BOL AND, 

IRON FOXJIVDEBS. 

IRON CASTINGS of all descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepburn Boiling- Pan 
and Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for Burning 
Screenings. 

Notice. — Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior Shoes and Dies. 20v26.3m 



O. W. MOULTHROP & CO., 

T> r a \i S'li t * ni e n . 

Flans, Specifications, and Estimates for 
Machinery of all Kinds - 

We also design machines to meet particular demands 
and secure una assign the natents on the same. 
No. 237 First street, San Francisco. apl9-3m 



GEO. W. PBESOOTT. 



0. W. BCHETDEL. 



W. B. EOKABT 



PRESC0TT, SCHEIDELL & CO., 
MARYSVILLE FOUNDRY. 

Corner of B and Fourth streets, Marysville, Cal. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

S T E A. M ENGINES, 

STATIONARY AND PORTABLE 

SAW AND GRIST MILLS, 

Hydraulic Machinery, 

Quartz Crushing and Amalgamating 
Machinery 

Of every description, constantly on hand. 



Plans and estimates furnished upon application. 
Repairs upon all kinds of Machinery promptly made, 
and at moderate charges. 

Having unrivalled facilities, we are prepared to make 
to order, at short notice, anything required in our line. 

Specimens of our work may be seen in all the mining 
regions on this coast. 



A. HANKE'S 
IRON FOUNDRY, 

CONNER MAIN AND HARRISON STREETS, 
Entrance on Main Street San Francisco. 

Every Description of Ornamental Work, 

Stove and French Range Work, grate and fender work, 

small machines of all descriptions, house 

work, etc., promptly attended to. 

25v25-3m 



Machinery. 



N. Seibert's Eureka Lubricators. 




THE HIGHEST PREMIUM 

Awarded by the Mechanics' Institute Fair, San Fran- 
cisco, and State Fair, Sacramento, 1871. 

TheBe Lubricators are acknowledged by all engineers 
to be superior to any they have ever used; feed con- 
stantly by pressure of condensed water, supplied by 
pipe A, regulated under the oil by valve J, and forced 
out through check valve and pipe B into Ihe steam pipe 
0; it tben becomes greasy Bteam, passes to all the 
valves and cylinder at every stroke of the engine; glass 
tube I indicates amount used per hour. Packing on 
rodn and stems lasts longer, and the rings on the piston 
will not corrode. One pint of oil will last from three 
to six days, according to speed and Bize of engine; T, 
sliding gauge; E, valve to shut off when engine stopps; 
H, F, valves to shut off in caBe of frost; steam does not 
enter the cup ; it is always cool; warranted to give satis- 
faction. Patented February 14, 1871. Manufactured by 
California Brass "Works, 125 First street. S. F. 24v23tf 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY. 




The inventor having perfected and tested the durability 
and capacity of the°e Batteries to his entire satisfaction, is 
now ready to manufacture and guarantee them. Parties 
In want of a Battery cannot find their equal in regard to 
PRICE, WEIGHT, CAPACITY, POWER TO RUN THEM. 

State and County Rights for Sale by 

* G. D. CROCKER, 

17v26-tf 315 California street, San Francisco. 



BUY BARBER'S BIT BRACR. 



-*» 



July 5, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



15 



MeMurgy aud Ores. 

RODGERS, MEYER & CO.. 

COU1IIS8ION MERCHANTS, 

ADVANCES MADE 

••> all klnfU of Ore*, »ad particular ntlrtulo. 

PAID TO 

COVaiOKM K.XTN OF DOOM 
ItIMB 



.. W. VTBO.O. W. L. VTUONr. . 

C. W. STRONC <V OO., 
Motullut*{fionl Workx, 

Ho. 10 Stevejuon Street, Dear First, Sam Fbanoi.oh 

We purchAM, Ores, Bullion, etc. OroD worked' And 
Test, made wltb care. Also, Asast. of Oold, tHlvei, 
Copper, LeAd, Tin And other Metals. 23v2'2tf 

LEOPOLD KUH, 

(Formerly of the U. 8. Branch Mint, 8. F.) 

Asmayer and Nletiillni-sjloa; 
CHEMIST. 

No. 011 CoMmerdul Street, 

(Opposite the U. 8. Branch Mint 

6am Francisco, Oal. 7v21-8ra 

JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF AMD DEALERS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 
Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 
612:And 514 Washington street, SAN FRANCISCO 

We would call the special attention of Assayers 
Chemists, Mining Companies, Milling Companies 
Prospectors, etc., to oar large and well adapted stock o 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

—AND — 

Chemical Apparatus, 

Having been engaged In furnishing these supplies since 
the first discovery of mines on the Paciflo Coast. 

tK7~ Our Oold and Silver Tables, Bhowing the value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and val- 
uable tables for computation of assays in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 

7v25-tf JOHN TAYLOR & 00. 



Important to Miners and Mill Men. 

Silver-Flated Oopper Amalgamating Plates, 
for Saving Gold. 

| Of all sizes and in any quantity, furnished to 
order. Full instructions sent for operating. 
Particular attention given to plating goods for 
Builders, Plumbers, etc. Hotel and Restaurant 
work replated. 

San Fhancibco Gold and Silver Plating Works, 

655 Mission street, San Francisco. 

2v25-Sm E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. 



KNOWLES' PATENT STEAM PUMP. 




It litis no Cranks or Fly- Wheel, and has no dead points where it will stop, consequently it is always ready tr> 
start without nslng a starting-bar, and does not require hand-work to get it past the center. Will always start 
\vh- 1) the steam cylinder is filled with cold water of condensation. 

CENTRAL PACIFIC R. R., OFFICE OF THE GEN'L MASTER MECHANIC, ( 
• SAunAMENTO. Cal„ January H, 1873. i 

A. L. FISH, Esq.. A«eut uf the Kuowles 3 to am Pump, San Francisco— Dear Sir: Iu reply to your Inquiry as to fie 
merit* of the Knowlea Steam Pump, in use upon this road, I will nay that it cives mc great pleasure to report that they 
have perlormcu their work well whenever culled upon. In no luntance liuve thev failed. We have now over 30 of them 
in lino on this road an tire engineo, and pump I nc water for nho|i and station «•• . I consider I lie Knowles Steam Pump the 
beat in use, and prefer It to any other. Yours truly, A. J. STEVENS, General Master Mechanic. 

U. S. NAVY YARD, New YoiiK, June 3, 1871. 
Messbs. KNOWLKS A S'HLEV, st'iand IM Liberty struct, New Vork— Gentlemen: In reply to your note of 3lst, re- 
questing my opinion ot your Steam Pump, etc , as au^eated from niy experience with them In ao'ual service, I have to 
state that I hitvu need yodr pumps, and entertain the mo*t favorable opinion of their great merit and uwefulne.^, and for 
every purpose believe them to be auperior to any others, and have so recommended and adopted them. They have 
given complete 8a tin fact ion in all 00868 that have cmue under my ob nervation. 

Yours very respectfully, WM. W. W. WOOD. 

A. L. FISH, Agent Knowles" Steam Pump— Dear Sir: In answer to your Inquiries, wo stale that the highest award 
for Steam Pumps at the Eighth or last Mech-nien' Fair In Sun Francisco, was a First Premium and Diploma, awarded 
to the Knowles Patent Steam Pump, as published in the tjlllcial Liat September 23d. 1871. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, President Board of Managers. 

W. EI. Williams, Sec'y Board of Managers Eighth Industrial Exhibition, M. I. 

WE BTJJXD AND HAVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND 

Largest Stock of Pumps in the World. 

And for Every Conceivable Purpose. 

THE CELEBRATED BOOMER FRE8t>$, 

For Wine, Cider, Lard, Paper, Wool, Hops, Hides, Tobacco, Bags, etc.— the Most Powerful 

in Use. 



The 



A. L. FISH, Agent, 

IVos. © and, 11 First ©troet, ©an Francisco, Oal. 

P. S. All kinds of new and second-hand Machines on band. 10v26 lambp 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

riiese Machines Stand (J»iri\ .tied. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, thev 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be spared 
to have them constructed in the most perfect manner 
and of the great number now In operation, not one has 
ever required repairs. The constant and increasing de- 
mand for them issufflclent evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed bo as to apply steam directly 
Into the pulp, or with steam bottoms, aB desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows. 

The pan being filled, the motion of the mnller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 
the apperture and between the grinding Burfaces.— 
Thence itiBth^own to the periphery into the quicksilver. 
The curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
pasB6B down, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it 1b constantly passing a regular flow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and Into the quicksilver, until the ore is 
reduced to an Impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated. 

Sellers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Mill-men are invited to examine these pans and setters 
for themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San Francises 



Nevada Metallurgical Works. 

RIOTTE & LUCKHARDT, 

Consulting- Mining" Engineers and Metal- 
lurgists, No. 21 First St., S. F. 

WOXCROTG TFST MADEBT ANT PROCESS 
— TESTDTG OF PROCESSES. 

Plus furnished for the most suitable Process for Ores. 

AwKjiy Injc In all Its Branches. 

Analysis of Ores, Minerals, Waters and all other sub- 
stances. 

■?~ Special attention paid to the mining and metal- 
lurgy of Quicksilver. 26vll-6m 



Second-Hand Engines and Boilers 

For Sale by MoAFEE, SPIERS & 00., 
Boiler Makers, etc, 309 to 315 Howard St. 

10-Hobbe Powee Portable THEESHTNa Engine — Cyl- 
inder 7 inches diameter, 12-inch stroke. Boiler well 
proportioned, has all the mountings, is mounted on 
wheels, in first-rate condition, and will be sold cheap. 
This is the very thing for opening a new or working a 
small mine. Price, $700. 

30-Hobse Power Locomotive or Fire Box Boiler — 
made of the best c. h. No. 1 American iron, 6-16 inch 
thick. Furnace 4 feet long, shell 42 inches diameter, 
contains 46 tubes 8xl'J inches, with grate bars, breech- 
ing and smoke stack, all in good condition. Price, $750. 

Three 35.Hob.se Power Boilers, each 50 inches di- 
ameter, 16 feet long, containlug 42 tubes 3H inches 
diameter. Thepe boilers have been entirely rebuilt, and 
are in thoroughly good condition. Will be sold to- 
gether, or separately, ot a low price. 

15-HoitSE Power Boiler— 32 inches diameter, 12 feet 
long, containing 32 tubes 1% inches diameter, with 
steam drum, furnace front, grates and all fittings. 
Price, $300. 

30-Horbe Power Boiler— 48 inches diameter, 16 feet 
long, containing 34 tubes 4 inches diameter, with fur- 
nace front, grate bars, breeching, stack nnd all mount- 
ings complete, and in good condition. Will bo sold 
very cheap. 

25-HonsE Power Horizontal Steam Engine— Cylin- 
der 10 inches diameter, 20-inch stroke, with heater, 
pump, governor, etc., complete, Will be sold very low. 

Build all kinds of BoilerB, Water Pipe, Pump Column, 
Backet.*, Tanks, etc. > jU-lni . 

THEODORE KAXLENBEBGr, 

MACHINIST, 

and Maker of Models for Inventors. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all kinds of 

Small Gears Out. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and In the 

best manner. No. 32 Fremont street, S. F. 19v23-3m 

Richardson & Co.. Copper Ore Wharves, 

© W A.N8EA. 
Richardson & Co. have been for thiny years entablinhed 
in Swansea as A Rents lor the preparation Sampling, Assay- 
ing, and sale of Copper, Silver, Gold, Lead, Zinc, and all 
other Ores and Metals, for which thev have extensive Ware- 
houses and Whnrves under cover, l;04XLi eet of Quay Front- 
ace within the Floating Dock, and the most complete Ma- 
chinery and Appliances. They are al«o pi eiiareu to make 
advances against Ores in anticipation of realization, and to 
guarantee all payments when required. 26v2G ly 



PLATINUM 

Vessels, Apparatus, Sheet, Wire, Etc., Etc. 

For all Laboratory and Manufacturing Purposes 
H. M RATNOR, 
25 Bond street, New York. 
VI* tin urn Scrap and Ore purchased. ! 



NICKEL PLATING. 

The San Francisco Nickel Plating- Company 
Are prepared to plate articles of all descriptions, of any 
metal. Cutlery, Liquor Flasks, Pistols, Guns,Swords,Bri- 
dle Bitts, Pole Crabs.Hub Bands, Dash Rails, and all arti- 
cles of household hardware plated at short notice, and 
warranted. Nickel Plate never tarnishes or corrodes, 
always retaining its pnlish until the article is worn out. 
Office at the KIMBALL MANUFACTORY WORKS, Cor. 
Fourth and Bryant Streets. 12v26-3m 



PACIFIC LAMPJVIANUFACTORY. 

EMILE~BCESCH, 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

LAMPS, LANTERNS AND REFLECTORS. 

802 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




< J^o a a ;* 

Jfgfi.sES 

2-'„ 3 2 



TV eve Mining- *Sc< Mill Lights, 



MANUFACTORY, 

N. E. corner Montgomery and Jackson sts.. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

2lv5-eow-3m 



The Most Complete Invention for Opening 
Cans ever Invented. 

No family that uses canned Fruits, Vegetables, Sar- 
dines or OyBters, should be without one of these con- 
venient household tools. No Re Btaurant, Hotel or 
Oyster Saloon can afford to do withont one. It will 
cut any shaped hole, from a triangle to a perfect circle, 
One sample sent postage free for 75 cents. 

WTESTER & CO., 
17 New Montgomery st. (under Grand Hotel) , 8. F. 



C. W. White, 
47 Clay Street. 

JOS. THOBNHILL. 
Bricklayer and Contractor 

Particular attentionpaid to all kinds of FIRE WORK 

such as BOILERS, FURNACES, OVENS 

GRATES RANGES, etc. 



S-AJV FBANCISCO 

SCREW BOLT WORKS, 

PHELPS BBOTHEBS, Proprietors 

manttfactueers of ALL EINDB of 

Machine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, 'and Ship or 
Band Bolts. 

13, 15 and 17 Druuim Street, San Francisco. 4v241y 



San Francisco Boiler Works, 

1M And 12! Beale Street SAN FRANCISCO 

F. I. CURRY. 

(Late Foreman ol the Vulcan Iron Work.,) Proprietor. 




High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

BOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

SPIRAL BOILER. 

SHEET IRON WORK of every description done 
at the Shortest Notice. 

All kind, of JOBBING and REPAIRING promptly 
attended to. 17v25Jm 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

I > O I L E K MAEEBN 

AND (iESBRAl, MACHINISTS. 

Howard St., between Fremont and Beale, Ban Francisco . 



f-JHEET IRON PIPE. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET IRON AND ABPHALTTJM 
PIPE, of any size and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the least amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Car Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Cars. These small wheels are made 
of the best Car Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can b« 
fitted up with the improved axle and box— introduced by 
this company, and guaranteed to outlast any other 
wheels made in this State. 

■9~ All kinds of Machinery made and repaired. 

24v22-3m JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS. 




G. *& M. BARNETT, 

Manufacturers of Piles of every Description, 

Nos. 99. 41 and 43 Richmond street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

MILL SAW FILES A SPECIALTY. 

18v25-ly 



BURLEIGH 

ROCK DRILLS 

—AND — 

Air Compressors. 



The Burleigh Rock Drills, which have stood the tost 
of five years' constant use at the Hoosac Tunnel, and 
which are now in use in nearly every State in the Union, 
as well as In Europe and South America, are unequaled 
In efficiency and economy by any other Drilling Ma- 
chine. They are of various sizes, and equally well 
adapted to Tunneling, Shafting, Open Cut or Quarry- 
ing, and will drill six to ten inches per minute in gran- 
ite. They are driven by steam above ground. The Bur- 
leigh Air Compressor is the best engine yet dovised for 
furnishing the "air motor" for the many purposes to 
which it is now being used. 

They are to be used on the St. Qothard Tunnel, Swit- 
zerland; Tunnel 13 miles long. We refer to the follow- 
ing gentlemen and works : 

Gen. Newton, IT. S. A Hell Gate Tunnel, L. I. 

Mess. Shanley Hoosao Tunnel, Mass. 

J. Dutton Steele Nesquehoning Tunnel, Pa. 

Sidney Dillon Fourth Avenue Work, N. Y. 

Col. Roebling East River Bridge Company, N. Y. 

For further information, etc, adlress 

L. C. PARKE, 

VIRQINIA CITY, NEVADA. 
Agent foe the Pacific Coast. f!5 



NELSON <to r>OBEE, 



AQINTB FOB 



Thomas Firth & Sons' Cast Steel. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

{ Sledf[<*"i Hummer*. Stone 

Cutters*, lf.hK-kamll.hit* 

and Horse-Shoera' 

Tool*. 

18 and 1G Fremontstreet, near Market, San Francisco 
I0vl4or 



Pubchasebs please say advertised in Scientific Press, 



Britton, Holbrcok & Co., Importers of 

Stoves and Metals, Tinners' Goods, Tools and Machines; 
111 and 11- California St., 17 and 19 Da™ St., ban Fran- 
cisco, and -178 J St., Sacramento. mr.-ly 



16 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 5> 1873. 



Schell Creek Mining Company— Location 

of principal place of business. No. 304 Cahforniastreet, 
San Francisco. State of California. Location of Works, 
Sehell Creek Mining District, White Pine Oonnty, State 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 10th day of April. 1873, an assessment 
of ten cen'e per 6hare was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately, in United Mates 
gold com, to the Secretary, at the omce of the Company, 
No. 3fl4 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment snail remain un- 
paid on the 14th day of May, 1873. will be delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless payment 
H made before, will be aoldon Monday, the 2d day of June, 
1&73, to pay the delinquent assessments, together with costs 
■of advertising and expenses of sale. 

P. W. VAN WINKLE, Secretary. 

Office, No. 304 California street, San Franoisco, Cal. 
aplit 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming shares delin- 
quent on the above assessment is hereby postponed until 
Saturday, the 24th day of May. 1373, and the sule thereof 
until Monday, the 16tb day of June, 1873. By order of the 
board of Directors. „__,■ „ 

mlo P. W. VAN WINKLE, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming shares delin- 
quent on the above assessment Is hereby postponed until 
Satuiday, the 7th day of June, 1273, and the sale theieof un 
tfl Monday, the 30th. day of June. 1873. By order of the 



Board of Directors. 



P. W. VAN WINKLE. Secretary. 



POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming shares delin- 

Juent on the above assessment Is hereby postponed until 
riday, the 27th day of June, 1873, and the sale thereof 
until Monday, the 21st dav of July, 1873. 
By order of the Board of Dlreotors. - 

P. W. VAN WINKLE. Secretary. 



" 63" Gold and Silver Mining Company— 

Place of business, San Francisco, CaL Location of mine, 

Wallapal Mining District, Mohave County, Arizona. 

There will be a meeting of the stockholders of the "(S3 " 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 306 Montgomery street, on Monday, July 7th, 
1-373, at 3 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of adopting a Code 
of By-Laws for the Company. 

J. A. ALBERTSON, President. 

jn28-2t J. M. CASE, Secretary. 



Spring Mountain Tunnel Company— Prin- 
cipal place of business, No. 37 New Merchants' Ex- 
change, California street, San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works, Ely Mining District, Lincoln County. Nevada 
Notioe is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Directors, held on the 20th day of June, 1873, an assess- 
ment (No. 6) of twenty cents per share was levied upon 
the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately 
in United States gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, 37 
New Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 29th day of July, 1873. will be delinquent, and 
advertised forsale atpublic auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Monday, the 18th day of 
August, 1873. to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Directors. J. M. BOFFINGTON. Secretary. 

Office— 37 New Merchants' Exchange, California street, 
San Francisco, Cal. jn28 



The Sanderson Gold Mining Company— 

Location of works, Railroad Flat, Calaveras County, 

California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Direotorsof said Companv, held on the 20th day of June, 
1873, an assessment (No. 5) of fifteen (15) cents ner share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold and silver coin, tu 
the Secretary of said Company, at his office, in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Any stock upon which saidussessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 19th day of July, 1873. will be delinquent, and 
advertised f»r sale at public auction, and unless payment 
shall be made be ore, will be s'Jdon -Monday, the4lh day 
of August, 1873, to pay the delinquent aysessmentthereon, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses <-i sale. 
By order of the Board of Direciors. 

WILLIAM STUART, Secretary. 

Office, 113 Leidesdorff street, San Francisco, Oal. 



Silver Sprout Mining Company— Principal 

place of business, San Francisco, State of California. 

Location of works. Kearsarge Mining District, Inyo 

county, State of California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 3d day of June, IS73, on assessment 
of Three Cents per share was levied upon the cai'ital stock 
of the Corporation, payable immediately in United States 

told coin, to the Secretary, at the otiloe of the Company in 
an Francisco. Any stock upon which this assy s^ment shall 
remain unpaid on the loth day of July, 1873, will be delin- 
quent, and advertised for sale at public auction, ard unless 
Sayment is made before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 12th 
ay of Anuusi, 1873, to pjy the delinquent assessment, 
togctaer with costs of advertising ami expenses of sule. 
T. B WINGaRu, Secretary. 
Office, No. 317 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. )i 



Virginia Consolidated Mining Company.— 

Location of principal place of business, San Francis- 

co, State of California. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 

described stock, on account of assessment levied on the 

12th day of May, 1S73, the several amounts set opposite 

the names of the respective shareholders, as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Am't. 

George Hearst 11 4,090 $204 50 

GeorgeHearst 12 1,365 68 25 

Tyler Curtis 9 2,728 136 40 

Tyler Curtis 10 910 45 50 

And in accordance "with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the twelfth day of May, 
1873, so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may 
he necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the 
salesrooms of Maurice Dore & Co., 317 Montgomery 
Street, San FranciBco, California, on the 8th day of July, 
1873, at the hour of 12 o'clock, m., of said day, to pay 
said delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

T. B.WINGARD, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 13,318 California street, San Fran- 
ciBCO, California, je2l 

Yule Gravel Mining Company—Location 

of works, Viola Claim Township, No. 8, Placer County 

California. 

Notioe is hereby given, that at a meetins of the Board of 
Direotorsof sa'd Company, held an the 4th day of June, 
1873, an assessment (No. 3) oi Twenty Oents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock ol the Corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold and silver coin, to the 
secretary, atthe office of the Oompany, Room 5 and 6, No. 
302 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Oal. Any stock 
upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Wednesday, the 9th d:iy of July, 1873, will be delinquent, 
and advertised fur sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will he sold on Tuesday, the 29th day 
of July, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs 01 advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Directors. 

WM. H. WATSON. Secretary. 

Office, Room 5 and 6, No. 30'2 Montgomery street, Ban 

rancisco. California. 15 



SHAREHOLDERS, 

TRUSTEES, and 

SECRETARIES of 

ALL MINING COMPANIES, 

Should see to it that their Notices are advertised 
legally in THE DAILY MINING- PRESS, or 
the MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PKESS, at 
much less less cost than the usual rates of daily publi- 
cations. Every person interested in the prosperity of 
legitimate mining enterprises should favor Buch prac- 
tical economy. Send for circular of convenient date? 
for advertising, free blanks, and a copy of the New 
Code Corporation Assessment Law. 



GIANT POWDER. 

Patented May SO, 1868. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIANT POWDER, 3VO- 1, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GIANT POWDER, 3VO- ,23, 

For medium and seamy Rook, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and Gravel Bank Blasting, Wood, eto. 
Its EXCLUSIVE use saves from 30 to 60 per cent, in expenses, besides doing the -work in half the time 
required for black powder. 

ay The only Blasting Powder used in Europe and the Eastern States. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 
20v22-:Jmlfip General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



San Francisco Metal Market. 

Wednesday, July 3, 

Scotch Pig Iron,$ton $55 00 

White Pig, $ ton 55 00 

Refined Bar, bad assortment, % Tb 

Refined Bar, good assortment, $ lb 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 —05. 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 —0ft. 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 07&( 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 ... —08 ' 

Sheet, No. 21 to 27 —08 

Horse Shoes, per keg 9 00 

Nail Rod 11 

Norway Iron 9 

Rolled Iron 6>6 

Other Irons for Blacksmiths, Miners, eto. t>'« 

Ooppeb.— 

Braziers — 35 

Copper Tin'd..., —50 i 

O.Niel'sPat.... — 55 I 

Sheathing, ID — — I 

Sheathing. Yellow — 28 

Sheathing, Old Yellow ■ 

Composition Nails — 29 

Composition Bolts — 29 

Tin Plates.— 

Plates, Charcoal, IX ft box 14 50 

Plates, IOOharcool 13 50 

Roofing Plates 13 00 

BancaTin, Slabs, ft lb — 40 

Steel.— English Cast, ft lb — 20 

Drill 20 

Flat Bar 22 

Plough Pointa 16 

Russia (for mould boards) 17 

ZlNO SH 

Zino, Sheet — 9 

Nails— Assorted sizes — 5V 



67 50 
51 5U 
-06 

-tea 

-06 
— 07 


-is* 

— 09 



— 29 


-12« 


— 30 


— 30 


15- 


14 - 


13 50 


-«2» 


-25 


-17 


18 


10 


- 10 



Laws Concerning Corporations. 

[TJnder tlie New Code— January 1, 1873.] 

GENERAL PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL COR- 

PORATIONS. 
WAGON ROAD CORPORATIONS. 

WATER AND CANAL CORPORATIONS. 
HOMESTEAD CORPORATIONS. 
MINING CORPORATIONS. 
LAND AND BUILDING CORPORATIONS 
ALSO, MINING PARTNERSHIP LAW. 

A pamphlet containing the above provisions concern, 
ing Corporations has been printed from the Statutes of 
California. It furnishes those who wish these specia 
laws an opportunity of obtaining them for the small 
sum of 25 cents (post paid). Address, Dewey & Co., 
Publishers, and Patent Agents. S. F. 



L. P. McCasty. corresponding agent for the Mining 
and Soientifio Press, Pacifio Rueal Pbess, Illus- 
trated Press and the Journal of Commerce, is 
sojourning in this county a few days canvassing for 
subscribers for these publications. These papers are 
first-class and well conducted, and the information de- 
rived from them is of a sterling character and well 
suited to the requirements of the mountain population. 
Mr. McCarty was formerly a resident of this county, is 
a live agent, and his representations as to the character 
of these journals may be relied on.— -Democrat, Sonora. 



magazines. 

Harper's 

Atlantic 

Godey 

New York Ledger.. . . 

Blackwood 

Iloureat Home. .. . 

Good Words 

Peterson s 

Arthur 

Lady b Friend 

Harper's Weekly. .. 

Chimney Corner 

Literary Album . — 

London Society 

All the Vear Round. 
London III. News. 



W. E. LOOMIS. 

News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

8. E. corner of Sansome and 

Washington streets, 

SUPPLIES ALL 

Eastern Perodicais, 

BY THE 
Tear, Month, or Number, 



13 -J 



ieliini 



A LARGE, FRESH STOCK just In, of Pawtucket 
manufacture, for California trade, HEAVY, STRONG 
and DURABLE. TREADWELL & CO., 

8v26-eowl6p San Francisco, 



Frear Stone Company of California— Lo- 
cation of works and principal place of business, City 
and County of San Francisco, State of Californa. 
Notice. —There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment. No. 6, levied 
on the 27th day of May, 1873, the several amounts Bet 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares, Amount. 

Booth, LuctuB A 11 405 $810 

Booth, Lucius A 12 45 90 

Coleman, John W 64 400 800 

Cornell, ME 110 20 40 

Dam, G W 99 10 20 

Dam, G W 107 5 10 

Eniery.JS 34 460 900 

Spaulding, N W 15 405 810 

Spaulding, N W 16 45 90 

Spaulding, N W 19 405 810 

Spaulding, N W 20 45 90 

Syer.Robert 95 50 100 

Tripp.E 41 s 16 

Wegener, R, Trustee £6 5 10 

Wegener, R, Trustee... 72 11 22 

Wegener, R, TruBtee 73 34 68 

Wegener, R, Trustee 76 50 100 

Wegener, R, Trustee 90 250 600 

And »in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 27th day of May 1873 
bo many shareB of each parcel of said Stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Company, No. 414 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on Monday the 21st day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of one o'clock P. M., of said day, to pay said de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

ft _ „.„,.. R. WEGENER. Secretary. 

Office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. ' 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK, 

Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, Janu- 
ary 20th, 1873. 

HEAD OFFICE, IN GENEVA. 

CAPITAL, TWO MILLION DOLLARS 

SOBSOBTBED. — OHE-QUABTEB PAD) Up. 

PRESIDENT HENRY HENTSCH. 

SAN FRANGIS00 BBAN0H, 

SUCCESSORS TO MESSRS. HENTSCH & BEP.TON, 

527 CLAY STREET, S. F. 

Directors : 

FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT "WATT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on 
Eurone, and to transact every kind of Banking, Mercantile 
and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Securi- 
ties in Europe. Deposits received. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON: 

New York, Hamburg, Winterthur, Baden, 

Liverpool, Belllnzona, Bern, Chur, 

London, Berlin, Neuchatel, Shaffhausen, 

Paris, Frankfort, Locarno, Fribourg, 

Lyons, Geneva, Chaux-de- Lucern, 

Bordeaux, Zurich, Foods, Aarati, 

Marseilles, Basel, Solothurn, Lugano, 

Brussels, St. Gall, Lausanne, Mendrislo. 

A.ix Assay Office 

Is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz, 
ores and eulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option 
of the depositor. Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust and bullion can bo forwarded from any part of the 
country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo & Co.; or 
by checks. Iv27-3ra 



Ashcroft's Patent Steam 
Gauges, 

(Original — with Bourdon Spring). 

Steam Gauges, 
Vacuum Gauges, 
Registering Gauges, 
Test Gauges. 

Low JWater Alarms, Gauge Cocks, Glass 
Water Gauges, Cylinder Cups, Self-Oilers, 
£ oiler Felting, Seidell's, Tuck's, Hemp and 
Soapstone Packing* Stocks, Taps and Dies, 
Twist Drills, Drill, Lathe and Planer Chucks, 
Emery Wheels, Etc- 

Every description of Engineers' and Ma- 
ehinieta' supplies, for sale by 

TREADWELL & CO., San Francisco. 

2v26tf 




MAIN & WINCHESTER 




214 and 2ie Battery St., 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Have the Largest and Best 

Assortment of 

HARNESS, SADDLES, 
Bridles, 

WHIPS, 

SADDLEET, 

HARDWAEE. and 

Collars 

Of every description, of their 

own and other manufacture, 

Ever Offered on the Pacific 

Coast. 

26v5-3m 



SCIENTIFIC BOOKS FOR FARMERS 
AND GARDENERS. 



The latest works on Architecture, Agriculture, Poul- 
try, Domestic Animals, Small Fruits and Floriim'ture. 

Special orders will be made for anything not in btock 
without extra charge. Send for Catalogues. 

A. L. BANCROFT & CO., 

Booksellers and Stationers, 

23v26-eow San Francisco, Cal, 



ferHairFeltini 



For 
Steam 
8s Boilers 

SAVES 25 PER CENT. OF FUEL.— An item worth 
looking after. Also, Steam Governors, Tube Scrapers, 
Steam Pumps,"" Self-Oilers, Cylinder Cups, Steam 
Gauges, Belting, Lacing, Hose, Fuse, Packing, etc., id- 
cluding all kinds Miners', Engineers' and Mi 11 men's 
Supplies. TREADWELL & CO., old stand, Market St., 
head of Front, San Francisco. 8v26-eow 



Steam Boiler Manufactory 

— OF — 

JAMES H. SHANLEY, Successor toD. McDonald, 
Oregon street, below Front, Ban Francisco. 

All Sorts of Steam Boilers Made to Order 
and Repaired. 
Also, all kinds of Sheet Iron Work done promptly, 
and at prices to suit the times. Iv27 



THE NEW TJ. S. MINING- LAWS. 

The new Laws of 1872, governing the location and 
parcha&e of Placer and Quartz Mines and Agricultural 
Lands in Mining Districts of the U. S., printed in cir- 
cular sheet, for sale at this office. Single copies, 26 etc 
Usual discount to the trade. 



W. T. GARRATT & CO. 

CITY 

Brass and Bell Founder, 



A 



Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets, 

MANTJPAOTUBEBB OF 

Brass, Zinc and Anti-Friction or Babbet Meta 
caLSTirvGs, 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

TtVERX AND AND BELLS, OONbH, 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS. 

Steam, Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, 
and Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. 
Hose and all other Joints, Spelter, Solder and Cop* 
per Rivets, eto. Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil 
Globes, Steam Whistles. HYDRAULIC PIPES AND 
NOZZLES for mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fur- 
nished with Fittings, eto. Coupling Joints of all sizes. 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Work. Manufac- 
turer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 

•^"Highest Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, COP- 
PER and BRASS. 6-tf 

W. T. GAIUU.TI, JAMES FTTT, T.MAN, W, T. LITTLE. 



N. W. SPAT7LDLN G, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 
Nob. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market. 




MA2TOFACTUBEB OP 



SPAULDING'S 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 

They have proved to be the most du able and economi- 
cal Saws In the Woi.d. 

Each Saw is Warranted in every respect. 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



HALLIDIE'S 

Patent Endless Wire Eopeway. 

Covered by Numerous U. S. Patents. 

IMPORTANT TO 

Mining Companies, Civil Engineers, Con- 
tractors, Etc. 

The svBtem of transporting material, such as Ores, 
from the mine to the mill, Earths for embankments, 
Rock from quarries, etc., by means of steel wire rope, 
has been well tested and found more economical, 
advantageous and reliable than any other method 
of transportation; and to the annexed certificates In con- 
nection therewith I beg to call the attention of those in- 
terested: 

Eureka, Nevada, July 10, 1872. 

T. M*. Martin My dear Bir: On your leaving for San 
FranciBco, it gives me great pleasure to hand you my 
written acceptance of the HALLIDIE TRAMWAY put 
up by you upon our mine in Freiburg. 

It is a perfect success, discharging ten tons of ore per 
hour with two men's labor. It is perfectly simple in 
construction, and, aB far as I can judge, there is nothing 
about it to ever get out of order— nothing to wear out. 
While ours requires but about two thousand five hun- 
dred feet of wire rope, I can aee no reason why the line 
could not be extended almost indefinitely with equally 
happy results. Again, the carrying capacity might be 
doubled or quadrupled if desired. After set eral weeks 
trial upon our mine, the unanimous verdict of all who 
have seen it is a complete, unquestioned success. If 
this can bo of any service to you, use it in any way you 
think proper. Very respectfully, C. C. GOODWIN. 
Emma Hiix Consolidated Mining Co., i 
Little Cottonwood, Utah. I 
Superintendent'!' Office, Sept. 28, 1872. ) 

T M. Mabtin, E-Q..— *lr: The Ropeway constructed by 
you (HALLIDIE'S PATENT) for the Emma Hill Consoli- 
dated Mining Oomptny, has been built in a most substantial 
nnd workmanlike manner, and is at this time in splendid 
working condition. I most cheerful!/ accept the work tor 
the Company, and recommend it to others wiahingasurc 
and speedy transit tor ores over places impracticable for 
wflgon roads, e.tc. Respect lull v, 

L. W. cOLRATH, Superintendent. 

"The Vallejo works smoothly with the elevated wire 
tramway, which carries its loadof ore ae quietly and easily 
as if there was no winter or snow in th e world- 

'■ Whatever the objections to wire tramways may be on 
account of their cost. I have seen nothing yet that even 
approaches them in the facilities they afford for moving 
ore at all seasons of the year."— Correspoudent Utah Min- 
ing Journal, Alia, Jan. 8, 1873. 

The Vallejo Ropeway. 

The Vallejo Tunnel Company's Tramway in Little Cot- 
tonwood, built on the HALLIDIE PATENTED PLAN, is 
a comlpete success. It is between 2,300 and 2.J00 feet in 
length, and is supported by thirteen stations. The fall in 
this distance is about 600 feet, and the wire rope, which is 
three-fourths of an inch in diameter, will safely and easily 
deliver one hundred tons In six hours. The machinery is 
automatic, loading and unloading the sackB or buckets. 
About one t"n and a half can be sent down at one time. 
The stations are about two hundred feet apart,ond the entire 
apparatus Is strong and safe, As the wire rope is elevated 
aboutforty feet above the surface of thehill, the Tramway 
can be worked all winter long, without the slightest trou- 
ble.— Utah Mining Journal, Salt Lake, Sept. 23, 1872. 

Mining Companies and others desiring to negotiate for 
the erection of this sy&tem of Ropeway, oitn communicate 
with me personally, or through Postoffloe Box 064. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, Patentee, 

113 and 115 Pina Street, San Feanoisco. 
WIRE ROPE 
For hoisting from mines, transmitting power, Bbip rigging 
etc., of all kinds and sizes, on hand and made to order. 

Wire of all kinds and descriptions, furnished at lowest 
rates. A. S. HALLIDIE, 112 and 114 California St. 




An Illustrated Journal of Minings Popular Sclen 



RY T>EWEY *t CO., 

I *:i 1 «• 111 N.illilttll-.. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1873. 



VOLUME XXVII. 
3N"«rnt>ex* 3. 



Rickard's Improved Ore-Washer and 
Amalgamator. 

By referring to our cut, illustrating this 
invention, the modus operandi of the machine 
will be at once understood. 

A is a tank of iron, or other suitable material, 
through which water is constantly flowing, and 
into which the crude pulp is thrown. A shaft, 
passing through the drum, carries adjustable 
discs, b, b, c, c, /, /, made alternately of cop- 
per and galvanized iron. By using these met- 
als in combination, an electric current is 
engendered, which, it is claimed, will greatly 
facilitate the procoss of treatment. The discs 
are twisted on the shaft at any desired angle; 
or may be worked in pairs, inclined toward 
each other, giving a V form; or crossed, mak- 
ing an X section. These two latter arrange- 
ments produce what is known as the "fish- 
tail ' ' and ' ' double fish-tail ' ' motions, when the 
discs are rotated. For washing ores, the pulp 
is simply fed from above ; passes between the 
plates and is thoroughly agitated, the silt being 
washed off through a|waste-way ; while the heav- 
ier portion containing the free metal, sulphides, 
■etc., is collected at the bottom. When the ma- 
chine is used as an amalgamator, the copper 
plates are covered with the usual amalgam of 
mercury, which absorbs and retains the fine 
metallic particles, while the refuse is carried 
away. 

This form of ore-washer was patented recently 
by Mr. W. F. Bickavd, of Monitor, Alpine 
county, California, through the patent agency 
of the Mining and Scientific Peess. It is de- 
signed to work on pulp containing free metal, 
the heitvy sulphides, tailings and ores generally, 
as a washer and concentrator; to amalgamate, as 
stated above; and in a modified form is adapted 
to the manufacture of butter, the fish-tail mo- 
tion rendering it an admirable churn. The 
mode of attaching the agitating . discs is the 
striking peculiarity and the strong point of the 
invention. 

A dam is to be built at the lower end of 
Fordyce Valley, by the South Yuba Canal Com- 
pany, which will give them an unlimited sup- 
ply of water through the entire season. The 
company, according to the Transcript^ have 
now four artificial lakes, and this new one will 
hold three times as much as all the others. 
The dam will be of rock, and 650 feet across 
the top, at the hight of 50 feet; at the hight of 
75 feet it will be 750 feet on top. After this 
dam is finished, the miners who get their water 
from the South Yuba Company will have all 
the water they want. 



New Canal. — The new Canal of the Spring 
Valley Canal and Mining Company, at Chero- 
kee Flat, was completed on the 5th inst., and 
at 6 p. m. the water was in the discharging 
arm of the Dogtown pipe and flowed through 
towards Concow. This work, including 4,500 
feet of thirty-inch pipe, a portion crossing 
a depression six hundred feet in depth, and 
eight miles of canal, eight ft. in width, has 
been pushed through in ninety days, at a cost 
of $75,000, and the Company will now have an 
almost unlimited supply of water throughout 
the entire year. 

Idaho Mines. — Thomas Mootry, Jr. .writes us 
from Placerville, Boise, Idaho, that the placer 
mines are doing well, and that water is plenty. 
There are no idle men, and a good yield of 
gold is expected from all parts of the Basin. 
He says his mill and mine are doing first-rate; 
they are running 25 stamps on good ore. and 
plenty of it. 



Artificial Marble. 

The enterprise of manufacturing marble by a 
patented process was inaugurated in California 
by the Manhattan Marble Company, a few 
months since, and they are now in full running 
order. We paid a short visit to the factory in 
Oakland this week, to see what they were do- 
ing. The main building in which the marble 
is made, is 160x30 foot, and at present some 
twelve men are employed. The process of 
manufacture is the invention of Mr. Frear, of 
Chicago, the patentee of the Frear Stone. A 
peculiar gypsum, called Keene's cement, which 
is made in England, is the basis of the sub- 
stance, and the patented solution is employed 
to make a combination, which produces a hard 
and durable imitation of marble for useful and 
ornamental purposes. It is formed into a 
pasty mass, about the consistency of dough, 
and is run into moulds in which it remains 
about 24 hours. It "sets " rapidly and when 



however is only a matter of time, as they real- 
ly make handsome as well as useful ornaments 
and the prejudice against the color will rapidly 
woar away. The marbles all have a high polish 
which it is claimed is as durable as that given 
to the real substance. One advantage claimed 
for the manufactured material over the natural, 
aside from cheapness, is the fact that ink- 
stains, which go all the way through in the lat- 
ter and are difficult to remove, can easily be 
washed off of the artificial marble. Smoke, 
which stains white marble, can be easily 
washed off from this substance. 

As the demand for the artificial marble be- 
comes greater, the company iutend increasing 
their facilities proportionately. The factory is 
a fine, large building, well lighted and ventil- 
ated and in a convenient situation for shipping 
to the interior, being on the line of the rail- 
road. All the patterns used are made at the 
factory. It is well worth a visit to the office 
to see the varieties of marble made, some of 




RICKARD'S ORE WASHER. 



hardened is removed and exposed to the air for 
a short time. Before drying, the imperfections 
in the surface are removed by the application 
of sufficient of the soft substance forming the 
marble. The marble is then taken to a drying 
room, whieh is kept at a temperature of about 
100°, and remains there for a week's time. It 
is then put through the process of polishing 
and cleaning. 

The principal articles manufactured are man- 
tels, tables, table-tops, tiling for floors, etc., 
numerous samples of which are exhibited at 
the office of the company, No. 319 Pine street, 
in this city. The proportion and character of 
the several ingredients, used in making the 
marble, can be varied so as to produce varie- 
gated marbles of any desired color. The col- 
oiing material is added to the composition 
when in a plastic state, or to the solution with 
which it is moistened, and beautiful imitations 
of all varieties of marble are obtained. Among 
the varieties imitated successfully, we-'may 
mention Malachite, Sienna, Brocatello, For- 
mosa, Tennessee, "Waunooska, Levantel, Lapis- 
Lazuli, Italian, Jasper, Verd-antique, Lisbon 
and Bardiglio. The Malachite, particularly, 
is a very correct representation, as in fact are 
all the imitations. The marble is beautifully 
grained, and in the colored varieties the grain 
is seen to go clear through. 

These variegated and colored marbles are all 
more or less expensive and rare, when real, but 
the imitation can be manufactured at greatly 
reduced rates. As yet the demand for them is 
limited, since people on this coast are accus- 
tomed to use white marble ouly, and many be- 
lieve that no such stone exists as is imitated 
by several patterns shown. Their introduction 



them being exceedingly beautiful. Of course 
the artificial product is furnished at a much 
cheaper rate than natural marble; the more 
elaborate the design, the cheaper it is propor- 
tionately. As it is all moulded while in a plastic 
state, it naturally costs less to produce than 
marble upon which the designs must be cut 
by hand with mallet and chisel. The grain is 
quite fine, making it susceptible of a high pol- 
ish. It can be readily understood that, with 
the capacity of making any kind and color of 
marble, there is more scope in design than is 
usually the case, and the colors can be harmo- 
niously blended to suit any taste or fancy. 
Nor does it require any argument to prove, 
after seeing how it is made, that this marble 
can be sold cheaper than the natural substance. 
It is probable that before long an extensive 
trade in artificial marble will spring up as its 
economy becomes known and the uses to which 
it may be put are extended. This factory is 
one more addition to the manufacturing es- 
tablishments of our State. 



A Mines working in a claim in Calaveras 
county, who has been running a tunnel for 
three years in hard bed rock, and got in 800 
feet, had to quit on account of ill-health, and 
sold out. He went to work for wages for the 
new proprietors and in three weeks struck the 
gravel channel he had been looking for so long. 

Quick Teaming.— The Pioche Record says, 
Jackson's mule teams (ten animals to each team 
and each drawing three wagons) came from 
Toano to Pioche in ten days and five hours. 
They were loaded with merchandise. This is 
the quickest time ever made between Toano 
and Pioche by loaded teams. 



The Indian Troubles In Arizona. 

The Apaches in Arizona are again on the 
war-path, and their signal fires are visible in 
the mountains about Tucson. They are, as 
usual, well armed and equipped and ready to 
do as much damage as possible. This is a 
good time to send some of the advocates of 
"peace policy" to Arizona to gat an idea of the 
"situation" in that region. As their "situa- 
tion" is, however, usually in a political office, 
or a strong fort, or under a good guard when 
traveling, they might not comprehend the 
subject properly, nor see it in the same light 
as the settlers do. Dispatches from Tucson 
would indicate that the Indians have better 
facilities for conveying information than the 
military. 

During the late temporary peace the Indians 
have had the freedom of the country and know 
the situation of every cabin; and it ib probable 
that death and destruction will be dealt out to 
the settlers and their effects, with more serious 
results than ever before. These Indians were 
whipped into submission by General Crook, 
the only man who has been been able to do it; 
and they were then put on the reservations 
where they had nothing to do; were fed and 
clothed, and had arms and ammunition given to 
them. The general's peace policy is extermi- 
nation, and that is probably what it will 
come to in the -end, after all the peace 
commissioners and army contractors have 
filled their pockets. This policy has been 
a failure with the Apaches ever since it 
was first inaugurated; and how much longer it 
will be continued, depends, probably, on the 
longevity of ths tribes, -and the supply of 
money in the- United States Treasury. If Gen- 
eral Crook gets permission to "go for" those 
redskins again, in his own way, it would not 
be a bad idea for the settlers, as there is no 
telegraph, to intercept all messages and mes- 
sengers from the outside world until he has a 
chance to "clean out" all the Indians. By 
this means no word could be sent to General 
Crook, until he had given them a sound thrash- 
ing and an idea of the power of the Govern- 
ment. There is one consolation, however. No 
Peace Commissioners will be likely to risk 
their precious skins in Arizona just now, at 
least net in proximity to the Indians. 

"We want to see a rapid settlement of this 
Indian question in Arizona, as it is without 
doubt one of the richest Territories in the 
United States fn mineral wealth. Men are now 
sitting idly on dumps of ore worth thousands 
of dollars, which are of no value to them, as 
there are no mills to crush it, and capitalists 
will not invest in the country while Indian 
disturbances are so frequent and dangerous. 
The fact that the mines now there can afford 
to ship ore, over a rough and circuitous route 
at great expense, to this city for reduction, is 
sufficient guarantee of the mineral wealth of 
the Territory, and an indication of what could 
be done under favorable circumstances. 



English capitalists propose promoting rail- 
road enterprise in China. It is in contempla- 
tion to furnish a gift of rolling stock and ten 
miles of road, with a view to induce the Em- 
peror to sanction a net-work of railroads. 
Half of the capital stock has been subscribed, 
and the rest is expected. A call for a public 
meeting has been issued, under the auspices 
of the Lord Mayor of London. 



Bullion.— Over 65,000 bars of Cerro Gordo 
bullion passed over the Los Angeles and Wil- 
mington railroad last year, and the Los Angeles 
Star says there will be a material rise in this 
figure the ensuing year. 



18 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



|0R 



RESPONDENCE. 



Notes of Travel in Eureka and Elko 
Counties, Nevada. 

[By our Traveling OorreBpandent.] 
Palisade. 
The point of our first divergence from the 
0. P. R. R., to visit the mines of Eastern Ne- 
vada, is looated at a point on the Humboldt 
River, where Pine Creek empties into the same, 
and 573 miles east of your city, and is situated 
at an elevation of a little over 4,000 feet above 
the sea level. Palisade contains about 150 in- 
habitants, and in the new county of Eureka; 
out off of Lander County by an act of the last 
Legislature. It is important as a point of di- 
vergence from the C. P. R. R-, to nearly all of 
the mines of Eastern Nevada. From this point, 
where you arrive on the afternoon of the sec- 
ond day out from San Francisco, at 3:12 p.m., 
you take stages of 

Woodruff & Ennor, 
For Mineral Hill, Eureka, Hamilton, Treasure 
City, Eberhardt and Pioche. 

They are among the oldest stage men in this 
State, and own three separate stage lines; viz: 
Virgina City, Schell Creek and "White Pine 
which is the name of the one between Palisade 
and Hamilton, and is 125 miles in length. 
Three sets of careful drivers manipulate the 
reins between these two points, and thirteen 
changes of horses are used, six to each team; 
fine Concord coaches are used, and the time 
occupied in transit between Palisade and Ham- 
ilton is from 22 to 23 hours; fare, $25. 

Mineral Hill 
In Elko County Nev„ is the first mining camp 
met with on this route ; it is located 35 miles 
nearly south of Palisade, at an elevation above 
tide-water of 6,100 feet. It contains about 250 
inhabitants, has one hotel, saloon and black- 
smith shop, and four mercantile establishments. 
To show the liberality and patriotism of Min- 
eral Hill, $600 in coin has been collected to 
celebrate the Fourth of July with, and it is 
scarcely yet one year, since a terrible fire swept 
the entire town away, with a very slight in- 
surance. The following are the principle mines 
of that district. 

Mineral Hill Silver Mining Co., 
(Limited) is an incorporation of English capi- 
tal, the works and mines of which are located 
at Mineral Hill, Elko county, Nevada, of which 
I spoke at length in my letter to the Pbess 
July 20th, 1872. Some changes (local) have 
taken place since my last visit to this compa- 
ny's works, but none of note. Mr. H. H. Oakes 
is still the Superintendent. 

This company was incorporated in the year 
1871, since which time they have extracted and 
shipped $1,072,000 in bullion, being a yield of 
$392,000 since my last visit a twelve month 
since. 

This corporation are at present working 60 
men in their mines, and are crushing all the 
ore they extract at their Attwood mill, which 
has fifteen stamps running by steam, and re- 
duces from fifteen to twenty tons per day, ac- 
cording to the hardness of the rock. 
The Taylor Mill. 
The new 20-stamp miU owned by this com- 
pany, has been lying idle for twelve months 
past; in fact, they only run it some two months 
after it was completed. It is a very fine struc- 
ture and cost this company some $135,000 to 
erect; it is now on sale and several parties have 
signified their intention to purchase the same. 
It is a splendid mill to any company that have 
use for it. This corporation have no need for 
any more than fifteen stamps, which they have 
in their Attwood mill. 

The mines of this company do not look so 
flattering as they did one year ago, but 
economy in accordance has been introduced, 
in the several departments by Superintendent 
Oakes, and mining agent F, Hoskins. 
The Spencer and Austin Mines 
Are working two or three men each, extracting 
some good ore, but are not driving their work 
on acccount of having no mill of their own, 
and the high price of reducing ores charged by 
the custom mills, which, I understand, is $35 
per ton. 

Hardscrabble District 
Is a new district, located April 15th, this year, 
and is situated about five miles east of Miner- 
al Hill, Dr. Hanson and R. H. Haysmau I 
learn were the locators, and also present own- 
ers of the 

Clarendon Mine, 
The first discovered in this district. This mine 
lies in slate formation, with regularly defined 
walls. The course of this ledge and pitch is 
that of all the prominent lodes of this country, 
and has the appearance of a permanent one. 
It is being developed by atunnel now in sixty- 
five feet, at which point it is forty feet to the 
surface, and shows a ledge of free milling sil- 
vei ore six feet thick; from some ten assays 
made it shows an average of $100 per ton. 
The general character of the ore of this dis- 
trict, however is base metal and of a limestone 
formation, in a belt of quartzite, where the 
mineral is found running north and south near 
the base of the mountains, and pitohes east- 
ward at an angle of forty-five degrees, the 
width of which has not yet been obtained. Lo- 



cated in this latter formation and prominent 
among those now being developed is the 

Waverly Mine, 
Located and owned by Mitohell, Rosenthal & Co. 
This mine has been developed to a depth af 25 
feet by a shaft, and a contract for sinking 25 
feet more has just been let; from 10 different 
assays from the average ores of this mine, it is 
shown that it contains about $30 per ton m sil- 
ver besides the lead— the definite amount of 
which has not yet been ascertained. It is cer- 
tainly a very promising mine; about one mile 
south of the Waverly is located the Stars and 
Stripes mine, which is being vigorously work- 
ed at this writing, and assays well in silver. A 
little north of the Waverly mine is located the 
Maricopa Mine 
Similar in character to the above in every re- 
spect, and is being developed by a deep open 
cut, and shaft. This company are working 3 
men, their rock averages $30 per ton in silver. 
It'is owned by parties resident at Eureka, and 
superintended by Mr. Hadley, one of the orig- 
inal locators. L- P- Mc. 



Cherry Creek Mines. 

George W. Doane, one of the most persistent 
and reliable prospectors in Nevada, has re- 
turned from a trip to Cherry Creek and vicini- 
ty, and exhibited to the White Pine News 
some specimens found by him in that locality. 
The News has no hesitation in pronouncing the 
rock exhibited the richest that any section 
ever produced, and its similarity in general ap- 
pearance to that found in the Comstock, leads 
us to the belief that a rich camp has been dis- 
covered. The presence of particles of pure 
gold and silver, in different varieties of rock, 
prove its richness, and the quartz formation 
in which it is imbedded adds additional proofs 
as to its extent and permanent value. George 
tells as that a great many miners, prospectors 
and speculators are daily making their appear- 
ance in the new oamp ; and all express un- 
bounded faith in its future. The towns, foun- 
dations of two of which have been laid, are 
being built up with stores, residences, and. the 
various adjuncts to a mining camp, as rapidly 
as lumber can be obtained for the purpose, 
and present appearances denote a large camp 
in the future. Among the lucky owners of 
mining claims there are Hunter & Briggs, the 
original locators of the district, and who are 
well known as former owners of the ranch 12 
miles west from Eureka, now the property of 
Billy Nichols. They are made of the right 
kind of stuff to open up a new district, and 
are said to have faith enough in their new pos- 
sessions to spend every "quarter of a dollar" 
on its development. Accommodations for man 
and beast are said to be plentiful, and of the 
best quality. Mollinelli, of Austin and Schell 
Creek fame, has established a branch of his 
hotel there. The lumber used for building 
purposes is being supplied by Sanford Hall 
and partner, and the capacity of their mill, al- 
though kept running night and day, is not suffi- 
cient to supply the demand. Situated so near 
splendid milling facilities, Eagle Canon being 
only five miles from them, the owners of the 
mines cannot possibly fail to make a good 
thing from shipment of ores this season. We 
have every faith in the success of this district, 
and before snow again flies, we are confident 
of being able to chronicle many sales of min- 
ing grounds there and good results to purchas- 
ers of the same. Eastern Nevada is in a fair 
way to redeem itself among mining men, and 
White Pine county will yet foot up in wealth 
and population equal to any in the State. 

New Mines at Sitka. 

The quartz brought down here from Sitka by 
the passengers aboard the "California," and 
some of the crew of the same vessel, has been 
subjected to a rigid test by Captain Fisk, and 
a portion of it has proved to be quite rich. 
The specimens sent to Major Wood, the 
Adjutant-General of this Department, yielded 
at the rate of $100.45 per ton for the poorest 
rock and $276.15 for the best. This would 
readily prove the value of the mines, for the 
specimens have been taken entirely from the 
surfaoe. 

Another specimen of rock, somewhat differ- 
ent to the preceding, failed to yield any metal 
to the test; so that the region it was taken 
from must prove valueless in minerals. 

Major Wood and half-a-dozen others have 
formed a Company for the development of 
their mine, and work will be commenced as 
soon as capital enough has been secured. 

Some splendid copper mines have been dis- 
covered at Fort Wrangell, and they are said to 
be as valuable as any yet found on the coast. A 
telegram received from San Francisco last even- 
ing, by Purser Goodhue, of the "California," 
stated that the assay of this copper would make 
it worth from $60 to $90 per ton. Should the 
whole prove as valuable as the specimens 
tested, the mine must be exceedingly rich, and, 
of course, highly remunerative to those hav- 
ing the energy and capital to work it. 

At Galena a mine has also been discovered, 
some twenty miles from Vancouver. An 
analysis proved that it contained only seven 
per cent, of galena, the remainder being prin- 
cipally silicates and kindred matter; but it 
contained silver enough to be worth ©20 per 
ton. * 

The discoverer has resumed prospecting, 
and if a mine which has minerals containing 
fifty per cent, of galena is found, a company 
will be organized here to work it.— Portland 
Bulletin. 



Snpply of Nickel. 

Those bodies called metals, which in one 
form or other of combination constitute an im- 
mense proportion of the whole mass of our 
globe, and whose number as elementary bodies 
classified by the chemist, far exceeds-that of all 
other supposed elementary bodies, are by their 
unusually varied physical and chemical prop- 
erties of the very highest value to mankind; 
yet it would be short-witted wisdom to say that 
they are the most important bodies known to 
us. The metalloids are really just as import- 
ant, for without their help the metals, in what- 
ever state we found them, would prove intract- 
able. The metals force themselves upon the 
notice of the most ignorant; the value of the 
metalloids is only seen through the medium of 
chemistry. It is a subject of curious interest, 
and not devoid of usefulness, to notice how the 
distribution and the chemical and physical pro- 
portions of the various metals influence their 
cost — quite apart from mere fluctuations of 
market value due to the course of trade. How 
abundantly is each to be found in any state — 
how easily, or with what difficulty is it got into 
the metallic state from natural combinations— 
or how into new combinations to become valua- 
ble ? When reduced to regulus, what are its 
properties ? Is it hard, rigid, tough, or soft, 
easy or hard to fuBe ? Is it beautiful and glit- 
tering ? Does it tarnish or rust ? Does it al- 
loy valuably with other metals ? All these, 
and the answers to a hundred like questions, 
are involved in the inquiry as to any known 
metal. What is its value as a material, and 
thence presumably in the market ? Gold and 
platinum, through the combination of their 
scarcity and their respective special properties, 
are called precious metals. Although we have 
in these latter days tracked the gold to its 
home in the quartz rock, we find it everywhere 
scattered in fragments relatively so small and 
widely diffused, that the cost of its segregation 
largely enters into, and often equals or exceeds 
the current or standard values of the metal, 
and its value in the market has decreased with 
the increased abundance drawn from California 
and Australia. But its chief uses are for coin 
and objects of luxury, and were new sources of 
gold discovered, such as to increase a thousand 
fold the supply, it is difficult to see other uses 
of very great value to which it could be put. 
Its price would, therefore, probably rapidly 
decline, and the chief effect of such a discovery 
might be to derange, through its influence as a 
standard of value, the markets of the world. 

Not so platinum . The total annual product 
is vastly below that of gold, and its price per 
pound is also much the lower. Why is this so, for 
except its beauty, it possesses most of the val- 
uable properties of gold; and some besides 
special to itself ? The answer is, there are but 
few and small uses to which platinum has ever 
been applied. Yet to what endless and import- 
ant uses in the arts, in chemical manufactures, 
in metallurgy, in cookery, even in architecture 
and shipbuilding, might we not apply this 
metal were its supply to become sufficiently 
abundant. But there is no prospect or even 
hope of this, and so the parsimony of its dis- 
tribution rendes this metal, though Bcarcer 
than gold, and though unique in its combina- 
tion of valuable properties, a declining one and 
below that of gold. This is even more certainly 
true of those ourious metals that, in excessively 
small proportions, accompany platinum in its 
crude state as worked from the sand. Palladium, 
rhodium, iridium, osmium, etc., may be said to 
be almost without use; their scarcity forbids 
any attempts to find a use for them — hence 
they have no real value. 

Their price depends upon circumstances as 
factitious as those which make to the dilletante 
that of a unique engraved agate. With the 
exception of iron all the much-employed metals, 
lead, copper, zinc, and tin, are very easily 
smelted, and their ores, (excepting those of tin) 
largely and widely diffused. Hence, great as is 
their value, vast as is the demand for them, 
their prices within moderate periods of time 
remain pretty steady so far as natural causes 
are concerned, and only vary much through 
the intervention of fiscal causes. In a differ- 
ent class stands iron, and may one day stand 
alluminium. In the state chiefly of oxides 
both are found scattered broadcast as the dust 
beneath our feet. But oxides are terribly sta- 
ble compounds in both cases, and in both the 
price is mainly dependent on the cost of isola- 
tion from the ore. This cost is larger even 
still with iron, considering the scale on which it 
is worked, but in the case of aluminium it is 
almost prohibitory — involving as it does the 
previous isolation of nearly the most oxidable 
metal known, sodium. Yet should means be 
found hereafter, as it is probable they will be, 
to reduce it as readily as iron, the metallurgy 
of alluminium may yet play a great part in the 
world. What numberless and important uses 
could this metal be pnt to; possessing the ten- 
acity nearly of iron with the lightness of glass; 
malleable, ductile, difficult of fusibility, and at 
common temperatures showing — small tenden- 
cy to combine either with oxygen or sulphur. 
Again, viewed in this compound aspect of 
their determinants of value and of price, man- 
ganese, chromium, cobalt and nickel, may be 
classed together. Of the first the natural sup- 
ply is practically boundless, but the difficulty 
in reducing it to metal, the high fusing point, 
and the great affinity for oxygen, have hitherto 
prevented its physical properties becoming 
sensibly and fully known. Its uses as a metal 
are few and its value small, while its price is 
high. But cobalt, chromium, and nickel form 
that curious group of metals of which the nat- 
ural distribution is sparsu and rare; their uses 



few but important and well ascertained, and 
the price necessarily high. Cobalt and chro- 
mium may be said to so far have no value in 
their metallic state — the coloring powers of 
their combinations constituting their chief 
value, which is enough, however, to maintain 
a high market price for both, but especially 
for chromium. Like titanium, the uses of 
which are widely diffused — vanadum, and in- 
deed a large catalogue of others — it is more 
than doubtful whether cobalt or chromium 
have ever been seen in a state ot metallic puri- 
ty. It would be worthy of national expendi- 
ture to make on several of these little known 
metals extensive experiments as to their isola- 
tion in purity, and their physical and useful 
properties so, and as alloyed. 

We have been led to these remarks by the 
announcement lately made that the price of 
nickel had advanced so considerably as to 
hamper the manufacture of German silver, 
and that should it further advanee to 30s. per 
pound, that trade would for a time be stoped. 
Nickel is obtained in commerce chiefly from 
kupper nickel, and from speiss, a sulpho- 
arsenate of nickel, and other metals, produced 
in the processes for obtaining cobalt. For 
long it was neglected as a useless and unknown 
pest to the copper miner, whence its name; 
but at length one use for it was found — name- 
ly,, to whiten the alloy of copper and zinc so 
as to form German silver. To the present 
time, notwithstanding that the means have 
peen found by M. Gaiffe, of Paris, to deposit 
pure nickel by the electrotype, it may be said 
to have but this one use in the arts. Its price 
was, we believe, at one time no more than 3s. 
or so per pound. What has produced the 
scarcity? In a small way this ib an inquiry of 
as much interest as that of coal. 

The peopling of "the lone lands " of the 
New World and of Australia, the spread of 
wealth and desire for comfort everywhere, 
have no doubt tended to expand the German 
silver trade into a very large one, which has 
been fostered and helped by electro-plating— 
a rather later developed art. But is it through 
demand overtaking supply that the great, 
enhancement of price has risen? We should 
like much to be made sure of this in the 
first place. It ought not to be forgotten that 
there are a few of the metals, amongst which 
is nickel, that by reason of their comparative 
rarity and relations to the arts readily lend 
themselves to a monopoly even in the hands 
of a single large capitalist. Quicksilver was 
made such a monopoly of by the Rothschilds 
some years ago, and the attempt was revived 
only two or three years since, but Californian 
supplies had made it more difficult. 

Bismuth, a metal produced in extremely 
small quantity, even since Australian ores 
have supplemented those of Europe, yet of 
great importance to some arts as increasing the 
fusibility of alloyB, is also one that has ad- 
mitted of a monopoly, raising its price to a 
guinea per ft). Is nickel now included in the 
category? If it be not, if the price be really 
due only to scarcity in proportion to the de- 
mand of the German silver trade, then ought 
those interested to bestir themselves in finding 
new supplies of the ores. Nickel is always an 
accompaniment of the palaeozoic and Bo-called 
ozoic rocks. Some of its most valuable min- 
erals have been found in large quantity in the 
Lacustrian rocks of Canada, and there is good 
reason to believe it to extend in larger quanti- 
ties to the north of the " Lake of the Woods," 
and in other places in British North America. 
" A prospecting " of these and other places 
would be now opportune. 

It has long been currently stated, that Dr. 
Percy many years ago, when engaged by the 
firm or Evans & Asker, of Birmingham, in ex- 
periments made professionally for them on the 
production of German silver, found that man- 
ganese could be substituted for the nickel, and 
this rumor of scientific circles has received 
confirmation by a recent letter under the well- 
known signiture of "Y" in the Times, wherein 
the writer urges the substitution to be now 
made, which it is alleged was only prevented 
before by trado considerations. If it be so, by 
all means let the metallurgist at once set to 
work to circumvent Nature's niggard supply, 
or the monopolist, wherever it be, just in the 
same way as King Bomba's sulphur monopoly 
came to an end under the domineering influ- 
ence of pyrites. We confess, however, we do 
not anticipate very much here from manga- 
nese. 

The fact that this last metal will whiten the 
alloys of copper and zinc was, if we be not 
mistaken, known from the days of Achard in 
Germany, but its power to produce a uniform, 
staple tough alloy in substitution of nickel is 
quite another thing. The extreme difficulty of 
purification, the great oxidability, the extreme 
hardness, and the slender affinity for either 
copper or zinc, of manganese, render it very 
unlikely to produce a German silver of a trac- 
table and durable character, even if unexcep- 
tionable in point of color and lustre. The ex- 
periments made by Messrs. Montefiore, Levi & 
Co., of Liege, for the .Russian Government, 
upon the introduction of manganese into 
bronze and phosphor bronze for cannon, quite 
sustain our anticipations of failure — though wo 
by no means wish to discourage an exhaustive 
trial, which could not but be undeniably valua- 
ble at least. But meanwhile though the 
sources of nickel are restricted, they are capa- 
ble of great extension whence we have indica- 
ted and from elsewhere. To supplement large- 
ly the raw material is the true and obvious 
remedy either for a real scarcity of the metal or 
for an artificial one produced by aprocryphal 
statements or by monopoly. — Engineer. 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



19 



ECHANICAL ^OGRESS. 



American Iron in England. 

The only important advantage after a con- 
sideration of the coal question, which England 
has over the United States at the present time 
in the production and manufacture of iron, 
is cheap labor, and this advantage is gradually 
disappearing under the continual and success- 
ful efforts which are being made in that coun- 
try to securo a better price for labor. This 
fact is already patent to English iron masters 
and to capitalists there in general. Indeed, we 
are already occasionally furnishing iron for 
English workers in that motal, as will be seen 
by the following extract, from the London Col- 
liery Quardian, which extract also shows what 
they think over there on this important matter. 

"The present anomalous oondition of the 
coal and iron trades of this country has re- 
ceived several striking illustrations during the 
last few months, bnt we question if any more 
startling fact has been recorded than that men- 
tioned in the letter of our Wolverhampton cor- 
respondent, who has learnt, from a trustworthy 
source, that an order for 1,000 tons of iron for 
consumption in England is in course of execu- 
tion in America, and will be delivered on our 
shores at a lower price than it can be bought for 
on the spot. It is also stated that axles are being 
sent over by American manufacturers and de- 
livered in England at £3 per ton lower than the 
rate asked by home producers. This is a turn- 
ing of the tables, indeed; only to be matched 
by the recent literal fulfilment of the adage 
aoont sending coals to Newcastle. 

The causes of this anomaly are not difficult 
to ascertain. At the root of them all lies the 
simplo question of labor. The pre-eminence of 
our country as the workshop of the world was 
almost wholly due to the abundance, and con- 
sequent oheapnessof labor. Our rivals in new 
and undeveloped fields of industry felt this dif- 
ficulty to be almost insurmountable. This is 
sufficiently proved by the fact that our Ameri- 
can cousins, notwithstanding the hedge of 
" protection," thrown round their manufac- 
tures, have been outstripped in their own 
market by English producers. No human fore- 
sight could have predicted the strange revolu- 
tion which has taken place in the English labor 
market during the laBt two years. We have 
referred, time after time, to the mischief which 
could not fail to result from the extravagant 
demands of the laboring classes, but sooner 
than we oould have anticipated that mischief 
has become apparent. 

The aspect of the iron trade, especially in 
the inland districts, presents something very 
much akin to stagnation, and it is clear that 
in a very short time, without some speedy and 
unlooked-for change takes place, the furnaces, 
mills, and forges must in many cases cease 
operations. The masters aver that, in the 
present condition and temper of the labor 
market, nothing can avert this serious collapse 
in trade. The matter rests, therefore, to a very 
large extent, with the men, or rather with 
those who have led them on to this situation of 
perplexity. 

The question ia a most important one, and if 
great mischief is to be avoided, it will not 
admit of much further delay. It would be well 
if those who in defiance of all the simplest laws 
of political economy, have forced up labor to a 
purely fictitious value, would have the courage 
to confess their error, and employ their influ- 
ence to modify the disastrous consequences 
which threaten commerce, and which their 
mistaken policy has mainly helped to bring 
about." 

The labor question and the scarcity and high 
price of coal, however, are not the only things 
which are tending to transfer to this continent 
the workshops of the world. The inventive 
genius of our people is more earnest than the 
English in seeking out new devices to do away 
with hand-labor. Much of the work which in 
English shops ia done by hand is done here by 
machinery, and at a greatly-reduced cost. The 
English are not an inventive people to any- 
thing like the extent to which the Americans 
are. This fact is also fully acknowledged by 
our friends over the water; for the very article 
from which we have quoted so largely above 
contains the following sentence: "We, in thia 
country, have relied too much on our cheap 
labor supply, and have paid too little regard to 
the wonderful scientific progress in the provis- 
ion of labor-saving machinery, which our trans- 
atlantic rivals have been making." 

While we entertain no feelings of triumph 
at any success which the mechanics of this 
country may gain at the expense of our English 
friends, we nevertheless hold it a matter of 
duty, as faithful chroniclers of "mechanical 
progress," to keep our readers informed of all 
such changes as they are brought to light. 

The Agricultural Society of Breslau, Ger- 
many, offers a prize of $700 in gold for the 
steam-plow apparatus which will work best at 
trials to be made on the farms near that city 
this summer. 



The Future Supplies of the Superior 
Metals. 

The use of metals has grown so rapidly of 
late years that the question is often seriously 
put, are we sure of adequate supplies? That 
can only be answered by a review of the source 
from whence we may expect to derive them. 
Copper, although it has risen in value more 
rapidly than any other metal, in oonseqnenco 
of stocks being low, and because the price a 
short time ago was so poor aa to atop numbers 
of mines, can be supplied ad libitum. The 
world is full of copper. England and Wales 
are rich in the metal. Ireland abounds in it. 
There are good lodes of copper in the Penin- 
sula. In the Himilays stones of oopper orop 
up. Australia possesses it in various direc- 
tions. But it ia in the western hemisphere it 
is most abundant. It lies almost iu every di- 
rection. In Canada, the United States, both 
eaat and west of the Rocky Mountains; on the 
slopes of the Andes; iu Chili and Peru it ap- 
pears in every form and in overwhelming 
quantities. 

The supply oanuot fail at the present rate of 
consumption for thousands of years. Lately 
the price has gone down notwithstanding the 
new uses to which it has been put. In fact, 
the demand fell off, supplies increased, and 
stocks became so large as to weaken the mar- 
ket. Lead. — There exists no apprehension as 
to the supply of lead. The price has not ad- 
vanced during the active years for the metal 
trade, 1871-72, at all in proportion to that of 
copper, tin, or iron, but it has advanced, and 
is likely to do so conaiderablyiul873. 

There can bo no lack of copper, for Corn- 
wall, Shropshire, South Wales, Ireland, the 
Iberian Peninsula, Australia, and the United 
States of America, can produce all that will be 
wanted for ages to come. Black lead in cer- 
tain forma and black jack exist in Cumberland, 
Westmoreland, Derbyshire, Ireland, and in 
various countries abroad in quantities ade- 
quate to all possible demand for a time to 
come incalculable. The metals which are lit- 
tle used, or produced in the smalleat quanti- 
tiea, auch as platina, nickel, manganese, etc., 
are to be found in quantities sufficient for the 
demand in California, and especially in Colo- 
rado and Nevada. 

Quicksilver ia especially the product of Spain; 
much of what we import we export. The met- 
al ia also found on the Pacific elopes of the 
E-ocky Mountains and Cordilleras. Tin — This 
is a metal more prized than it has ever before 
been, and than any other of the metals greatly 
in use except the precious metals. Cornwall 
and Devon had the monopoly of its production 
from the days when the Phosnicians flocked to 
Marazian to exchange Tyrian cloths for it. The 
discovery of this metal in the Dutch settle- 
ments of the Straits added vastly to the supply, 
and it is now reported that in South Australia 
there is a considerable tin area, and in Queens- 
land also; from the latter some freights have 
actually arrived. There ia no prospect of its 
being too abundant, and although it haa lately 
rapidly dropped in value, it ia destined to 
bring a high price until some new and more 
extensive discoveries are made of it. — Mining 
and Commercial Times. 

A New Cement— Pfundite. 

There is a mineral found in Northampton 
County, Ponn., which is made up as follows: 

Silloa 61.30 

Alumina 21.85 

Oxide of Iron Kit) 

Lime 1 30 

Magnesia .63 

Hygrometer moisture and loss 82 

100.00 

Mr. Anthony Pfund, of New York city, who 
has invented a method of utilizing this min- 
eral, in the manufacture of hydraulic cement, 
has given to the mineral the name of Pfun- 
dite. 

By heating the mineral to a red heat, the 
Bilica ia caused to combine with the oxide of 
iron, and with parts of the alkaline earths, and 
if this product is mixed with sulphate or car- 
bonate of lime, the mass is claimed to poaeesa 
the properties of a valuable hydraulic cement, 
becoming hard in a short time, and capable of 
reaisting moisture. 

Another composition of which the Pfundite 
is a base, ia as follows: 

The mineral is mixed with from three to 
four parts of carbonate of lime to one part of 
silica alumina, and oxide of iron and alkali. 
This mixture is formed into bricks which are 
burned at a read heat, and when cold, pul- 
verized. The product ia claimed to be a su- 
perior hydraulic cement. 

Another composition ia made aa follows: 
The mineral is heated to a read heat, and then 
mixed in the following proportiona: Pfundite, 
one part, hydraulic lime, cement, or plaster 
of Paris, two parts; coal ashes, from five to 
aix parts. This last, mixed with a sufficient 
quantity of water, is formed into bricks, or 
may be used for coating and fire-proofing 
walls. 

Other mixtures may be made with various 
ingredients, and of various proportions, and it 
seems probable that the mineral, which is the 
principal ingredient in all of them, will prove 
to be of high industrial value. 




Impurities in Lead. 

Lead which is made in a blast furnace is 
always soft, ductile, and flexible, bnt lias only 
slight tenacity. A freshly cut surface has a 
bright lustre, which soon disappears. It soils 
the hands, paper and linen goods. It can be 
rolled without tearing; when melted has a 
white color, and beautifully smooth surface; by 
higher oxidation shows a play of colors which 
however, differ but little from those on impure 
lead. Pure lead shows Blight oryst iline struct- 
ure, and, on the whole, the surface has an 
evenly fused appearance; if cryatalization ap- 
appears on the surface it ia due to unequal 
solidification. Such lead, when heated almost 
to its melting point, shows, on breaking, a col- 
umnar fracture. A white color on the surface 
and on the fracture are special signs of impure 
lead. Many poor sorts of lead are perfectly 
white from impurities, but then the color is 
due to silver rather than tin. The hardness of 
lead is due principally to the presence of sul- 
phur, antimony, and arsenic. These impuri- 
ties diminish its ductility and malleability; but 
such lead will offer greater resistance to com- 
preaaion. Contamination with a amall quan- 
tity of the oxide of lead, mechanically mixed, 
is an advantage if it has to bear a strain. If, 
on the contrary, ductility is required, as for 
sheet lead and foil, oxidation must be avoided 
as far as possible when fusing. Copper has no 
influence on its hardness, but if iron and cop- 
per combined with sulphur are present, the 
lead is hard. The sulphur compounds melted 
at a higher temperature harden the lead; at a 
lower temperature this is not the case. When 
melted at a low temperature, the sulphurets of 
the metals colleot on the surface, and such 
lead, when used for making white lead, shows 
irregular dark shades. 

Lead takes up one per cent, of zinc, and leaa 
than one per cent, of iron; the amount of cop- 
per taken up increasea as the temperature. If 
it does Eot contain over one to one and a half 
per cent, of antimony, it may be smelted in a 
reverberatory furnace, air being admitted. The 
pure lead separates and flows out, while the 
sulphides of the metals remain, even when they 
are oxodized by the use of nitre, and separated 
in this way. If more antimony is present, 
which is the case with Spanish lead, the oxi- 
dation is prolonged, and a hard lead is ob- 
tained, while the slag contains much antimony. 

As yet no successful method or process has 
been devised for perfectly separating antimony 
and lead. Even refined lead contains always 
very small quantities of sulphur, iron, tin, and 
antimony, and a somewhat larger quantity of 
copper. If it is entirely free from tin and an- 
timony it exhibits, when fluid, a splendid play 
of colors. Pure lead is recognized by a fine 
scum, which covers it when fused, but which 
tears on moving the surface. Soft lead breaks 
with a fibrous fracture, and the surface is coated 
with beautiful red and blue colors. If the 
lead contains zinc, or zinc and antimony, it 
appears of a beautiful white ; tin and zinc 
are less common, but antimony, usually in 
combination with sulphur, gives to blast-fur- 
nace lead its peculiar white color and hardness. 
Since sulphur compounds of copper, antimony, 
iron, and arsenic are melted into leadathigher 
temperatures, it must first be purified from 
these as far as possible before any further use 
is made of it. 

As regards impurities in lead that has been 
purified, there is always a trace of iron present, 
also antimony, which is, however, combined 
with very small quantities of silver. If the 
copper is to be all or very nearly all removed, a 
number of successive smeltings is necessary. 
The higher the temperature, the more oopper 
can be taken up, about one and a half to two 
per cent. ; if considerable sulpher is present, 
the coper combines with it, and may be more 
easily removed, because almost the last traces 
of sulphide of copper rise to the surfrce and 
can be skimmed off. Lead purified thus con- 
tains but 0.1 to 0.2 per cent, of copper. 

For many technical uses it is not necessary 
to have the lead so perfectly pure, but for glass, 
and in making white lead, small impurities are 
injurious, which are much less so in sheet lead 
or lead pipe. If lead used in making white lead 
contains much copper, it gives a faint reddish 
shade. This red color disappears entirely, if a 
sufficient quantity of the gasses are admitted 
during its manufacture, and scarcely appears at 
all, if there is a stronger current of air, and the 
red color is more perceptible in the interior of 
the white lead. When sulphide of antimony is 
present, the red is no longer perceptible. Pure 
lead melts at 625° to 635Q Fah., and solidifies 
quietly with depressed surface. Heated almost 
to fusion, it becomes brittle, and breaka in 
pieces under the hammer. At a white heat, in 
the absence of air, it boils and begins to give 
off vapor. — G. Brlgel in Berlin Ohem. 80c. Proc. 

Soluble Glass. — The employment of sol- 
uble glass in the chemical and industrial arts 
is constantly increasing, and its value ia now 
fully established. Recently a cement of great 
hardness and various applicability has been 
produced by mixing defferent bases with this 
singular substance. It is found that, combined 
with fine chalk and thoroughly stirred, it will 
produce a hard cement in the course of six or 
eight hours. With fine sulphate of antimony, 
a black mass is produced which can be polished 
with agate, and possesses a superb metallic 
lustre. Fine iron dust gives a gray black ce- 



ment. Zinc dust produces a grry mass exceed- 
ingly nard, with a brilliant metallic lustre, so 
that broken or defeotive zinc castings can be 
mended and restored. 



Cause of the Decomposition of Eggs. 

The question of the decomposition and 
decay of eggs has been the object of numerous 
experiments, some of which seemed to lead to 
opposite conclusions. A committee of the 
French Academy have arrived at the following 
conclusions: 

1. Eggs that have not been shaken can be 
preserved quietly without fermenting or decay- 
ing. 

2. Shaken and broken eggs decompose in 
less than a month. 

3. In no stage of decay is the slightest trace 
of an organism, either animal or vegetable, to 
be found in the egg. 

The decomposition of eggs, with all signs 
of decay, and without the presence of any 
microscopic organisms, is contrary to Pasteur's 
theory, according to which every destruction 
of organio matter, and its conversion into its 
inorganic elements, is due to the development 
and increase of small organisms. TJ. Gayon 
has made some new experiments on this sub- 
ject, the results of which are given in Comptea 
Rendus, vol. 76, p. 232. 

By exposing unshaken eggs to the atmos- 
pheric air, at a mean temperature of 77° F., 
he found that one portion of the egg under- 
went decay, the other did not. 

On making the same experiment with shaken 
and broken eggs, some decayed, others did 
not, even for several months. 

In all cases where the eggs remained sound 
it is impossible to discover the slightest trace of 
an organism; on the contrary, in all those 
which decayed there were numerous micro- 
scopic organisms from the species of vibrones 
and mushrooms. 

These facts contradict the previous supposi- 
tions. Without anticipating any decision 
which may be obtained by further experiment, 
Gayon inclines to the opinion that the germs 
of organisms are originally present in those 
eggs which decay. 

New HoETicTTLTrjKAL Feetilizeb. — Some 
time since we called attention to a new chem- 
ical fertilizer for horticultural purposes, sug- 
gested by Dr. Jeannel of Paris. Lea Mondes 
of recent date, in commenting on results 
obtained by its use, says that it represents the 
fertilizing principles of at least one hundred 
times its weight of concentrated animal 
manure, and supplies to the plants nitrogen, 
phosphorus, potash, sulphur, and iron in a 
completely soluble state. The compound 
consists of 400 parts of nitrate of ammonia; 
200 parts biphosphate of ammonia; 250 parts 
nitrate oi potash; 50 paits muriate of am- 
monia; 60 parts sulphate of lime, and 40 
parts sulphate of iron. These ingredients are 
pulverized and mixed. One dram of the pow- 
der (about a teaspoonful is then dissolved in a 
quart of water and a wineglassful of the so- 
lution given two or three times a week, in 
accordance with the health and luxuriance of 
the vegetation. 

The plants may be placed in any kind of 
earth, however poor, even pure sand, cr may 
not be potted at all. It is stated that certain 
flowers, the fuchsia, for example, may be 
cultivated without earth by simply placing the 
stalk in a jar, at the bottom of which is 
an inch or so of water, just sufficient to 
cover the ends of the roots. To the fluid a 
proportional quantity of the fertilizer is added, 
as above specified, once in eight days. The 
foliaceous development of plants treated with 
the substance is said to be truly wonderful, 
and yet the rapid growth of the leaves does 
not interfere with the most luxuriant flowering. 
To this we may add that quite recently we 
have tried a compound nattily composed of 
the majority of the substances above detailed, 
merely as an experiment, on a small and 
sickly fuchsia. The plant was drooping and 
little else remained than a half dry stalk. 
After two applications of the fertilizer, its 
effect was apparent, and at the end of ten days, 
during which probably half a pint of solution 
had been supplied to the earth, new shoots 
had sprung out, leaves formed, and the entire 
plant became perfectly loaded down with buds. 

How Deltas aee Foemed. — It appears from 
the observations of Mr. David Robertson, F. 
G. S., that in fresh water panicles of clay 
were held suspended for a long time before 
wholly subsiding, while salt water, or a mix- 
ture of salt and fresh, became comparatively 
clear in the course of a few hours. The results 
showed that water only slightly brackish had a 
great power in precipitating the clay, and from 
this he concluded that the great bulk of the 
clay carried down in solution by rivers must 
be deposited before it could reach any great 
distance from the seashore. This may throw 
some light on the formation of deltas, and on 
the silting up of the river courses within the 
influence of the tides. It may also assist in 
determining how far the glacial mud, for ex- 
ample, could be carried into the seas by tides 
and currents. 

Renewal of the Rewaed of One Hundeed 
Thousand Dollars.— The Legislature of the 
State of New York has recently renewed, for 
the period of one year, the offer of one hun- 
dred thousand aollars reward for improvements 
in canal navigation. This will be good news 
to scores of inventors, 



20 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



Table of I^uotuations. 

ShoiZg Behest and Lowest "Regular" Sales of Mining Stocks ™® e *°% s d M™ 
Sal Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, during the last Four Weeks, together 
wit h Number of Feet, Shares, Last Dividends and Ass essments. 



NAME OF COMPA1H 



"WASHOE. 

Alamo Gold and Silver M. Co 

Alpha Consolidated 

Alta w .j 

American l'lat 

Arizona & Utah.... .......... 

Bacon Mill and Mining Go. . . 

Baltimore Consolidated 

Belcher 

Best& Belcher 

Bowers •■'■ 

Buckeye 

Caledonia Silver Mining 60. 

Central •■ 

Central No. Two 

Chollar-Potosi..... ...... .... 

Confidence Silver Mining Co. 

Cons. Gold Hill Quartz 

Consolidated Virginia 

Cook* Geyer..... ............ 

Crown Point Gold and S. M. 

Daney.... 

Dardanelles 

Empire'MiU and Mining Co. 

Exchequer 

Flowery 

Franklin 

Gould i' Curry Silver Mining 

Hale & Norcross 

Imperial 

Indus 



Justice. 

Kentuck 

Knickerbocker . . 

Lady Bryan 

McMeans ± k . . 

Mint Gold and Silver Mining 

New York' Consolidated... 
Occidental. .......... ■ • • • - ■ ■ 

Ophir Silver Mining Co... 
Overman Silver Mining Co 

Phil. Sheridan 

Pictou ■ 

Rock Island 

Savage — .•■••;■:■ 

Segregated Belcher. 

Segregated Caledonia..... 
Senator Silver Mining Co. 

SierraNevada 

Silver Hill 

South Overman. .... ... . . ■ -. • 

Succor Mill and Mining Co. . 

Sutro 

Trench 

TJnion Consolidated. 

Woodville Gold and S. M. . . . 
Yellow Jacket. 



NEVADA. 

Adams Hill..- .-■.--■■;,■ 

Alps Silver Mining Co. ...... 

Amador Tunnel and Mining, 
American Flag Mill and M. 

Arkansas 

Belmont 




MOO 

l.snlHi 

I 

r..|limi 

In 

1-1 

.Mill) 
KiOdO 
ii ' 

■jimnii 
10800 
20000 
28000 

■U'.wi 
'201)110 

■J:a«iil 
'J .1111X1 
lliiiliilli 
■J.IIILUI 
24000 

■ime 

60000 

flillil 

12000 



27, July, ' 
16, ' July,' ' 



39, Feb., 
6, May, 



- .July, 
2, July, 



311000 

IMIlliI 
21000 

; no 

■iwm 

UBIIIII 
50000 

1 

IIB.HII.I 
lllllllll 
liMPH 
I'JMIO 
24000 
30000 

l\ 

I1I11111) 
6400 
101100 
2 0100 
20000 

.-illlllll 
2 0100 
22-mi 
21 1 

60 

330110 
2000O 

2UHIII 

2- 

2 1000 



g 



3, June 3, 



7, Jan. 21, 
45, Aug. 6, '72 
4, Feb. 5, '73 

4, Feb."i3,"'7 
10, Mar. 18, '7 



JnnelS Ju ne a 5 July a July *> 



... 15, June 11. '73 
... 1, Sept. 4, '72 
'73 6, May 28. '73 
'63 6, May 28, '73 



21, May, '67 



13, June 10,('73 
9, June 26, '72 



36, Oct., ' 

April, ' 

30, June, ' 



_ July V- 
18, June 9, '73 
40, July 1, '73 
16, Apr. 8, '73 

_, _tfay"5, 
14. June 9, 
6, June 24, '73 
10, Apr. 25, '73 
- Mch.24, """ 



1, May 6, 



1, Mch., '69 
22, Men. '64 



52, June, '6 



4, May 31, ", 
1, Feb. 8, ". 
26, June 24," 
26, June 4, " 

_, June 19, " 
1, June 20, " 
9, Apr. 5, '• 
14, July 20, " 



II, Jan., '71 
2"bct!;" ; 71 



i, June 24, ' 
36, April 17," 
1, Dec. 24, " 



Cbapman Mill and Mining. 
Charter Oak Silver Mining. 

Chief of the Hill.. 

Cbief East Extension....... 

Columbus Mill and Mining 

Condor ,".\ri"j ' 

Eureka Consolidated 

Excelsior ..... . ... .......•■-- 

Harper Silver Mining Co. . , 

Hermes 

Home Ti cket . . - - - - : - ... ■ 

Huhn & Hunt Silver Mining 
Ingomar Silver Mining Co. 
Ivanhoe 



Jackson - - ■ ■ ■ ■ •; — 

Juniata Consolidated. 

Kentucky Gold and Silver. . . 

Kinston 

Lehigh. ^.... 

Lillian Hall 

Louise 

McMahon 

Marion 

Meadow Valley 

Mocking-Bird 

Monitor Belmont 

Murphy -„-.■'-■"■ X — 

Newark Silver Mining Co... 
Pacific Tunnel and Mining. 
Page & Panaca Silver Mining 

Peavine 

Pbcenir -- — 

Pioche Silver Mining Co. . . 
Pioche "West Extension — 

Pioche-Phcenii. 

Portland 

Raymond it Ely 

Silver Peak ■ • - - 

Silver "West Consolidated. , 
Standard Mill and Mining, 

Star Consolidated 

Starlight.... 

Sterling 

Spring Mount 

Sjprinc Mountain Tunnel. 

Ward Beecher 

Washington and Creole... 
Yellowstone 



CAULPOBNIA. 

Alpine 

Bellevue 

Calaveras Gold Mining Co. 
Cederberg Gold Mining Co. 

Consolidated Amador 

Cottonwood Creek 

DnnderbergMill and Mining 
El Dorado Ind. Quartz M. 

Eureka Gold Mining Co 

Gillis 

Independent Gold Mining.. 

Keystone Quartz 

Mt. Jefferson 

Oakville Quartz Mining Co. . 

Rye Patch 

St. Lawrence Mill and M. Co. 

St. Patrick 

Tecumseh .. 

Yule Gravel 



IDAHO. 

Empire 

Golden Chariot 

Ida Ellmore 

Mahogany G. and S. Mining 
Minnesota Gold and Silver. 

Red Jacket 

South Chariot 

War Eagle 



"WHITE PINE. 

General Lee . 

Mammoth Silver Mining Co 



Original Hidden Treasure. 

Silver Wave 

Ward Beecher 



UTAH. 

Desert t Consolidated — 
Wellington 



300U0 

:;uiioo 

::<" 

HI 

■■'. m 

360U0 
50000 
25UU0 
.''.Kill HI 

1'JOlHl 

mm 

-mum 



mi 

Minim 
50000 
500IJO 

.JillHHI 
:!,lli!UI 
:annm 
15000 

30000 

: i 

:: 

tiiiimii 
^iiiiim 



1S73. 



i I 



Wil- 
is 



IX l'A 



71 
72 

5," Nov. 26, '72 



June 13, ' 

May 6. ' 

1, Men. 12, ' 

15, Jan. 4, ' 



3, Dec. 23, '72 

4. May 6, "*" 

1, June 4, 

2, June 3, 
~ Jan. 18, '73 



46 

6«» 



2',, 
7« 
12'j 
3M 



l'A * 

4 3« 

37 3lii 

39>< 34 



17, July, ' 



40000 

3OI10O 
50000 

201100 
35000 

liiiiiiii 



3, Aug., '72 



51 1 

251 HOI 
31 H Ul 
35000 



3, May 5, 

3, Mch. 4, 

1, Moh. 3, 

2, May 23. '73 

1, May 28, '73 

2, April 26, '73 
1, Sept. 12, "" 

i,'j'u'n'e"20,''72 

1, Jan. 27, '73 

4, May 10, '73 

6,"MaV'i2,"'73 
4. Men. 1, '73 

2, Dec. 12, '72 

6, June 25, '73 
1, Jan. 17, 73 

. 6, June 2, '73 
. 1, Aug. 26, '72 

CJan'-'ls"']! 

3, Sept. 15 '72 

4, June 19, '73 
1, Doc. 9, '72 

7, May 30, '70 
1, Dec. 5, '72 



110 
l'A 



H F 



75c 75c 
32 29 



1214 8\j 
97 88 
4S i'A 



1% l'A 

i'm 



19 

'oX " 5Sf 
59'- 53 
7* 7 
2 2 
97 92 



6 5A 
ISM i'A 
10K S'A 



18 1% 

12'A 11 

il'A 40 

6% b% 



W Vi 

8)2 8 

UK 10,'i 
4f4 3% 



lJs 1 
4K 4 



46 36 



* 1 



8« 
4)4 



iva 16,« 

hi ■■■■• 

5! 53 

7 6% 



110 



lOS.'s 100 



•m 21. 
1« V4 
13 11. 



IS IX 

104ii VA 

WA 9* 

4 3« 



m TA 

97 87)^ 
4Sf 4!4 



50 

m 



i% i« 



5K 
9« 



2« 

1'4 

1313 



34 30K 
38K 31,'s 



35c 20o 39c 30c 

50c 37c 

139 120 

55M 48Ji 55 60 



1 1 

U!i 10^ 

20 19 

2 1'4 
i'A Hi 



IK 1 
6 i'A 



4, Apr, 10, '73 



3, Feb. 3, '73 

4, May 12, '"" 
11, May 28 

3, Feb. 21, '73 

4, May 16, '"" 

3, May 6, 
1, May 6, 

■>!'Aprii'3,'73 

4, June 10, '73 
1, May 16. '73 
3, June 19, '73 



1, July 15, 

2, Jan. 15, '73 
6, June 20 "" 



8, April 25, '73 



2K 



'A 'A 
2K 2 
3 2« 



12000 

2i 

20000 
24000 



20000 

211 

25000 
liiooii 
25000 



2 

3000C 

101.100 



., Feb '73 
5, April, '73 



., May 13, '73 
6, April 14, '73 
3, Feb. 12, '73 



26000 

II 

10000 

lllllllll 

20000 



2 10 

30 

20(1011 
21333 



July 20, '72 
Apr. 2, '73 



1, Men. 11, '73 
6, Oct. 31, '72 
20, May 28, '73 
3, June 4, '73 



9, Mcb., '71 
6, Feb., '70 
1, Aug., 



25o 25o 

23M 'i\M 



l'A 1 



1 



20c 20c 

40c 10c 
S'A 8 
1 1 
3!» Wi 



61 



66 



3, April 10, 
9, May 26, .. 
9, Mcb. 25, '73 
9, June 11 ' " 
6, May 21, 

-. May*23,'73 
1, Nov. 4, '™ 



6, Jan. 9, '73 
12, Mch. 3, '73 
14, May 31, '73 
8, Oct. 9, '"■' 

K'Nov.Tl, '72 



U'A 12* 

'¥ii "o" 

"i" "3)4 

75c 50c 



30c 25c 

3 '., 3 '., 
2K 2K 



U 



l?B K l 

40c 25c 

35c 25c 

S'A SA 

1'4 l'A 



65 61 
1% l'A 



i% 2jb 



75 50 
10Ji 10 
20 19)4 



3 l'A 

35c 35c 

10c 10c 

l'A 2!1 

40c 15c 



12)s WA 



i l'A 

571.0 Oil.c 



25c 5c 
"i'A "l 



62K? 30c 
23" '20)4 



jS 



30c 
162JJ 127'; 



02', c 50c 
1(1'., 10 
20)j' 20 



87!;C 73c 



'i'A "5)4 



4 3A 
1)4 1 
25c 25o 



10c 10c 



Hi 



1S» l'A 

50c 30o 

50c 20c 

S'A 8K 

4>4 3? 4 



11« 



)4 i 
151. 10 
i'A 5 



45c 40c 
'VA '"i'A 



15 11 

5 4i4 
10'.i 8K 
10)3 B, 1 * 



40c 40c 

-,m SI; 



tsi 

<j 

n 

M 

M 

o 

> 

Kl 

05 



50c 60c 

18)4 18 W 
4>4 4) 
7 7 

15 12 
5 4 

3 l'A 



a 
c 



ASSESSMENTS, MEETINGS, DIVIDENDS. 



Note. 
hat date. 



A Sh.areh.olders' Directory— Compiled Daily for the Mining' Press. 

-In the Stock Boards an assessment is delinquent thirty days from the date of levy, exclusive o 
The delinquent dates given in .this list are those of the minirji* ofliceB. 

ASSESSMENTS.— Stocks on the Lists of the Boards. 

Location. No. Ami. Levied. Delinq'nt. SaZe. Secretary. Place of Business. 



Company. 

Amador Tunnel M. Co. Ely District 

.■VmerK-imFlj.^M.tfcM.i'o. .EhDist. 

Arizona A Utah 

Baltimore Con. M. Co. "Washoe. 

BellevueM. Co. Placer Co., Gal. 

Chief of the Hill M. Co. Ely District. 

Consolidated VirR'nia M. Co. Washoe. 

Chief East Extension M. Co. 

Daney G. & S. Co. 

El Dorado Quartz M. Co. 

Emuire M. & M. Co. 

Globe M. Co. 

Gould & Surry S. M. Co. 

Golden Chariot M. Co. 

Hale A Norcross S- M. Co. 

Huhn & Hunt M. Co. 

Hayes G. & S. M. Co. 

Hermes M. Co. 

Julia G. & S. M. Co. 

Justice M. Co. 

Jackson M- Co. 

Kentucky G. & S. M. Co. 

Kentucky G. M. Co. 

Lady Franklin G. & S. M. Co 

Mahogany G & S- M. Co. 

McMahon S. M. Co. 

Minnesota M. Co. 

New York Cons- M. Co. 

Noonday M. Go. 

Ophir M. Co. 

Overman S. M. Co. 

Peavine M. Co. 

phcnisS.M. Co 

Pictou M. Co. 

Pioche Phenix M. Co. 

Pioche West Ex. 

Portland S. M. Co. 

Rock Island G. M. Co. 

Senator S.M. Co. 

Silver West Con. M. Co. 

South Chariot M- Co. lumiu. 

Spi-itiu; Mountain Tunnel Co. Nev. 

Star Con. M. Co. Nevada. 

Teciiinseh; G & S. M. Co. 

Yule ©ravel M. Co. Placer Co . Cal. 



Cal. 

Wishoe. 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Idaho. 

i. Washoe. 

Ely District. 

Robinson Dist. 

Ely District. 

Nevada, 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Ely Dist. 

Cal, 

Cal. 

Idaho. 

Nevada. 

Washoe. 

Washoe. 

Washoe 

Ely District. 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Ely District. 

Ely District. 

Ely District. 

Washoe. 

American Flat. 

[Nevada. 

Idaho. 



1 00 June 4 

1 50 Jnne 3 

1 00 Jnne 1G 

75 June 3 

50 April 14 

50 May 23 

3 00 June 11 
20 May 28 

51 May 28 
10 July 3 

1 00 Ju> elO 
25 July 2 

100 June 9 

2 00 May Sfi 
5 00 Juiy 1 
1 50 Mnyl2 

25 May 16 

3 00 May 10 
60 June 9 

1 00 June 24 
10 June 25 

1 50 June 2 
20 June 23 
50 Julyl 

2 00 June 11 

25 June 19 

[ 00 May 21 

£0 May 31 

25 May 21 

5 00 June 24 

4 00 June 4 
25 May 12 
25 May 28 
20 Jnne 19 

1 00 May 6 
50 May 16 
25 May 6 
5ft June 20 
50 June 24 
25 June 10 
50 May 23 
20 June 20 
10 June 19 
25 May 28 
20 June 4 



July 10 
July 9 
July 21 
July 8 
Way 19 
July 1 
July 16 
July 2 
July I 
Auk 11 
July 14 
Aug. 4 
July 14 
June 30 
Aug 2 
June 16 
June 19 
June 16 
July 12 
July 29 
July 29 
July 21 
July 24 
Anp 15 
July 19 
July 25 
June 27 
July 2 
June 27 
Juiy 25 
JulyS 
June 11 
Julv3 
July 21 
June 19 
June 24 
June 9 
July 20 
July 29 
Jury 17 
June 30 
July 29 
July 24 
July 1 
July 9 



July 30 
Aug. 4 
Aug 12 
July 31 
July 30 
July 21 
Aug. 7 
July 30 
July 25 
Aug 29 
Aug. 6 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 4 
July 21 
Aug 22 
July 16 
July 15 
July 14 
Julv 31 
Aug 19 
Aug 18 
Aug 11 

Aug 8 
Sept 15 

Aug 4 
Aug. 19 
July 21 
July 31 
July 21 

Aug 18 
July 28 
July 12 
July 23 

Aug. 8 
July 11 
July 22 
July 15 
Aug. 12 
Aug 18 
Angl2 
Juh 21 

Aug 18 
Aug. 18 
July 19 
• July 29 



L. Kaplan, 
Geo. R Spinuey, 
Joseph Maguire, 
D. F. Eagley, 
T- F. Oronise. 

C. S. Neal. 

D. T. Bagley, 
R. Wegener, 
Geo. R. Suenney, 
G. W. R King, 
Geo. R. Spinney, 
Joseph Maguire. 



Merchants' Ex. 
iljilGalilorniast 
■m» California st 
401 Californiast 
J33 California st 
419 California st 
•101 California st. 
414 California st 
320 California st 
411 California st 

3201'nHlbrniast 

419Caifori 



A. K Da lb row, room 22, Merch's'.Ex 
L. Kaplain, Merchants' Exchange 
J. F. Lightner, 438 California st 

T. W. Golburn. Merchants' Exc'ng 
Geo. R Spinney. 320 California st 
4113-i California at 
0, 419 California st. 
414 California st 
419 California st 
509 Montgomery st 
Grass Valley 
507 Montgomery st 
Express Bld'g 



B. B. Minor. 
A. Noel, Room 
R. Wegener. 
H. O. Kibbo, 
J. P. Oavallier. 
Geo. Fletcher, 
J. S. Luty, 
E.McKaddin, 
Geo R. Spinney. 
Wm. Willis. 

H. O. Kibbe, 
J. Ma-guirc. 
J. Marks, 
W. W. Stetson, 

C. F. Balcolm. 
Joseph Maguire, 
S. Phillips. 

C. E. Elliott. 
T. W. Colburn. 
B.J. Gray. 
W.E Dean. 
Henry Boyle, 
F. K. Bunker, 
J. L. King 



320 Californiajst 
416Califoiniast 
419 California st 
419 California st 
Merchant'sEx 
414 California st. 

420 Montgomery st 
419 California st 
408 Calif oriiia f st 
419 California st 
414 California st 
438 .California at 
4)9 California st 
Stevenson's Bld'g 

3b Montgomery st. 
411 California st. 



_ . M. Bufllngton, St N. M. Exchange 
Geo. R. Spinney. 320 Califoruiast 
T J.Herrmann, 418 Kearny st. 

W.H.Watson, 302 Montgomery st 



Other Companies (not on the Lists of the Boards.) 



Atlantic & Pacific Con. M. Co. 
AiiiL-ls Quartz M. Co. 3 

Auburn G. M Co. Placer Co., Cal. 

Beckwith M. Co. Ely District. 

Brown's Vallev Cons. M. Co. ) 

Buena Vista Vinicultural Society, Cal. 
Buaker Hill M. Co. Cal. 1< 

Caroline M. Co. Ely District. 

Central Land Co. Cal. 

California Beet Sugar Co. Cal. 

Cederberg FirsiN.Ext.G. iS.M.Co. Cal. 
Central Coal M. Co. Cal. 2 

Central Polyiies'aLandCo.NaviEators Is 
Clear Lake Water Works. 
Commercial Coal M. Co. Cal. 

Daisy Jdill G. M. Co. Grass Valley. 

Dutch Flat Bine ©ravel M. Co. 
East Idaho M. Co. Cal . 

Eclipse & Lee '-. M. Co. Cal. 

Emerald Hill M. Co. Utah. 

Enterprise Gravel M. Co. Gras- Valley. '. 
Eureka M. & Smelting Co, Eureka Nev. 
Eliza M. & M. Co. Siskiyou Co., Cal. 
Equitable Tunnel <fe M. Co. 
Freur Stone Co. Cal. 

Granite Tunnel M. Co. Cal. 

Grace M. Co. Schell Greek. 

Great Blue Gravel Bangc. Cal. 
Greenville M. Co. Plumas Co.. Cal. 

Grand Duke Tunnel & M. Co. Ulah. 

Green "Valley M. Co. PlacerCo., Cal. 
Heckerdorn G. «fe S. M. Co. Cal. 
IBa-ioe M. «fcM- Co. ManpoiraCo. 
Herinignera Mining Co. Lower Cal. 

JLadv Estcn Tunnel <feM. Co. Utah. 
La Paz M. Co. Ely District. 

Ladv Emm i M. Co. Cal. 

Men'dha S. M. Co. Nevada. 

Manhattan Marble Co. Cal. 

Wazeppa S. M. Co. Elv District 
Newton Booth Con. Ely District. 
Omcca Table Mountain M.Co.Cal. 
Orients. M. Co. Nevada. 

Placer G M. & Canal Co. Cal. 

Potrero Land Investment Co. 
Phenix Tunnel & M. Co. Utah. 

Pioneer Cons. M. Co. Nevada. 

Potrero Land Investment Co Cal. 

Plvmout" Rock M. Co. Utah. 

Prospect M. Co. Grass Valley. 

Recent Cons. M. Co. , ut > l11 . 

BiNintrStarS. M. Co. Idaho. 

Rubv Hill Tunnel Co. Nevada. 

Sanderson G. M. Co. Cal. 

Schuylkill Quartz M. Co. Cal. 

Stanislaus Water Co. Cal. 

Stanislaus Water Co. Cal. 

Starr KJngM. Co. Nevada. 

South Emma M. Co. n Utah. 

Silver Sprout M. Co. Inyo Co., Cal. 
Sacramento Valley Reclamation Co. Cal. 
Stickle Quarlz M. Co. ' Cal. 

Schell CreekM. Co. Sehcll Creek. 
Spring Mount M. Co. Ely District. 

State of Maine M. «fc M. Co. Cal. 
Summit M . Co. Amador Co., Cm. 

StevensPaciflc Smelting A; >* r 
San Jacinto Tin Co. Cal. 

The City Gardens, S. F. 

Victoria and Imperial T. &M. Co. Utah. 



1 25 

10 00 

20 

20 00 

5 00 

5 00 

50 



4 00 

20 
1 00 



10 
10 

1 00 



25 

50 

3 00 



June 20 
March 4 
April 24 
July 7 
June 27 
June 12 
June 5 
June SO 
June 9 
May 26 
May 27 
June 10 
May 14 
May 24 
July 9 
June 12 
May IS 
June 18 
June 13 
June 24 
June 11 
June 4 
May 1 
May 5 
May 27 
June 27 
June 20 
June 12 
June 11 
May 16 
May 16 
June 9 
May 14 
May 6 
June 11 
June 16 
June 25 
June 9 
June 23 
May 20 
May 7 
June 4 
June 14 
JulyS 
June 11 
July 2 
June 19 
Juue 11 
June 11 
June 6 
May 26 
May lfi 
May 15 
June 20 
June 7 
July 2 
June 3 
June 10 
Jnne 11 
June 3 
May 24 
June 11 
April 10 
May 14 
Mav 23 
May 3 
June 4 
June 14 
-jJune 27 
July 1 



July 24 
April 3 
June 3 

Aug 11 
Aug 2 
July 15 

July 7 
Aug 8 

July 10 

June 30 

June 28 
July 15 

June 17 

June 25 

Aug. 16 
July 15 
June 14 

July 28 
July 19 
Aug 1 
July 10 

July 9 
June 9 
July 17 

June 30 
Aug 4 
July 26 
July 14 
July 16 

June 23 
June 21 
July 10 
June 28 
July 2 
July 17 

July 21 
July 26 

July 15 
July 24 
June 24 
June 14 
July 5 
Jufv 19 

Aug 11 
July U 
Aug. 6 
July 25 
July 14 
July 18 
July 7 
June 28 
J une 23 
July 6 
Jnly 19 
July 10 

Aug. 10 
July 7 
July 14 
July 21 
July 15 
June 30 
July 17 
June 27 
June 21 
July 2 
J une 5 
July 7 
Julv 28 
Aug 7 
Aug 5 



Aug. 12 

July 16 

July 15 

Sept 2 

Aug 25 

Aug. 4 

Jnly 28 

Pent 4 

July 28 

July 22 

July 18 

Aug. 5 

Aug 5 

Julv 12 

Sept. 3 

Aug. 2 

July 14 

Aug 16 

Aug. 11 

Aug 26 

July 31 

Aug. 1 

July 30 

Aug 8 

July 21 

Aug 22 

Aug 20 

Aug. 5 

Aug. i 

July 12 

Julv 14 

July 28 

July 21 

Aug. 18 

Aug. 3 

Aug. lfi , 

Aug 18 

Aug. 11 

Aug 11 

July 15 

July 12 

July 28 

Aug. 11 

Aug 30 

Ang4 

Aug. 15 

Aug K 

Aug 4 

Aug 18 

July 21 

July 22 

Julv 14 

July 15 

Aug 4 

July 28 

Ang 26 

July 28 

Aug. 4 

Aug 15 

Aug 12 

July 16 

Aug. 30 
Julv 21 
July 18 
July 21 
July 16 
July 24 
Ang31 
Aug 25 
Aug 27 



A. Noel. 
Geo, Congdon, 

R, Wegener. 

W. H. Watson, 
R. B. Noyes. 

bl. Sclmer, 
C H. Knox, 
C. PI Elliot, 
B. F. Haswell, 
Louis Franctmi, 
J. N. Webster, 
W. Hillcclass, 

J.J. Meaburn, 

S. I. C. Swezey, 
S. B. Hanson. 

H. Silvester, 

W M Helman 
P. H. Paynter, 

A. Treadwell, 

F. Madge, 

M. McDonough, 

T. P. Beach, 

T- F. Crnnlse. 

O. S. Healy. 

R Wegener, 



419CiIifornia st 

408 California st 

414 Califoruiast 

302 Montgomery st 

41l!-£ California st 

409 Battery st. 

19 First st. 

419 Califoruiast 

338 Montgomery st. 

314 California st 

506 Montgomery st 

457 8th at. Oakland. 

319 California st. 

3 Front st 

402 Montg'ry st 

Gra c s \ alley. 

401 Californic st 

Gra«s Val'ey 

411'^ California st 

Merchants' Ex 

Grass Valley. 

217 Sansome st. 

438 Callforiii» st 

Merchants' Ex 

414 Califoruiast 



W.G.Holme j , Cor. Wash. iBaticry 
W. H. Knight, 331 Mont, st 

Wm. H. Watson, 302 Montgomery at. 
H. C. Kibbe, - 419 California st. 
H. Kosminsky, 322 Sansome st. 

A. D. Carpenter. t05 Clay st 

L. Terme, 734 Montgomery st. 

J W Tripp. 408 California st 

'. H. Applegatc. 729Montgomery f l 



O. S. Healy. 
W. W. Hopkins. 

A. D. Carpenter, 
Geo. R, Spinney, 

D. M. Bokee, 
Ml V.Game. 
L. Frarjoni. 
David " ilder, 
Joseph Maguiro, 
Geo. W. R. King, 

B. B. Minor, 
('. S. Hpaly. 
C S. Weal, 

B. B. Minor, 
Jas. Mason, 
J. Jackson, 
W. L. Uslick, 
Wm. Willis. 
Sam'l Bell, 
Wm. Stuart, 
W. E.Reed, 

C. O. Tripp. 
CO. Tripp, 
L. Kaplan, 
HcuryBoyle, 
T B. Wingard, 
R. Cosner, 

E. Wheaton, 



Merchants' Ex 

41I'n California st 

605 Clay st 

320 California st. 

319 Pine st 

320 Sflnsome Bt 

314 California st 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California st 

411 Califoruiast 

4U/*£ California st 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

4Il!-i Califoruiast. 

422 California -st. 

Grass Valley. 

438 California st 

419 California s 

Eureka, Nevada 

H3Liedesd(irll'st 

Grass Valley. 

■'26 Kearny st 

526 Kearny st, 

Merchants Ex. 

Stevenson'bBldg 

318 Califoruiast 

606 Montgomery st 

401 .Montgomery st 



P. W, Van Winkle. 304 California st 



T. W. Colburn. 
H. B. Congdon, 
Geo. Davldsoni 
J. M. Knight, 
L. Franconi, 
G. S. Ladd, 
W. H. Watson, 



419 California st 
306 Montgomery st 
347 Montgomery it 
320 Montgomery st 
314 California st 
522 CalilornlaV-it 
302 Montgomery st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Xiocation. 



Name of Co. 
American FlatM. Co. 
Belmont M. Co. 
Best & Belcher M. Co. 
California Pacific R. R. Co. 
Chollar-Potosi M. Co. 
CalaveraBG. M. Co.. , . 

California Acclimatizing Society. 
Dardanelles M. Co ,_,_„., „... ,, _ 
£,liu>o Winu-rsi Plato Gold tliUM. Cu 
Eastport Coos Bay Coal M. Co. Oregon, 
r rr_i!i.„ m„„-oi * tw r.n Nevada. 



Nevada. 
Nevada. 
Washoe. 

Cal. 
Washoe. 

Col. 



Latrobe Tunnel & M. Co. 
Mammoth Grove M. Co. 
Overman M. Co. 
Pictou M. Co. 
St. Lawrence M. & M. Co 
Savage M. Co. ■ 

Tecumseh G. S. & C. M. Co. 
Trench Gold Hill M. Co. 
Union Cons. M. Co. 
Washington M. Co. 
Washington A Creole M. Co. 
Yellow Jacket S. M. Oo. 



Washoe. 

Nevada. 

Cal. 

Washoe. 

Washoe. 
Washoe. 

Ely Dist. 

Washoe. 



Secretary. 
L. Hermann, 
O. H. Bogort, 
Wm. Willis, 
E.H.Miller, Jr. 
W. E. Dean, 
T. B. Wingard, 
J. Williamson, 
J. L. King, 
J. Marks, 
J. L. Pool, 
R. N. Van Brunt, 
T. B. Wingard, 
W. W. Stetson. 
S.Phillips, 
W. i. Kip, Jr., 

E. B. Holmes, Cor. 

F. J. Herrmann, 
Jos. Marks, 

J. M. Burlington, 
T. B. Wingard. 

F. D. Clcary, 

G. W. Hopkins, 



Office in S- P. 

Virginia City. 

Express Btd'g. 

419 California at. 

41fl California st. 

418 Califoruiast 

622 Clay st, 

411 California st. 

Merchants' Ex. 

Merchants' Ex. 

Merchants' Ex 

318 Caliiornia st 

414 California st 

403 California st. 

411!b California St. 

Cal. A Sansome sts 

Cor. Clay & Kearny 

Merchants' Ex. 

Merchant's Ex. 

318 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

Gold Hill 



Meeting 1 . 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Animal 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Animal 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 



Date, 

July 28 
Julv 11 
July 14 
Aug 11 
July 14 
July 14 
July 14 
July 19 
July 21 
July 15 
Aug 2 
Julv 14 
July 10 
July 22 
Julv 14 
July 17 
July 17 
July 15 
July 21 
July 30 
July 10 
Ju(y2t 



LATEST DIVIDENDS— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



Location. 



California. 
Washoe. 

Washo.t. 

California. 

Cal. 



Name of Co. 
Black Bear Quariz M. Co. 
Black Diamond Coal Co. 
Belcher M. Co. 
Crown Point G. & S. M. Co. 
Cederberg G. M. Co. 
Con. Amador M. Co. 
Diana M. Oo. „ „ _ , 

Eureka M Co. Grass Valley, Cal. 

Eastoort Coos Bay Coal. Oregon. 

Eureka Cunsididatt-'d M. Co. Nevada. 
K. K. Consolidated M. Co. 
La Grange Ditch & Mining Co. 
Meadow Valley M. Co. Ely District. 

Mahogany G. & S. M. Co. Idaho, 

Monitor-Belmorft M. Co. Nevada. 

Providence ft A S.M. Oo. 
Raymond it Ely M. Co. Ely Dist., Nev. 



Secretary. 
W. L. Oliver, 
f*. B. Cornwall. 
H C. Kibbe, 

C. E. Elliot, 

D. M. Bokee. 
F. B. Latham. 
N. C. Fftsset. 
R. Wegener, 
J. L. Pool. 

W. W. Tiaylor. 
B. B. Minor, 
R. Abbey, 
T. W. Colburn, 

E. McFaddcn. 
B. B. Minor. 

J. M. Buffingto 
A. J Moulder 



Office in S. F. 

316 Califoruiast. 

Cor. Harri son .V Spear. 

419 Califoruiast. 

419 California St. 

420 Montgomery St 

402 Montgomery St 

220 (lay St 

414 Califoruiast 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California st. 

411'- j California St. 

312 Montgomery St. 

409 California St. 

402 Mont'gry, St, 

411)*; California St. 

i. Merchants' Ex. 

419 California St 



Amount. 


Payable 


50 


June 13 


i{. por cent 


Mar. 10 


8 00 


July 10 


4 UU 


July 12 


50c 


Feb. 6 


1 00 


Apr. 1 


1 00 


Jan . 20 


1 00 


July 9 


5U0 


Apr. 11 


1 00 


June 25 


25 


June 13 





June 12 


1 Oil 


July 15 


1 511 


Aug. , 


511 


Mar. 15 


) 00 


Nov. 11 


51K) 


Feb. 10 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



21 



Our Weekly Stock Review. 

\V Eye. -July i 
The members of tbo Stock Board having been taking 
a holiday, the Board did not convene unlll Tuesday 
Unt. Contrary to general expectations, the market watt 
dull, stale and unprofitable. Little business has been 
done during tho week and prices have been low. Th< n 
is little iiuwm of Interest from the mine*. The Behher 
has declared a dividend m( |g per share, amounting to 
$432,000 payable to-day . Last mouth It paid HO per 
share, or % 1,040,000. Crown Point pays this month only 
Mo*96ftM>00, wherMtlwt month it declared as divi- 
dends, f 1.000,000. The reason for the fall WSJ breakage 
of machinery and otber uulookod for mishaps which 

naturally decreased fno ore production. Meadow Val- 
ley peji Its usual $1 per share or $60,000. Eureka, 
(tira&s Valley) pays $1 per share, aggregating $20,000. 
The Raymond it Ely iutu>- has again passed it* dive lend. 
I oiU-rgrouuil war) In the mine has been suspended for 
the present until the ixt.'ii^iM- hurfj.. repairs aud al- 
terations iu contemplation and under way are oompl ted. 
An immense amount of machinery for the uiiuo U on 
the way there. The Crown Point carries" over to next 
month*! account 1100,000. 

The OoUBtOQka this Week have been Very dull, little 

business being d ■ in tin m, and prices declining, On 

Wednesday the whole list broke down, and at close Bel- 
cher was $1.60 lower; Bait. Con., ft; Chollar, $5; Gould 
A: Curry, 11; Hiilu & Nor.rosa, $0; Ophlr, $4; Overman, 
to; Savage, $J0; Beg, Belcher, $8; Jacket, $4. The de- 
cline in Savage was the feature of the day, 

To-day the market looked up a little, and prices 
advanced to Rome extent. The iiu. tuatious, however, 
were slight. 

The following items of interest from prominent mines 
are collated from letters or telegrams from superin- 
tendents on tile at t he oillccs of tho respective companies 
in this city. 

Belcher. 

Dispatch of the 8th says south crosscut, 1200-foot lovol 
(30.» feet south of the line) shows aome oro in face. No 
Change ui 1100-foOl leval crosscut. South face, sill lloor, im- 
proves. South drift in fine ore. General progress of mine 
very fine. Car ".uuples, $82. 

Dispatch of the Wth sa> a the south crosscut, 1200-foot level, 
Bhowesome splendid ore. The crosscut on the 1300-fooJ 
fvl remains unchanged. South drift, 1300-foot level, still in 
splendid ore. Assay $78 per ton. 

Buckeye. 

Letter of the 7th nays have no change to report from com- 
pany's mine. Shipped to-day one bar of bullion valued at 
$1,196.88. Oro slips for the 3d Hi tons 650 pounds. 
Crown Point. 

Dispatch of the 8th says that on the 1400-foot level cross- 
cut Miij have about two-tlnrds as much water as they can 
bandit. 1 . Winze <<~. the lLl'c-ii.ol level is in fine ore. und if 
the first wall keeps its present course it will bo about thirty 
feel fat to the east wall. In the crosscut from the sill 
Hour they started a winze from the 1300-foot level on the 
east wall and about 275 foot in a direct line north of the 
Belcher. The winze is down fonr feet, in $100 ore. No 
change elsewhere. 

Dispatch of the 9th says we have three drill holes in face 
of 1400-foot level crosscut, 17 feet deep, and also another in 13 
feet. Will run it 20 feet in if necessary. Think thiB hole will 
givejus all the water we can pump. Have made no progress 
in sill tloor crosscut, WOO-feot level, since last report. No 
change elsewhere. 

Chollar-Potosi. 

Letter of the 8th says during the twenty-four hours end- 
ing morning, 123 tons of ore were taken from the mine, und 
and 60 tons, 100 pounds forwarded to mill. Work at all 
points of the mine is fully resumed. Water supply as 
pumped from the shaft is adequate for steam making 
purposes, also for fire, should any occur. East crosscut on 
fourth station, has some quartz showing some metal. 
Nothing important at this writing. 

Caledonia. 

Letter of the 8th says the face of the main drift at the 
second station is now exceedingly hard blasting rock- 
Has touched the south drift. There is nothing new tore- 
port, the ground still continuing tough, and the work is of 
course slow. 

Equitable Tunnel. 

Letter of the 4th says there ia no special change in the ap- 
pearance of the rock in this tunnel, streaks still continue, 
and the rock looks as favorable for ore still as at any time 
since work was commenced, und we feel confident, from in- 
dications, that we are in the vicinity of ore. The appear- 
ance of the rock is precisely the same as it was before the 
vein was struck. Work will be got on more rapidly the 
coming week, as no one was working this week. It will be 
run night and day in this until contract is finished. 
Gould & Curry- 

Letter of the 5th says the pumps are rapidly reducing the 
water, accumulated during the stoppage, on the 1600-foot 
level. The air gallery connected with the Savage mine is 
nearly timbered. The passage of air currents through this 
connection is rapidly reducing the temperature of the var- 
ious parts of the mine. From this point we have started a 
crosscut to the east at a point 100 feet distant from the 
southern boundary. On the tenth, or 1500-foot level, we are' 
still advancing with the northeast drift, on hard material. 
On the second level we are extracting a few tons of ore of a 
paying quality dally. 

Lady Esten Tunnel. 
Letter of the -lth_ inst. says the contract closed on the 
tunnel on the 3d. The entire length of the tunnel is 3G0 
feet. From breast to surface, 155 feet. The rook for the 
last twenty feet has not boen very encouraging, rather bar- 
ren, not mineral rook. A ohange is evidently taking place, 
spar and lime coming in on the right, and looks decidedly 
more favorable. The air pipes will have to be put in before 
the tunnel is driven any farther. Have concluded to start 
a drift on the vein of pyrites of iron and peacock copper, 
and test it, but shall not go far unless it improves. 

Ohio Con. G. II. Co. 

Letter from the Superintendent under date of the 7th 
says that the chimney in south drift has been proved for 18 
feet in length thus far, it has narrowed down, but indica- 
tions are that it will soon widen again, the chimney has 
only been worked for 60 feet in depth, from the top in old 
works, which leaves a body of ore of 100 feet overhead to 
stope out, which will mill $50 per ton. The cross drift to the 
east vein still continues very hard; only able to make one 
foot in 21 hours it is expected, however, that the lode will 
be reacbod during the present week. The second clean-up 
from the mill will be made by Monday, which will give the 
result of 100 tons in full. 

Page & Panaca. 

The work is progressing favorably and as fast as possible 
with no new developements. 



iIning -Summary. 



Th* following la mostly condensed from Journals pub 
failed tn the iutvrior.in proximity to the mines mi 



California. 



AMADOR COUNTY. 

Otis Mim:.- Amador JHtpaiA, July 5; Wi w 1 
a wry rlob piece of gouts which had jiiht boen taken 
out ol tins mine new tin* place, now bains prospected 
ta Mr. Pierre David, The piece would probably m Igh 

lit. rally Btnddi & « Itfa 
sulphurets, Ifllonrperied with numerous particles of 
free gold. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Ohio Consolidated.— This mine, located one mile 
east of VY. rt 1'oiut. Dhows tangible symptoms of a valu- 
abb- mine. The property consists of two purallei 
veins some lnij it. apart. The main shaft, on the west 
vein, la 100 fe. tin depth, at tbo bottom of which, levels 
Hiv 1,. inj mo north and south. A transverse drift is 
ulmi driving towards the east vein which tbo Superin- 
tendent expects to tap In a few days. About 50 tons of 

ore were crushed s>t Harris' mill, which yielded over 
in. The mill la running again 00 similar ore 

from the same slope. Judicious management of the 
mine gained a victory Ln spite of adverse circumstances, 
and tbo present Superintendent should receive the 
praise he hue merited. 

Di'iiYi: \ IIvDiurLic Claim. — Calaveras Chronicle, 
June 5; WOfk Ls Imlng pressed forward energetically In 
the miue with the most satisfactory results. Acres upon 
acres of the ridge— Che gravel being over 100 ft. deep, 
having been wuBhed away, and still scarcely a com- 
mencement has been made towards working out tho 
claim. 300 inches of water are constantly used, and 
the mine is fully supplied with all tho modern appli- 
ances for working to advantage. A monster derrick has 
recently been erected for removing tho cement lately 
uncovered, and the tuaehiuery works as well as could be 
wished. Tbo mast Is sixty feet in height and the boom 
fifty feet in length, both being massive timbers capable 
of sustaining almost any weight. The derrick is oper- 
ated by means of two hurdy-gurdy water wheels, on the 
Bame shaft so constructed as to permit of reversible 
motion. The derrick greatly facilitates operations by 
removing the rockB from tho mine rapidly und with but 
little expense, allowing tho hydraulic unobstructed 
play upon tho bank of gravel. A short time since a blast, 
composed of 11 kegs of powder, wns exploded under a 
point of the bank that was so hard as to bo ' "piped" with 
dlificulty. Two tunnelB were run in a considerable dis- 
tance and transverse dt if ts dug accross their inner ex- 
tremities ln which the powder was placed. The blast 
did good execution, shattering the bank and loosening 
tho gravel for a considerable distance. The Duryoa 
claim lathe most extensive and profitable in the county. 

Brown & Coooins have run an incline 200 ft. in 
length, to the bottom of the tunnol. The claim is on 
tho famouB Tunnel ridge lead, which has paid continu- 
ously for miles. The channel has but recently been 
reached and the work of getting tho claim in shape for 
profitable working Is jnst completed. The gravel taken 
out pays handsomely, and we feel certain that tho mino 
will shortly rank among tho first in tho district. The 
gravel is brought up "out of the depths" in cars drawn 
by mules. 

Brackett k Co. — This mine is an old one, from which 
thousunds of dollars have been extracted, but a new 
tunnel bus lately been run for the purpose of tapping 
the channel higher up the ridge. The tunnel is 400 ft. 
in length, the greater portion ol the distance through 
solid bedrock, straight us on arrow and one of the hand- 
somest pieceB of work of the kind we ever saw. The 
channel is just reached and the gravel looks excellently 
well. No washing has yet been done but the claim is 
kuown to be n good one beyond a peradventure. A bat- 
tery Is to be erected, for the purpose of crushing the 
gravel, as soon us the new diggings are fairly opened. 

Simpson, Veith & Shear.— This Is one of the most 
extensive and promising claims in the county; 300 
inches of water, with a pressure of 200 ft., are brought 
to the mine in a 11-inch iron pipe and projected against 
the bank with prodigiouB force. The claim is one of 
the beBt fitted-up of any we ever saw, all the appliances 
connected with it being first-class. The company own 
a large area of ground, and the washing, solar, has paid 
beyond the most sanguine expectations, The bank iB 
about 80 ft. in height, and contains gold from the bed- 
rock to grass roots. 

Moser & Howabth. — The work that has been accom- 
plished by these gentlemen is truly surprising. When 
they commenced operations, about two years since, the 
entire gulch was filled with tailings from the mines in 
the ridges on either side, to the height of from 40 to 75 
ft. The debris has been washed away down to the bed- 
rock, for a considerable distance, thousands of inches 
of water being at times employed in the work. The 
water was collected in reBervoirs at the head of the 
gulch, and when filled the flood-gates were hoisted, the 
deluge sweeping the tailings with irresistible force 
down the ravine. The gold settled to the bottom of 
the gulch, and now the auriferous gravel is being shov- 
eled into sluices. 'We learn that the claim is paying 
splendidly. From six pans of gravel $300 were obtained. 
A clean-up is to be made shortly, when we look for a 
larger yield, in proportion to the quantity of gravel 
washed, than ever obtained in this vicinity. 

NEVADA COUNTY- 

Manzantta Claims. — Transcript, July 1: The Man- 
zanita Mining Co. made their first clean up for the sea- 
son yesterday. The result was._641 ounces of gold, and 
the yield has been excellent./ There is yet a large 
amount of work to do fitting up the new and lower tun- 
nel, which it is expected will he ready for mining by 
the beginning of next season. The new tunnel iB much 
lower than the present working point, and will enable 
the company to work to better advantage. 
- Rich Strike. — Nevada "Transcript," July2 TheGold 
Run Mining Company, on Gold Flat, have made a rich 
strike. A few days ago they cut the ledge, which is a 
foot and a half thick, and it is estimated the rock will 
pay from $60 to $80 per ton.". In a day or two they will 
commence drifting on the ledge from the old works, 
which were lost some years ago. Having struck the 
rich Bhute they will soon be getting out good pay. The 
prospect of this Co. is highly encouraging. 
. Cedar Quartz Mine.— Placer Herald, July 5: Owned 
by Mr. James Nickerson, located on Wolf Creek, about 
two miles north of Gautier's Toll House, on Bear River, 
is proving to be one of the most important in the State. 
The ledge is some 30 ft. in width; is full of sulphurets, 
which yield gold, silver and copper. Its course iB 
northeasterly and southwesterly, the entire length of 
which is 4,600 It., following along and through the bed 
of Wolf Creek for 1,400 ft., at which point an abrupt 
turn of the creek is made, and the ledge pursues its 
course through a high and precipitous bluff, but show- 
ing its croppings the remainder of the distance. Two 
shafts are sunk at the foot of the bluff, and a tunnel 130 
It. in length, at a depth of 40 ft., 1b drifted along the 
course of the ledge. The rock is looking well and 
shows minute specks of free gold. Samuel Bethell, U. 
S. Deputy Mineral Surveyor, has just completed the 
final survey for patent, and likewise made surveys for a 
water ditch He finds that at a distance of one-half mile 
from mill site a fall of 40 ft. can be obtained on Wolf 
Creek and an excellent point for a dam secured, together 
with plenty of tree water, thus securing force to drive a 
40-ft. over-shot wheel at comparatively small expense, 
A gang of men {Borne Chinese) are grading a road from 
the old Grass Valley Toll Road, a distance of some 2 
mileB, to the mine, A new dwelling-house, boarding- 
house, blacksmith-shop, stabling, etc., are nearly com- 
pleted, and appearances indicate that work in earnest is 



ed, and a full development ol this pi 

tdgfi UDOdwin, late ol Nevada, 

has recently purchased an interest "f Mr. Xickersou. 

Cniuun i'HKKK,- White Pine An"-, June 28: (.ieorgo 

W.Doano has returned from a trip to Cherry Creek and 

v ien.it;, . 1. .i >. .me t-p. , 111:1 n- l'ouud by 

him in that locality. Wo have no hesitation In pro* 
oonnolng nub rock as we saw, the riches! that auy sec- 
tion ever prodtti tllsxitv in general appear- 

ime. to that (bund In the Comstock, leads us to the be- 
lief that a rich camp has been discovered. The pres- 
ence of partlcleB of pure gold and silver, in dltlvreiil 
of rook, proves its rionnoss, and the quart 
formation Id which it ts embedded, adds additional proof 

lent and permanent value. He says that aB 

great many miners, prospectors and speculators are 

dally making their appearance in tho new camp, and all 
express unbounded talth In its future. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

Tut: Bxcbxsxob. — Tuolumne /ndepmdenl, Ju y5: Last 
week cleaned uji out of 20 tons of ore. 82 }j ounces melt- 
ed gold— which will net about $1,200. 

Water has failed at tuo Spring Gulch Mine, aud the 
ohanoea for morejus slim until the rain* set In. 

Tho miners at Cherokee have plenty of water since tho 
farmers ln the hills have stopped irrigating their clover. 

funck ft: Co., Cherokee, from a run of eight days, 
(cruahiug JO tons of rock in their five Btamp mill,) 
brought into eanjp, on Monday, 54 ounces of gold. 

Cordova. — Tho prospects ln this mine are good. 
Frank Prudhomuie, the owner, has soul, an air bhaft 
from tho top to the tuunol. SVill probably crush u 
small batch of rock next week. 

New Mu.l.— The Gulden Gate Quartz Co. have con- 
tracted for a new ton stamp mill. The Seeber Bros, 
have the contract for building, Bradford .'v. Way; the 
lumber; und Phelps, Shepard At Cowle, of the tionora 
Foundry, the machinery. Excavation lor a foundation 
has already been commencod. 

The claim just north of Capt. Eakin's, at Columbia, 
still holds good, and is paying $6 per day to tho hand, 
although worked in the primitive manner peculiar to 
Chinamen. The i>lucc vvas formerly the gurden ol John 
Alexander, who sold tho ground to the Chinamen for 
$550. They have already taken out several thousands 
of dollars, and to-day tho mine is worth hundreds 
more than was originally paid fur it. 

Rich Claim. — Some very rich dirt is now being 
taken out uf Capt. iiakin's claim, in tho old reservoir, 
Columbia, Several pieces of from 7Cc, to $1 bave been 
picked out of the bank of earth they are washing, and 
the prospects are that the pay-gravel will run deep. A 
company of Chluumcn are very unxlous to purchase the 
claim, und huve offered $4,000; but the Captain's price 
is $U,000, exclusive of tho pipe and llunio. The proba- 
bility Is that the Celestials will finally raise the cash 
aud close the bargain, as they are now in correspond- 
ence with parties below. 

Pattkhson Mill and Mine. — After three weeks' run 
with his new twenty-stamp mill, Mr. Hughes haB 
cleaned-up. The result is moBt gratifying. It has ex- 
ceeded tho most sanguine expectations. The rock 
crushed was not selected, and the gold bricks produced 
are convincing proof that this mine aud mill will take a 
high rank among the gold-producing institutions of the 
county. The sulphurets, which yield a large assay, are 
collected in large tanks, and Mr. Hughes intends to 
erect apparatus to work them, and thus add to the mag- 
nificent returns which he is already receiving. 

Wonder. — Quartz vein, on Fox Gulch, west of Colum- 
bia, owned by D.H, Crocker & Co., is proving true to itB 
name. The rock proBpects splendidly, showing free 
gold in every piece, and the casing is also exceedingly 
rich. The vein, including casing, is 2}$ ft. wide, and 
in the tuunel just started gives every indication of in- 
creasing. Mr. Knight, an expert from below, visited the 
mine on Friday of last week, and expressed himself 
well autisfled with tbo prospect. 

Good Rook. — Twenty-eight tons of rock taken from 
the Horse Thief mine near JeBus Maria, lately paid 
S700— an average of $25 per ton. The quartz was 
crushed in the orastra connected with the mine. We 
learn that the lead is developing well and that the pros- 
pects of the mine are very flattering. 

Nevada. 

BRISTOL- 

Heboules. — Work during the week has been princi- 
pally of a nature preparatory to operations on a larger 
scale than heretofore. 

Sultan, — The ledge has widened in sinking during 
the past week, and is now fully 10 ft. wide, showing 
throughout its width ore of fully as good an average 
quality as previously. 

ELY. 

Alps. — Pioche Uecora, June 29: Work is being rapidly 
prosecuted on the lower drift from the main .shaft, 
which is now in about 250 ft. It is expected the ledge 
will be struck at about the distance of 280 ft. From the 
stopes and drifts on the 164-ft, level the same quality of 
ore is being extracted. About two tons of first-class ore 
is being raised dally. 

Peavine. — No material change to note. The ore 
throughout the mine is fully equal in quality and quan- 
tity to the developments of the past few weeks. 

Raymond and Ely.— Underground work has been sus- 
pended for the time being, until the extensive surface 
repairs and alterations in contemplation and under way 
are completed. An Immense amount of new machinery 
for this mine is now en route from Palisade to this 
place. 

South Side. — This location— a home imcorporation — 
is situated just above the crest of the mountain, some 
450 ft. beyond the water tank. The shaft was started in 
hard blue limestone, and has now attained a depth of 
100 ft. At about 75 ft. the character of the limestone 
changed, and is heavily stained with mineral. 

American Flag.— Shiftingthe main shaft, and crowd- 
ing the work with all possible dispatch. Shipping ore 
constantly to the mill, which is running on full time . 

Paodtio Tunnel. — A contract of 100 ft. has just been 
completed, making the extreme length of the tunnel 
1263 ft. A new contract for from 100 to 200 ft. will be 
let to-morrow. Indications of the close proximity of a 
main ledge are unmistakable. For some distancepast, 
bunches of ore have heen cut in the tunnel, some of 
which assayed very high. 

Havana.— Shaft 320 ft. deep; vein 9 ft. wide; all ore. 
About 10 incheB from the foot-wall is a streak of ore 
30 inches thick aud of extraordinary richneBB. 

Esoelsi or. —Still drifting from the new shaft at a 
depth of 180 ft. to make the connection with the old 
workings. As soon as this is accomplished, ore will 
again begin to come to the Burface. 

Bowery. — A great change for the better is noticeable 
in this mine. Everywhere throughout the stopes an 
improvement is visible. There are now about 50 tons 
of magnificent ore on the dump, equal if not superior 
to the rich ores that made the name of the Bowery fa- 
mous in the past history of Ely District. Expect to 
commence crushing again on the 1st proximo, or as 
shortly thereafter aB the mill can work for them. 

Pioche. — Working the usual number of hands and 
raising about five tons of ore per day. Expect to re- 
sume crushing on or about the first of July. 

Chief op the Hill. — Have completed the raise from 
the 150-ft. level, Wright's shaft, and drifted 20 feet from 
the top of theraise, the diift Bhowing a little ore all 
the way. The Wright shaft is now thoroughly timbered 
from top to bottom for the distance of 210 feet below 
the level of the tunnel, and sinking is now going on 
night and day. Taking out ore all the time; 40 tons on 
the dump. The stopes appear to be improving as they 
are raised upon. 

SilvebPeak.— The grading is completed for the re- 
ception of the machinery now on the way, This ma- 
chinery, consisting ol one 8x16 engine, with all the 
modern appliances and improvements that can make 
the works a success, has been beard from en route, and 
may be expected to arrive about the 2d proximo. The 
incline is being put in thorough order, and is being 



Koli.lly tinilVrcd — preparatory to permanent and ex- 
tensive work. Pending these changes, however, the 
raising of ore. Is, for the lime b»iug, nescessurilv sur- 
panded. 

OmoiNAL Dkxter.— Drifting both ways from bottom 
01 incline. Phuty of good ore In sight. 

Meadow Vauj-:v.- Pioebe Ktcortt, July 5: No change 
to note. Shipped $150,000 this month. 

MaZEPPA,— The hoisting works have been completed; 
steam was raised on Monday the i!:id, and sinking the 
main shuft resumed. 

Original Dexter.— Plocho Record, July 6: Still run- 
ning drifts in ore. In tho south drift the vein is fully 
3 it. wide, and In the drift to the north it is over 4 ft. 
There uro about GO tons of rock on the dump— some of 
ii very high grade. We recognised considerable oro 
that was tho exact counterpart of the rich, dark-eol- 
ored ore that first gave the Alps mino tho prominence 
it haB since so well maintained, 

Pioche PiiENix.— Mr. Nelson has recently been ap- 
jM.iuteii Superintendent of this mine, vice Captain 
Hardy, resigned, and work, which lor a long time was 
suspended, has been resumed. 

Chapman Mill and Mining Co.— Running a drift for 
the ledge from the 420 ft. level with favorable Indica- 
tions. The rock in tho face is now deeply stained with 
mineral, and in all probability It will not be long be- 
fore tho ledge [Breached. 

Louibe. — Drifting on a narrow seam of ore, cut last 
week ln tho 200-ft. level. The ore is a rich chloride, 
asBays going over $200 to the ton. It is believed that 
this will lead to alarge body of ore. 

Vultuhe,— Shaft between 85 and 90 ft. deep. More 
ore is coming in, and tho general prospect may be said 
to be exceedingly good. 

Caroline. — Captain Hardy, Superintendent of this 
mine, goes to the Bay in a few dayB, to be absent about 
two weeks, and on hie return work will be resumed on a 
larger scale. 

Alps. — Tho face of the drift running from the ledge 
at the lowest level is now in hard white quartzlte, and 
expect to strike the ledge very shortly. Elsewhere no 
important change to record. 

Pioc a e.— Working the name number of hands as last 
week, and extracting about the same daily average of 
ore. 

Sdlver Peak.— Tho machinery for the new hoisting 
works is now on the ground, aud will bo put in position 
with all possible dispatch. 

Excelsior.— Nothing new to noto. Drifting from the 
new shaft continues. 

La Paz.— Sinking the winze on the ledge and taking 
out Borne excellent ore, 

Peavine.— Working lull force, and piling up good ore 
on the dump. 

Spring Mount.— Pioche Iieccrd, July C: This Go. is 
sinking to strike the Spring Mount lode, which is un- 
doubtedly identical with the famous Burke ledge. In 
the upper works they struck 3 very large and well- 
defined ledges, but the ore was not considered rich 
enough to pay for working at present. The main shaft 
is down 350 ft., and is being driven night and day with 
three shifts of handB. 

South Sdje.— Sinking the shaft, and averaging one 
foot to the shift. 

Portland. — Working the usual number of men and 
raising ore all the time. 

Bowery. — The rich ore noticed in our last still con- 
tinues, with good promise for the future. 

Raymond and Ely. — Ab noticed in our last Review, 
underground work has been suspended lor a while, 
pending the orection of the now hoisting works. Part 
of the machinery arrived during tho week. 

Meadow Valley.— No ore is being raised at present 
through tho shafts on No. 7 and No. 5— everything com- 
ing through the No. 3 shaft— though in point of fact it 
hardly deserves the name, when taken in connection 
with such a mine as the Meadow Valley, being small 
and crooked. In Bize it is only 5x6 feet, and of this only 
two feet nine inches is devoted to the bucket, which is 
necessarily small in order to raise the requsite amount 
of ore to the surf ace to run themill, The lnck of carrying 
capacity has to be made up by a speed of 800 feet a min- 
ute. The wear and tear is tremendous, so that the same 
kind of rope that was formerly used three months, now 
only lasts 24,or at most 28 days. As soon as a connection is 
made with No. 5, where are the main hoisting works of 
the company, everything above and including the 7th 
level, will bo worked through that shaft. This con- 
nection will certainly be made by the 1st proximo, by 
which time it is expected that the new works on No. 3 
will be completed. The new engine haB a 12 inch cylin- 
der, and is rated at 40-horse power. It was made at the 
Risdon Iron Works, San Francisco. Thirty-six tons of 
ore are now being raised daily, notwithstanding the difi- 
culties to which we have alluded, and it is certainly 
fully as rich as any we have ever seen lrom the mine. 
The bullion Bhipment for June was in the neighbor- 
hood of $135,00C. 

Highland.— Hamburgh.— The vein in the shaft Is 
gradually widening and is now a good three feet. On 
Thursday last, in the bottom of the shaft there was 
struck a narrow streak of a white and blue decomposed 
ore that assayed SUM to the ton. They will commence 
crushing ore from the Hamburgh at the Mendha mill 
about the first of August. 

Georgia.— Driving ahead on the tunnel Ledge 
looks well. 

Mendha Mine and Mill.— The mine looks well 
throughout and the mill is running steadily on its ores, 
with very satisfactory resultB. 

Othello.— Tunnel in on the ledge 60 ft., and shaft 
sunk at the end of the tunnel on the ledge about 12 ft. 
The vein is from 2 to 4 ft. wide, mostly galena ore, car- 
rying a high percentage of silver. An average of thirty 
assays made by Mr. John Cahill gave a little over $180 
to the ton. Notwithstanding the presence of galena, 
the maBS of ore has been found to be of a good milling 
quality. Work on this mine, which has been for Borne 
time suspended, will be resumed next week. 

Chief or the Hill.— In the drift at the head of the 
raise from the 160 ft. level from the Wright shaft, have 
made 23 ft. during the past week, and expect to make 
the connection with the works of the Chief East, in 
about a week more — sinking all the time. Working the 
usual number of hands, and taking out ore steadily. 
About 50 tons of ore on the dump. Mr. Cook, the fore- 
man, showed us a specimen that to our minds cannnot 
be beat in the camp. We have seen all the beautiful 
specimens in the show windows and cabineta in town, 
but nothing finer than this; and what makes it more 
gratifying iB the fact that there is plenty of it. 

WASHOE. 

Utah.— Gold Hill News, Jnly 5: Sinking in the new 
shaft of the Utah mine will be resumed on Monday 
next. 

Julia.— In the Julia the east drift at the 800-ft. level 
is being driven ahead, and at the 1000-ft. level the south 
drift is running alongside the ledge. 

Senator. — The shaft of the Senator is down 375 ft., in 
the same encouraging character of vein matter as last 
reported. 

Mint. — The upper tunnel of the Mint is in 150 ft,, 
with two crosscuts into the ledge, showing very favor- 
able-looking ore, and the Jacob Little has developed a 
good body of ore in the second crosscut. 

Imperial.— The Imperial turns out about 80 tons 
daily from the lower levels. Drifting both north and 
south at the 1400 and 1500-f t levels of the Yellow Jacket 
developes only excellent indications as yet. 

Crown Podnt. — The Crown Point machinery is run- 
ning all right, and the daily yield of the mine has in- 
creased to over 400 tons. In crosscutting for the ore 
vein, at the 1400-ft. level, the drill is kept running in 
ahead as a precautionary measure, guarding against a 
great rush of water. 

Beloher.— The Belcher is yielding over 500 tons per 
day. The 1300-ft. level continues to show improve- 
ment and the face of the main drift south is all in first- 
class ore. The main incline is now down below the 
(Con tinned on Pagre 28.) 



22 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS, 



[juiy 12 1873. 



Largest Grape-Vine in the World. 



A Revolution 



California is noted for its "big things" the 
world over, and "we to the manor born" have, 
in consequence, to be more careful in our as- 
sertions than those of other climes. But even 
while the average Calif ornian feels not the 
slightest prickings of conscience when recount- 
ing the beauties of his Golden State, people 
who have never crossed the continent are apt 
to make some allowance for the exaggeration 
which custom has long permitted travelers to 
indulge in. We have the largest mines, the 
largest valleys, the largest farms — but why 
recount the many natural peculiarities of our 
thrice-favored clime, which are so well known 
to all of us on the shores of the Pacific, though 
but half believed in away from the sound of its 
waters? One thing, however — the pride of the 
"lower country" has so obtruded itself upon 
public notice, that its claims to notoriety are 
universally conceded. We refer to the Santa 
Barbara Grape-vine, a representation of which 
is given on this page. 

Most natural curiosities and localities of note 
have connected with them some little bit of 
romance, whichlends an additional charm to the 
quiet of a ruined church or tower, and softens ' new product, 
the rugged weather-beat- 
en sides of rocky heights, 
or lightens up a gloomy 
chasm as Bparkling forth 
do the dark waters of a 
mountain stream. So it 
is with this California 
wonder. We are told — 
no matter by whom ; such 
things should not be 
traced too rudely — that a 
Spanish lady, when 
starting from Sonora on 
horseback, had given to 
her by her lover, a 

branch from a grape- 
vine, to be used as a 

riding-whip. She must 

have cherished this as a 

memento aside from its 

usefulness, for when she 

arrived at Santa Barbara, 

after her long journey, 

she planted the branch, 

which has since grown 

into notoriety as the 

laigest grape-vine in the 

world. How long ago it 

was planted is somewhat 

uncertain. Some say the 

Spanish lady came here 

before the beginning of 

the present century. 

Others say the vine is 40 

years old, and still others 

say 48 years. Like many 

other things, even of 

recent origin, the dates 

in connection with it are 

uncertain — though the 

grapes are not. 
This famous vine is 

situated about three miles 

and a half from the town 

of Santa Barbara, in the 

court-yard of an old 

adobe house. The trunk 

is four feet four inches in 

the largest part. It be- 
gins to branch out at 

about six or eight feet 

from the ground, and is then supported on 

framework, which it covers as a roof, as 

shown in our illustration. The whole vine, 

supported on the framework, now covers 

over an acre of ground. Several of the limbs 

are as much as ten inches in circumference at 

a distance of 25 or 30 feet from the trunk. 

The annual yield of grapes from this mammoth 

vine is from 10,000 to 12,000 pounds. The 

clusters of grapes average, when ripe, from 

two to two and a half pounds each. The vine 

is on rather high ground, and it is stated that 

the ground about it has never been manured at 

all. The soil under it is hard, and the Span- 
iards dance under the shadow of the leaves of 

the vine, which form a completely sun-proof 

covering of living verdure. This vine by its 

product supported the old woman who owned 

it for many years. Another vine, near by, bids 

fair to rival the " father of all vines," the fruit 

from it rather excelling that of the "big vine." 

A small stream of water runs near both vines, 

which probably helps their growth.— Ml. Press. 

Mixing Colors.— When different colors are 
mixed together, the resultisnotthedestruetion of 
any of the coloring elements, northeirchemical 
combination. The microscope shows that the 
particles of each of the colors entering into the 
mixture remain entirely separate and un- 
changed. 



ia the 
Butter. 



Production of 



Statements have been widely published de- 
scribing the method of manufacturing so-called 
butter from animal fat, as it has been carried 
on in Prance. The New York Sun gives an ac- 
count of what is now being done in New York. 
It is to be presumed that there will be 
considerable room left for the old-fashioned 
kind of butter for some time to come, and at 
prices that will justify making. We copy as 
follows: 

A company has been organized in this city, 
with a capital of $500,000, for the manufacture 
of butter. It is claimed that the butter is gen- 
uine, the means of producing it being alone 
artificial; in other words, the discoverer affirms 
that the article is not merely butyrous, but in 
every respect the complete and perfect thing, 
as agreeable, nutritious, and usable as the best 
Orange county butter. A gentleman of recog- 
nized ability as a chemist is the fortunate in- 
troducer of this new wonder. Several persons 
of wealth have bought stock, and in a week or 
two the manufacture will be conducted on a 
very large scale. The temporary offices of the 
Oleo-Margarine Manufacturing Co., as the 
corporation is called, are at 40 Broadway, and 
their manufactory at Forty-fifth street. Ar- 
rangements have been made for securing better 
accommodations in Fiftieth street, and very 
soon the market will be fully supplied with the 
At present the demand for the 



appearance it is precisely similar to the finest 
country butter, made from the milk of live 
cows. Several of the leading men in the but- 
ter trade have purchased stock, as have also 
many of the steamship lines and the propri- 
etors of the leading city hotels. Prof. E. 
Ogden Doremus has testified to the success of 
the new method of butter manufacture, and 
prophesies great prosperity for the new corpo- 
ration. Prof. Paraf, the discoverer, expects 
that the new product will drive live cow butter 
out of the market altogether. The few un- 
scientific outsiders who are acquainted with 
the facts now first made public, regard the 
whole thing with amazement. It seems ex- 
tremely odd to them that the same carcass 
which furnishes a fresh steak for breakfast 
should also supply the Orange county butter 
which they spread upon their accompanying 
hot rolls. 

Admitting all that is stated in the foregoing 
to be true, as regards the process of manufac- 
ture and quality of the product, yet we fail to 
perceive the immense advantage claimed for 
the new process. To get at the "butter mat- 
ter," as it is called, the animal must needs be 
killed; which seems very much like "killing 
the goose that laid the golden eggs;" and yet 
the number of animals necessarily slaughtered 
for beef, would undoubtedly afford a consider- 
able supply. 

All of this suet supply is not in the posses - 




THE SANTA BARBARA GKAPE-VINE. 



Fidelity, good-humor, and complacency of 
temper, outlive all the charms of a fine face, 
and make its decay invisible. 



article is so great that it is beyond the capacity 
of the company to supply it. The profits are 
expected to be over 100 per cent. 

Fashionable Hotel Butter. 

As this city-made Orange county butter iB 
used in many of the most fashionable hotels 
and restaurants, both for cooking and for the 
table, it may be interesting to the readers of 
The Sun to learn something of the method in 
which it is made. In the first place agents are 
employed to visit the slaughter houses and to 
buy up all the beef fat usually styled suet. 
This suet is carted to the butter factory and 
cleansed. Then it is put into ordinary meat 
choppers and minced fine. It is afterward 
placed in a boiler with as much water in bulk 
as itself. A steam pipe is introduced among 
the particles of the suet and they are melted. 
The refuse or membrane goes to the bottom of 
the water, the oily substance floats and is re- 
moved. This latter consists of butter matter 
and stearine. A temperature of 80 degrees 
melts the former and leaves the stearine at the 
bottom. The butter matter, or cream, is drawn 
off; then about thirteen per cent, of fresh milk 
is added and the necessary salt, and the whole 
is churned for ten or fifteen minutes. The re- 
sult is Orange county butter at about one-half 
the usual cost. 

The stearine is sold at twelve cents a pound 
to the candle maker, and the refuse at seven 
cents a pound to the manufacturer of food for 
cattle. 

Butter for Summer Tourists. 

All the leading steamship lines between here 
and Europe are to be supplied this Summer 
with this newly invented butter. In taste and 



sion of the new style butter makers; they will | 
have to buy their stock from the butchers; and 
how long would it be after it was known that 
these patent butter makers were making a 
profit of "100 per cent." on cost of the suet, 
before the butchers would put up the price of 
the same. So we will rest easy, believing that 
California made butter, by the old process, 
will not wholly go out of fashion, in any event, 
not before we can dispose of our State's consid- 
erable stock of cows. 



New Lake. — The Ventura Signal has the fol- 
lowing: Some distance up the San Buenaven- 
tura river, on the Saxby & Gilbert ranch, there 
is a beautiful little lake in the mountains, pro- 
bably 500 feet above the sea, which has been 
recently formed by the sliding down of an im- 
mense backbone of earth and rocks, entirely 
closing the place of egress to the water, which, 
in the Winter comes pouring down the baran- 
cas and mountain sides. The lake affords a 
plentiful supply of fresh water for any number 
of cattle and sheep, and is clear and cool. 
The trees which stood in the bottom of the ra- 
vine are now almost lost sight of in the water, 
their dead tops only being visible above the 
surface. 



The Colorado Desert. — A thorough and 
complete survey of the Colorado Desert, east 
of San Diego, with a view of ascertaining the 
practicability of turning the Colorado river 
into the Desert, and thus reclaiming vast tracts 
of land, is to be made by Mr. J. E. James. 
He is said to be backed by heavy capitalists. 



Erroneous Wheat Estimate. 

In our recent June 28th number, we gave a 
tabular statement copied from the Sacramento 
Record, that now appears to us to be wrong 
somewhere. That statement put the total 
yield of wheat for 1872, at 12,701,000 centals. 
Now the commercial records of the port of 
San Francisco show, that over 11,000,000 of 
centals of the crop of 1872 have already been 
shipped to foreign ports; whilst the quantity 
required for seed and the year's consumption 
could not have been less than 4,500,000 cen- 
tals; which added to the 500,000 centals of the 
old crop now on hand, would carry the yield 
of 1872 altogether above the Record's estimate 
of 12,701,000 centals as the total yield. Will 
the Record set us right in the matter, and show 
us upon what it bases its estimate for an in- 
creased yield the present year over that of the 
last. 

We think it a mistake of that portion of the 
press of the State, which over-estimates the 
probable yield. It is doing the farmers an in- 
jury; for with every statement, up goes the 
price of sacks one or two cents or more. As 
long as it was believed that the crops would be 
light, or less than last year, sacks were reason- 
ably low; and the same 
condition also affects the 
price of freights. The 
shipping "ring" would 
have every farmer believe 
that there are again, this 
year not ships enough to 
freight the wheat, and 
having nearly all the ton- 
nage to themselves, up 
goes the freight. 

Now the facts un- 
doubtedly are, that the 
crop cannot possibly ex- 
ceed that of last year, 
and as there are ships 
enough chartered to take 
the whole crop away in 
reasonable time, the prob- 
ability is that if farmers 
do not crowd the market 
till it absolutely chokes, 
there will be no rise in 
freight. Let the farmers 
hold on to every bushel 
of wheat they can till it 
is wanted, actually called 
for to complete cargoes 
and a fair price will be 
obtained for every bushel 
of our surplus. 

There are several large 
farmers in different parts 
of the State, who are 
making arrangements to 
store their grain in bulk, 
determined that the rapa- 
cious maw of the middle- 
men and "ring" man- 
agers shall no longer 
utterly consume the 
whole cost and profit of 
production. 
The farmers through the action of the 
Granges should combine — and in a year or two 
will — and procure their own ships and Bhip 
their own wheat; and show to the plunderers 
of their hard earnings, that they are entirely 
competent to manage their grain interest, and 
possibly to some considerable extent the politi- 
cal affairs of the State. 



Sounding the Pacific. — The Navy Depart- 
ment, for several days past, has had under con- 
sideration a proposed line of soundings, be- 
tween the American and Asiatic continents, 
across the Pacific ocean. Instructions have 
been sent to Commander Belknap, command- 
ing their. S. steamer "Tusearora," in this city, 
in regard to the immediate execution of this 
work. It is proposed to make two lines of 
soundings — one on the arc of the great circle, 
and the other by a more southerly route. The 
former will run close to the Aleutian Archipel- 
ego, and will probably touch at one of the is- 
lands of the Japanese group. The "Tusearo- 
ra" will sail some time during August. 

Copper.— The PuebloCAie/fain says: The cop- 
per mines near Canon city are being very 
satisfactorily developed, the ore taken from 
the lodes four or five feet in width bearing 52 
per cent, of copper. Messrs. Paine, Allen, 
Dickerson and Jennings are about to erect 
copper reduction works, to be completed some 
time during the summer. 

The mines in Husdler, in Victoria, have 
yielded a profit to their English shareholders 
of £400,000 since the month of Ootober, 1871. 



July 12, 1873.] 



MTNING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



23 



UsEfdL l^fORfl^JION. 



Care of Guns, 

A true sportsman, like a good soldier, should 
always be prepared for inspection, and keep 
his weapons in condition for immediate service. 
On his return from a day's shooting, before he 
lies down to rest, he should see that his gun 
is fit for service on the morrow. At the end of 
the shooting season it is much more important 
that this should be done at once else it may be 
forgotten, and a favorite and a valuable wea- 
pon injured beyond repair by silent corrosion. 
To prevent this, here is a preparation which 
we nave nsed for years and which we know to 
be good: Twenty ounces best olive oil, one 
ounce and a half spirits of turpentine. This 
should be rubbed on the gun-barrels, outside 
and in, with a rag; leave all that adheres to the 
barrels, and put the gun away until wanted. 
Do this and you may bid defiance to rust, even 
iu the rainy season of California. 

How to Clean a Gun,— No one should put 
away a gun without cleaning, not even if it has 
tired but one shot, that one barrel should be 
cleaned. First take the barrels off the stock, 
and immerse them in cold water about four 
inches deep. Then wrap some Btout cloth (tow 
clings to the barrels, and leaves particles in 
them,) about the cleaning rod, so thick that 
you will have to press rather hard to get it into 
the barrela; then pump up and down, changing 
the cloth till the water comes out clear; then 
pour hot water into them, stopping up the nip- 
ples, and turn them muzzles downward. Then 
Eut on dry cloth, and work till you can feel the 
eat through the barrels, and the cloth comes 
out without a particle of moisture on it. Then 
put a few drops of clarified oil (made by put- 
ting rusty nails into good salad oil, ) on the 
cloth and rub the insides; rub the ontsides all 
over and then put the gun away. 

Jumping. — Mr. Wilson, an English professor 
of gymnastics, writes as follows on the subj ect 
of jumping: A high jumper will clear five feot, 
a first rate one five feet and a half, and an out 
and outer among the first rates, six feet. The 
late Mr. Ingleby of Lancaster, we have seen 
olear a stick held six feet two inches high, 
springing off the turnpike road with a run of 
about five yards. "What Ireland could do with- 
out the spring board we know not — probably 
not two inches more thanJMr. I. Mr. Ingleby 
despised perpendicularity, and swayed himself 
over almost horizontally with singular grace, 
elegance and facility. Twelve feet is a good 
standing single jump on level ground; fourteen 
is a job for two or three in the country; twenty 
feet is a first-rate running single jump, but has 
been done often; twenty-one is something very 
extraordinary, but noways apocryphal; and 
twenty-two is, we believe, accomplished about 
once every twenty years, and that almost al- 
ways by an Irishman. A hundred sovereigns 
to five against any man iu Engiand doing 
twenty-three feet on a dead level. .With a run 
and a leap, on a slightly inclined plane, per- 
haps an inch to a yard, we have seen twenty- 
three feet done in great style, and measured to 
a nicety; but the man who did it (aged twenty- 
one, hight five feet eleven inches, weight eleven 
stone) was admitted to be (Ireland excepted) 
the best fair leaper of his day in England! 

Facts About Ropes. — " Alston's Treatise on 
Seamanship" gives the following facts and 
rules for computing the strength of ropes: 

" To find what size rope you require, when 
roven as a tackle, to lift a given weight, divide 
the weight to be raised by the number of parts 
at the movable block, to obtain the strain on 
a single part; add one-third of this for the in- 
creased strain brought by friction, and reeve 
the rope of corresponding strength. 

" One-sixth of 40 tons is 6% tons, which, 
with one-third added, is 9 tons nearly, for 
which you should reeve a six-inch or six and a 
half inch rope. 

"Conversely — To find what weight a given 
rope will lift when rove as a tackle: Multiply 
the weight that the rope is capable of suspend- 
ing by the number of parts at the movable 
block, and substract one-fourth of this for re- 
sistance. 

"Thus: 8-9 tons, the strength of the rope, 
multiplied by 6, the number of parts at the 
movable block, minus 13-3, or one-fourth, gives 
40-1 tons as the weight required. 

" Wire rope is more than twice the strength 
of hemp rope of the same circumference; splic- 
ing a rope is supposed to weaken it one-eighth. 

"The strongest description of hemp rope iu 
untarred, white, three-stranded rope; and the 
next in the scale of strength is the common 
three-strand, hawser laid rope, tarred." 

Adulterating Tea. — That sugar can be 
'sanded" is too well known by the grocers to ad- 
mitof dispute;but the process of "doctoring" 
tea is a trick probably peculiar to the China- 
man. Dr. Letheby, of London, a well known 
sanitary statist, made an examination into sam- 
ples of this article obtained from bonded ware- 
houses, which he found to contain from forty 
to forty-three per cent of iron filings and nine- 
teen per cent of silica, in the form of fine sand, 
which had been cleverly mixed with and added 
to the leaves before curling, with a view to in- 
crease their weight and bulk. After the leaves 
were curled they had been thickly covered with 
a green pigment. When it was infused in 
boiling water it produced a turbid solution, of- 
fensive to the smell and nauseous to the taste. 



Wilfir Tiur. — It sometimes becomes desira- 
ble to rid one's premises of the unpleasant 
presence of numerons wasps, and here is a way 
to do it as suggested by a cotemporary : Mount 
four panes of glass of equal dimensions in tin 
framing (like a lantern), leave the top and bot- 
tom open, cover the latter end with thick white 
paper well attached with strong water-proof 
glue, and the paper well oiled, and protected 
from damp or fire. In this make a hole about 
six inches in diameter, and then place this 
hole over a plate, on which three "pieces of 
1 bricks are put; iu this plate you will have put 
1 a mixture of beer, sugar, and a little rum. On 
the top end you will have fitted in a glass 
pane, removable at pleasure, to clean the 
tray. Now prepare some long matches of 
stout paper dipped in brimstone; when your 
I trap is "all alive" with captives, ignite a 
I match and put it under the hole, they will soon 
be suffocated. Each day empty out the con- 
tents for your pet toad's dinner. I once saw 
a most ingenious insect-catcher in Africa, in- 
vented by some English Artisan. There was 
a wirework dome like a meat cover; just below 
it a roller covered with cloth, saturated in 
syrup, slowly revolved when the clockwork ad- 
justment had been wound up. Into this "Si- 
rens cave" every flying thing tempted to set- 
tle on the sweet stuff was unconsoiously drawn, 
and the oage was soon a museum of Diptera 
and Hymenoptera! There was a trap-door at 
which the suffocating operation was carried 
out (as in the first mentioned trap). It was 
altogether a great success. 

Enameling Cooking Vessels. — To enamel 
the inside of copper cooking vessels, in whioh 
acid fruit and vegetables are cooked, and thus 
prevent the formation of the so-called " verdi- 
gris," the following method is recommended: 
Twelve parts of unburnt gypsum and one part 
borax are finely powdered, intimately mixed, 
and fused in a crucible. The fused mass is 
then poured out, and after cooling, is rubbed 
up to a paste with water. The copper vessel 
is to be coated inside with this preparation, 
applied by means of a brush, and the vessel 
placed in a moderately warm place, so that the 
coating may dry uniformly, after which it is 
subjected to a gradual increasing heat, till at 
length the preparation fuses. On cooling, the 
vessel is found to be protected internally by a 
white opaque enamel, adhering very firmly to 
the copper, not chipping off by ordinary knock- 
ing and rubbing, and impervious to vegetable 
acids. 



Ctrniotrs Facts in Science. — Science has elic- 
ited many curious facts respecting water, 
among which are subjoined. Of every twelve 
hundred tons of earth a landholder has in his 
estate, four hundred are water. The snow- 
capped summits of Snowdon and Ben Nevis 
have water in a solidified form. The air we 
breathe contains five grains of water to every 
cubic foot of its bulk. The potatoes and tur- 
nips which are boiled for dinner have, in their 
raw state, the one seventy-five per cent, and the 
other ninety per cent, of water. If a man 
weighing ten stone were squeezed flat in a hy- 
draulic press, seven and a half stone of water 
would run out, and only two and a half dry rest- 
due remain. A man is chemically speaking, 
forty-five pounds carbon and nitrogen, diffused 
through fi ve and a half pailsful of wa ter. 

Uses of Willow Wood. — In England there 
are few varieties of wood in greater demand 
than good willow wood, of good size. It is 
light, smooth, soft and tough, will take a good 
polish and does not easily burn. It will bear 
more pounding and hard knocks, without 
splinter or serious injury than any other 
wood, and hence it is used for cricket bats, and 
whenever it can be obtained in good condition 
and of suitable size — for the floats of steamer- 
paddleB, "strouds" of water-wheels, break- 
blocks for luggage and coal trucks, etc., where 
the wear and tear is considerable. To the 
wood-turner it is invaluable, and were it grown 
as timber, and obtainable, it might be largely 
used for very many purposes to which timber 
is now applied, and that too with considerable 
advantage to both consumer and producer. 

The Earth's Density. — As the density of 
the earth is equal to a solid globe of gold — 
the heaviest of metals — of nearly 6,000 miles 
in diameter, instead of 8,000, the full diameter 
of the earth, the question naturally arises as to 
.what can that centre portion be composed of, 
which offers such an incalculable resistance to 
the centrifugal motion of the planet on its axis, 
a velocity of 1,100 miles a minute for its equa- 
torial regions. 

From Joppa to Jerusalem by Rail. — Under 
the above head the newspapers are announcing, 
as a new illustration of modern progress, that 
travelers are now taken over that historic road 
by rail. The truth is that the surveys for a 
railroad over that route have lately been com- 
pleted, and plans sent to Constantinople for 
the consideration of the Minister of Public 
Works. 

Over one hundred and fifty kilns are engaged 
in making crockery ware exclusively, in the 
United States. These kilns are capable of pro- 
ducing at the rate of about $30,000 worth of 
ware each per year, making a total, for all 
of nearly $4,500,000 per year. 

Ltme to the Ton. — When hot from the kiln, 
twenty-six and a half bushels of ground lime 
go to the ton; but after keeping some time a 
ton swells to thirty bushels. A bushel of fresh 
lime may be taken at one-seventh more than a 
bushel of stale lime. 



Qood H e 4>tH- 



Bathing. 

Bathing is not only an act of cleanliness, but 
is in an eminent degree conducive to health. 
The fine and sensitive pores of the skin Boon 
become torpid and their delicate and most im- 
portant functions are suspended by the solid 
materials in the perspiration, and the accumu- 
lations of filth, and require very frequent 
ablution, with water, to preserve their normal 
condition, without which no person can be 
healthy, happy or God-like in any sense. The 
mere wearing of proper clothing and washing 
of the more exposed portions of the body, and 
the frequent changing of clothing, is but an 
imperfect attempt at cleanliness, without being 
accompanied by entire submersion of the body 
in water, either tepid or cold. It must be ad- 
mitted by every sensible person, that there is 
no more real appreciative luxury than a 
pleasant warm general bath when the system 
is in a proper condition to receive suoh bath; it 
is, in faot, one of the most valuable but most 
negleoted hygienic remedies we possess. 

We admit that many people are susceptible 
of taking cold, and are, so to apeak, " living 
barometers;" but even to such the warm bath 
would always prove advantageous. One half 
or mo/e of the rheumatic twinges, swollen 
limbs, and cramped joints that occur in such 
persons, would yield to proper perseverance 
and confidence in this potent alleviator. For 
ordinary purposes, care must be taken that a 
warm bath is not used at too high a tempera- 
ture at first. As a general rule we would 
advise, more especially in cases where some 
chronic disease is firmly looated, using the 
warm bath for a few days, first followed by the 
tepid bath, then the cold. In all cases, wheth- 
er the warm, tepid or cool bath is used, the 
first should be of only a few minutes duration, 
which may soon be increased to fifteen or 
twenty minutes at a time, care being taken 
never to remain immersed sufficiently long to 
induce a sensation of cold on coming out. A 
healthy reaction should follow the bath, and a 
pleasant glow of warmth should diffuse itself 
over the surface of the body. If this be not 
the case, the bath has been indulged in too 
long, or injudiciously taken. When any symp- 
tom appears that contra-indicate the use of the 
cold bath, the tepid, warm or vapor bath may 
be substituted, according to circumstances; the 
spirit vapor bath especially, is one of our most 
safe and valued curative and porphylactic 



In conclusion we would say to all, keep the 
skin free and active in health or disease by 
some kind of bathing, the frequency of which 
must of course depend upon all the surround- 
ings and conditions of each life in all that per- 
tains to habits, etc., etc. — Ex. 



Cooling Off. 

Every observing farmer knows that men and 
horses are the only animals that have double 
means of refrigeration, and all others have but 
one. No other beings sweat like men and 
horses, and therefore cannot cool themselves 
by perspiring through the skin. This will be 
found true throughout the whole range of com- 
parative anatomy, and applies to the largest as 
well as the smallest beings. All the thick-skin- 
ned animals except the horse, have powers in 
the skin to exhale heat by perspiration, it being 
only a secretive surface. All the cleft-feet spe- 
cies, including those with feet and toes round- 
ed and unprovided with claws, the rhinoceros, 
elephant, bison, mastadon, buffalo, swine, ox, 
deer, lion, tiger, bear, wolf, fox, squirrel, dor- 
mouse, oppossum, raccoon, all, like the dog, 
have no means of cooling themselves, when 
heated, except through the medium of respira- 
tion. Thus the ox, when very hot, thrusts out 
his tongue and pants, to exhale the heat gene- 
rated by exercise; and if driven without time 
allowed for this, will die with the heat that ac- 
cumulates within him. 

Hogs perspire mainly through their fore 
legs. There is a spot on each leg, just below 
the knee, in the form of a sieve. Through this 
the sweat passes. And it is necessary that this 
is kept open. If it gets closed, as is sometimes 
the case, the hog will get sick; he will appear 
stiff and cramped — and unless he gets relief it 
will go hard with him. To cure him, sim- 
ily open the pores. This is done by rub- 
ing the spot with a corn-cob, and washing 
with warm water. Hogs often die when driven 
too fast, because they cannot readily part with 
their generated heat. 

Brain-Work and Brain-Worry. — This is the 
text of a good hygienic discourse in a foreign 
journal, and the "conclusion of the whole 
matter" is as follows: "Brain-work is condu- 
cive to health and longevity, while brain-worry 
causes diseases and shortens life. The truth 
of the statement, and its application to what 
we see around us, is evident enough; yet it is 
well that such subjects should be continually 
discussed. Intellectual labor, although severe, 
like that performed by the judges of our high- 
er courts, or by scholars and persons devoted 
to literary pursuits, if unmixed with excite- 
ment, and followed with regularity, is seen to 
promote bodily health and long life. On the 
other hand, mental cares, attended with sup- 
pressed emotions, and occupations which from 
their nature are subject to great vicissitudes of 



fortune, and constant anxiety, break down the 
lives of the strongest. Every one has seen a 
class of men whose early mental training was 
deficient, and to whom the writing of memo- 
randa was irksome, engaged in middle life in 
great undertakings, and taking the memory 
with a mass of complicated business accounts, 
simply because they oould more easily remem- 
ber than write. Their power of memory for a 
certain kind of facts is truly astonishing, out the 
strain is at last too much, and they die before 
their time. The brain-worry of our school 
children might furnish useful illustrations of 
the truth of the same general proposition, but 
we forebear." 



DoptEs-pc EcotJopY- 



Ripe Bread. 

Bread made out of wheat flour, when taken 
out of the oven, is unprepared for the stomach. 
It should go through a change, or ripen before 
it is eaten. Young persons, or persons in the 
enjoyment of vigorous health, may eat bread 
immediately after being baked without any 
sensible injury from it; but weakly and aged 
persons cannot; and none can eat such with- 
out doing harm to the digestive organs. 
Bread, after being baked, goes through a 
change similar to the change in newly brewed 
beer, or newly churned buttermilk, neither 
being healthy until after the change. During 
the change in bread it sends off a large portion 
of carbon or unhealthy gas and imbibes a large 
portion of oxygen or healthy gas. Bread has, 
according to the computation of physicians, 
one-fifth more nutriment in it when ripe than 
when just out of the oven. It not only has 
more nutriment, but imparts a much greater 
degree of cheerfulness. He that eats old. ripe 
bread will have a much greater flow of animal 
spirits than he would were he to eat unripe 
bread. Bread, as before observed, discharges 
carbon and imbibes oxygen. One thing in con- 
nection with this thought should be particu- 
larly noticed by all house-wives. It is, to let 
the bread ripen where it can inhale the oxygen 
in a pure state. Bread will alwayB taste 
of the air that surrounds it while ripening; 
hence it should ripen where the air is pure. It 
should never ripen in a cellar, nor in a close 
cupboard, nor in a bedroom. The noxious va- 
pors of a cellar or a cupboard Bhould never 
enter into and form a part of the bread we eat. 
Bread should be light, well baked, and proper- 
ly ripened before it should be eaten. Bread 
that is several days old may be renewed so as 
to have all the freshness and lightness of new 
bread, by simply putting it into a common 
steamer over the fire, and steaming it half or 
three-quarters of an hour. The vessel under 
the steamer containing the water should not 
be more than half full, otherwise the water 
may boil up into the steamer, and wet the 
bread. After the bread is thus steamed, it 
should be taken out of the steamer and wrap- 
ped loosely in a cloth, to dry and cool, and re- 
main so a short time, when it will be ready to 
be cut and used. It will then be like cold new 
bread, — American Farmer, 

Root Beer. — As the season is now upon us 
when the greatest demand exists for this popu- 
lar beverage, it may interest some of our 
readers, to learn that it is most satisfactorily 
made by a process similar to that used for soda 
water. If the old method of fermentation be 
adopted, it requires that a number of special- 
ties for it be in constant use; that the root 
beer is only in the right condition for use dur- 
ing a limited time, and if kept on hand too 
long, it runs into the acetic fermentation and 
gets sour. By the soda water method it can 
quickly be made, is ready for use at once, re- 
mains good until all is drawn off, and does not 
sour. We give the following process, employed 
with great satisfaction by a correspondent of 
the Druggist Circular: — 

Sugar bouse syrup , or nice molasses H gallon. 

Knapp'o extract for root beer 1 ounce. 

Caramel (to color) 1 to 2 ounces. 

♦Flavor for root beer , 1 ounce. 

This may be kept ready mixed in a bottle, and, 
when necessary, is put into a soda water foun- 
tain, with four and a half gallons of water, 
and then charged with carbonic acid to a 
pressure of 80 or 100 pounds to the square 
inch, as indicated by the usual gauge upon the 
apparatus. Those of our readers having a 
soda water apparatus can readily use one or 
more fountains for this purpose with both 
convenience and profit. 

*Flavor for root beer: — 

Oil wintergreen 4 drachma. 

Oil sassafras 2 " 

Oil Cloves 1 " 

Alcohol 4 ounces. 

Mix. 

Adulterations in Olive Oil. — Olive oil 
is very generally adulterated with poppy 
or lard oil. Such adulterations may be 
detected as follows : dissolve six parts of quick- 
silver in seven and a half of nitric acid of a 
specific gravity of 1.36 — dissolve without heat. 
Add one part of this freshly prepared solution 
of nitrate of mercury to ten of the oil. If the 
latter be quite pure the mixture will solidify in 
from three to four hours. Fish oils maybe de- 
tected in vegetable oils by the red tint they 
give; when the oil to be tested, is mixed in the 
proportion of five volumes to one of sulphuric 
acid; or in the same way with similar effects, 
you may use a solution of caustic soda, of the 
specific gravity of 1.34 



24 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12 1873. 




W. B. EWER Seniob Editoe 

DEWEY «Sc CO., Putolisliers. 

A. T. DEWEY, GEO, E. BTBONG 

W. B. EWER, 3WO. L. BOONE 

Office, No. 338 Montgomery St., S. E. Cor- 
ner of California St., diagonally across from 
Wells, Fargo & Co.'s. 

Subscriptions payable In advance — For one year, J4; 
aix montha, $2.60; three months, $1.25. Clubs of ten 
names or mote, $3 each per annum. $5, in advance, 
will pay for 1H year. Remittances by registered letters 
or P. O. orders at our risk. 
AnvEBTisrao Rates. — Iweek. 1 month. S months, lyear. 

Per line 25 .80 $2.00 $5.00 

One-half inch $1.00 $3.00 7.60 24.00 

One inch 2.00 6.00 14.00 40.00 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or 
reading notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing 
in extraordinary type or in particular partB of the paper, 
insertedd at special rates. 



San. Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 12, 1873. 



Legal Tender Rates.— S. F., Thurs., July 10. - 
buying 87; Belling 87%. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

9 

GENERAL EDITORIALS. — Artificial Marble; 
Indian Troubles in Arizona, 17. Explosion at Vir- 
ginia— Nitro-GUycerine and its Compounds; Academy 
of Sciences, 24. To Obtain a Patent; The Press- 
man's Guide, 25. 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— Hickard's Ore Washer, 17. 
The Santa Barbara Grape- Vine, 22. The Sluthour 
Pump; Jordan's Attachment for Horseshoes, 25. 

CORRESPONDENCE.— Notes of Travel in Eureka 
and Elko Counties, Nevada, 18. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. —American Iron 
in England; The Future Supplies of the Superior 
Metals; A New Cement— Pfundite, 19. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— Impurities in Lead; 
Soluble Glass; Cause of the Decomposition of Eggs; 
New Horticultural Fertilizer; How Deltas are Forini d; 
Renewal of the Reward of One Hundred Thousand 
Dollars, 19. 

MINING SUMMARY from various counties in 
California, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Arizona, Idaho and 
Montana. 21-8. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Table of Daily 
Sales and Prices and Comparative Prices for the 
"Week; Notices of Assessments; Meetings and Divi- 
dends; Review of Stock Market for the Week, 20. 

USEFUL INFORMATION. — Care of Guns; 
Jumping; Facts About Ropes; Adulterating Tea; 
Wasp Trap; Enameling Cooking Vessels; Curious 
Facts in Science; Uses of Willow Wood; The Earth's 
Density; From Joppa to Jerusalem by Rail; Lime to 
the Ton, 23- 

GOOD HEALTH. — Baihing; .Cooling off; Brain- 
Work and Brain-Worry, 23. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.— Ripe Bread; Root Beer; 

MISCELLANEOUS. — Cherry Creek Mines; New 
Mines at Sitka; Supply of Nickel, 18. A Revolution 
in the Production of Butter; New Lake; The Colorado 
Desert; Sounding the Pacific; Copper, 22. Patents 
and Inventions, 25. Clarence King on Veins, Depos- 
its and Limestone Formation; The San Francisco 
Mint, 26. 



Central Pacific Directors. — The annual 
election of the Central Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany for Directors was held at the office in 
Sacramento on the 8th inst. The following 
gentleman were elected Directors for the en- 
suing year, without opposition: Leland Stan- 
ford, C. P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, E. H. 
Miller, Jr., Robert Robinson, C. H. Cummings 
and Wm. E. Brown. 



Reports from "Wyoming state that extensive 
placer mines have been found near the head 
waters of the Big Laramie River and its tribu- 
taries. It is said by people from there that 
there are 40 or 50 miles of gulches that will 
pay $10 per day to the hand. 

An expedition is being fitted out in this city 
to fish for pearls on the Mexican Coast, on 
this side, as far down as Panama. A diving 
bell is to be used — the same tried in fishing for 
gold sands at Gold Bluff. 

The recent warm weather has cleared all 
the Utah canons of snow, and the shipment of 
ore is going on on a grand scale. Times are 
reported lively at Alta, more minerB being 
employed than ever before. 

The new quicksilver mines, from twelve to 
fourteen miles from Healdsburg, are sending in 
quicksilver to that town. The opening of the 
mines has just commenced. 



Anderson's School of Natural History, Pen- 
ecke'B Island, under the supervision of Pro- 
fessor Agassiz, opened on the 8th inst. 

Silver-bearing quartz is said to have been 
found in the Coast Range of mountains in 
Clatsop county, Oregon. 



The first locomotive for the Pioche and 
Sevier narrow-gauge railroad arrived in Salt 
Lake City this week. 

Borax. — It is stated that parties in this city 
have paid $10,000 for a borax mine in Kern 
county, 



The Explosion at Virginia— Nitro- 
Glycerine and Its Compounds. 

The fearful explosion at Virginia City, which 
occurred on the 29th ult., and caused such 
great loss of life and property, is still fresh in 
the minds of the people, and the feeling gains 
ground that its origin should be thoroughly 
investigated. That large amounts of explosive 
compounds should be kept in a dwelling-house 
in the center of a populous town, is strange 
enough, especially when the dangerous nature 
of the substances'in question is well known. 
The impression prevails, and is corroborated 
by direct testimony that experiments were be- 
ing made with explosive compounds by one 
of the victims — General Van Bokkelen — 
in order to invent an explosive that would 
take the place of Giant Powder. The local pa- 
pers state that six cans of nitro-glycerine were 
stored under the bedroom of the gentleman re- 
ferred to, a few days previous to the accident. 
It is also stated that a quantity of Giant Pow- 
der, Hercules Powder, and common black 
powder, as well as gun-cotton, were in the 
bailding. It could hardly have been possible 
to have collected in one spot anything more 
likely to cause an explosion than these sub- 
stances; and to make them even more danger- 
ous, a pet monkey was kept in the room. If 
the experiments referred to have been going 
on for any length of time, the only wonder is 
that the accidentfdid not occur before it did. 

General "Van Bokkelen was acting as sort of 
agent for the sale of Giant Powder in Virginia. 
He was paid a commission on his sales, as are 
others in the same business. Some of the large 
companies on the Comstock, who use quanti- 
ties of the powder, preferred to buy of the 
principals in this city, both on account of be- 
coming dissatisfied with Van Bokkelen's man- 
ner of doing business, and tho fact that the 
article could be purchased here with the com- 
mission paid to agents deducted. Van Bok- 
kelen demurred to this action of the company, 
but they insisted on their right to sell without 
the interference of the middle-men, and he re- 
solved to invent a powder of his own. To this 
end experiments were instituted with nitro- 
glycerine, gun-cotton, etc. That these things 
were present there is no doubt ; that Giant 
Powder was in the building there is a doubt. 
At the coroner's inquest, Frank M. Thayer, a 
mining Superintendent, who has been employed 
at the Savage, Julia and Arizona and Utah 
mines, and who is familiar with Giant Powder 
and its odor, did not detect any smell of that 
compound at the time of the explosion. The com- 
pany state that there was none there at the 
time. The Hercules Powder company, a rival 
to the Giant Powder company, reduced the 
rates of their powder a short time since, and 
the latter company were forced to do the same, 
lowering the rate from $1 to 75 cents. In 
April the Giant Powder company sent a man 
to Virginia to take account of the powder in 
the hands of Van Bokkelen, and other parties 
in Gold Hill and Silver City, who were acting 
as agents. This was done that the amount they 
had on hand should be sold to them at reduced 
rates as well as what they were then buying, 
for obvious reasons. At that time Van Bok- 
kelen stated that he had from 50 to 60 cases in 
the magazine and 10 in Smith's hardware 
store. He would not be likely to conceal the 
presence of other boxes, as he would have to 
pay $1 instead of 75 cents per pound for it 
when settling up. Since then only 25 cases 
have been sent up which were for one order. 

At that time the Giant Powder Company's 
traveling agent, Mr. "White, was in Mr. Van 
Bokkelen's room with him. He is nowin Utah, 
but immediately on hearing of the explosion, 
he wrote to the company in this city, and as 
his letter throws some light on the subject, we 
have been permitted to copy it. It is as fol- 
lows-: 

Ophir Canon, Utah, July 2d, 1873. 
Bandmann, Nielsen & Co., San Francisco. 

Dear Sirs:— Have just seen the telegraphic account of 
the terribie expiosion in Virginia City, in which it is 
stated that 150 pounds of Giant Powder, together with 
six cans of nitro-glycerine and ;200 pounds of black 
powder, were exploded. As far as the Giant Powder is 
concerned, this is a mistake. Gen. Van Bokkelen kept 
his supply |of Giant Powder stored in the magazine of 
J. P. Smith, and had for many months c past. As you 
entered the General's office on B street, in the first cor- 
ner to the right, were two sample cases of Hercules 
Powder; one case of Hercules Powder and gun- cotton 
saturated with nitro-glycerine, and one case of cotton 
pulp saturated with nitro-glycerine. These cases were 
about the size used by your company; and. as Gen. Van 
Bokkelen was for some time your agent in Virginia, to 
the casual observer, the cases would pass for those of 
the Giant Powder Co.; but the two cases of Hercules 
Powder were so branded, while the gun cotton and cot- 
ton pulp were branded "Powder Cartridges," from the 
California Powder Co., and the shipping mark was " J. 
P. Smith, Virginia," with J. S. V. in the lower lett hand 
corner. "When I viBited Gen. Van Bokkelen to take 
account of his stock and settle his accounts with your- 
selves, as the General Agents of the Giant Powder Co., 
he told me he would soon have a blasting agent in the 
market that would excel Giant Powder. On my asking 
what it was.he turned to the above mentioned cases and 
opened them, showing me the gun cotton saturated 
with nitro-glycerine, together with the cotton pulp 
mixture. (It was this fact that caused me to particu- 
larly|notice the marks and brands on the cases.) DuriDg 
this conversation, Gen. Van Bokkelen said, "White, 
when I get this fairly started, which will be in about 
six weeks, I'll give you $300, and expenses per month, 
to introduce it to the mining public." And, I presume, 
it was for the purpose of making these cotton-nitro- 
glycerine compounds that he had the six cans of nitro- 
glycerine. Any of the attachees of J. P. Smith's hard- 
ware store will tell you Van Bokkelen always kept his 
order book there; and they^attended to his powder busi- 
ness during his absence, and will confirm my statement 
as to the Giant Powder being stored in Smith's magazine. 
Yours, truly, Osoab 'W. White, 
Traveling Agont G. P. Co 



Mr. Kent, at the inquest, testified to having 
seen the General making experiments with 
cartridges in his room. Mr. Searles testifies 
that there were two boxes in his room 
that looked like Giant Powder, and the Gen- 
aral told him to be careful in handling them, 
so they were probably the gun cotton., Mr. 
Kellogg, foreman of the Crown Point mine, 
testified that the General, not long ago, wanted 
him to try a preparation of gun cotton and nitro- 
glycerine at the mine, saying it was as safe and 
effective as Giant Powder. Kellogg refused to 
try it, as the agent of the Hercules Powder 
Company, who had experimented with it, said 
it was not safe. Van Bokkelen had about 25 
pounds of it at that time. Other testimony 
goes to prove that experiments were being 
made to get a substance to supersede Giant 
and Hercules powder. 

The unfortunate result of these experiments 
ought to warn others who are ignorant of 
chemistry from meddling with substances, the 
nature of which they do not understand. 
Nitro-glycerine, particularly is a most danger- 
ous substance to handle, even with the greatest 
care. As a general thing it is made on the spot 
where it is to be used. It is against the law 
to transport it on steamers or railroads. The 
Giant Powder Company in this city never even 
keep it over night. It is made in the morn- 
ing and turned into Giant Powder at night, to 
prevent accidents. 

As the nature of the substance is little known 
we are confident that some account of its 
manufacture and properties will be read with 
interest. Nitro-glycerine is made from a mix- 
ture of nitric and sulphuric acid, one part of 
the former and two of the latter. Into this is 
introduced slowly a small stream of glycerine; 
the mass is kept constantly stirred and cooled. 
The nitro-glycerine forms by this process and 
while it is in this mixture swims on top of the 
acids on account of its specific gravity. The 
whole mixture is now run into water, and it is 
repeatedly stirred in the water in order to 
completely free it of all acid. It is washed in 
three different waters and an alkaline substance 
added to neutralize the acids. If any acids re- 
main it is very dangerous or it is liable to ex- 
plode, and this was the mistake made which 
led to so many accidents. After stirring 
it in the large bodies of water, it was 
sometimes allowed to remain, and as it was 
heavier it sank to the bottom. It was sup- 
posed that the water would protect it from all 
chemical action and danger of explosion; but 
on the contrary it seems that it was not in all 
instances completely freed from acid and the 
result was a chemical action of the acids on the 
nitro-glycerine. causing heat and a generation 
of gases. 

Now, if this process of decomposition occurs 
without being confined under water or other 
wise, the nitro-glycerine is set on fire, and 
burned up; but if the decomposition is allowed 
to take place under a considerable weight of 
water, or is otherwise confined, the gases can- 
not escape freely, and an explosion follows. 
For this reason all manufacturers of nitro 
glycerine are careful, in addition to washing 
the substance thoroughly, to apply an alkaline 
substance to neutralize any trace of acids that 
may remain. The secretof securing the safety 
of nitro-glycerine from explosion, lies in 
" cushioning " it. The sharpuess and violence 
of the conoussion of a blow is what explodes 
it. A nail can be driven in by a blow, not 
pushed in unless with great force. The princi- 
ple is simple, and well understood. If a soft 
substance is placed between the nail 
and hammer the blow has little effect. 
The nitro-glycerine is put in a cushion, so to 
speak. There are different substances used 
for this purpose, the best of which 
is infusorial earth. When in that condition 
you might as well try to drive a nail with a 
sand bag, as explode it by concussion. It is 
then Giant Powder. The infusoria in the 
earth used, form so many little tubes, the force 
of capillary attraction absorbing a -large 
amount of nitro-glycerine, which is cushioned 
in this manner. Every material with which 
nitro-glycerine is mixed which has not these 
absorbent properties in a high degree, is dan- 
gerous, for if by any means nitro-glycerine 
runs or is squeezed out, you have all the orig- 
inal dangers of pure nitro-glycerine. C:m- 
mon gunpowder absorbs a considerable portion 
of nitro-glycerine, but is more dangerous than 
infusorial earth, as it comes out easier. It 
will hold about 55 or (50 per cent, while the in- 
fusorial earth holds 75 per cent. In warm 
weather it exudes from the powder badly. 

Cotton ia a poor absorbent and vory danger- 
ous; chalk also; magnesia is a good one. The 
present Hercules powder, which used to be 
made of black powder and nitro-glycerine is 
said to be made with magnesia, and in ordinary 
temperatures may be deemed a safe absorbent. 
The higher the temperature the more liability 
to leakage in all of these substances. These 
compounds explode more readily according to 
temperature and wetness or exudation. 

Giant Powder, formed of nitro-glycerine, is 
well known in the East, and has been used in 
large quantities here since 1868, and in Europe 
since 1867. No accidents have ever occurred with 
it in transportation. It never has exploded 
where the blame was chargeable to the powder. 
The Austrian Government having first prohibit- 
ed its transportation on railroads and stages, in 
1869 reversed the law, it having been proven 
that it was perfectly safe. It is carried every- 
where on this Coast. There are five factories 
of it in Europe, one in this city, and one in 
New Jersey. The consumption is from 1,500,- 
-. 000 to 2,000,000 pounds per year, carried about 
»Nin every possible way. All the explosions 



which have occurred in this city were caused 
by nitro-glycerine, not powder. At the only 
explosion ever occurring here, at the Giant 
Powder Company's "Works, in 1869, when the' 
nitro-glycerine blew up, there were 5,000' 
pounds of Giant Powder within thirty feet 
of the nitro-glycerine, which was unharmed. 
The concussion blew open the boxes, but did- 
not explode the powder. The nitro-glycerine 1 
was left under water at that time.which caused 
the explosion, as spoken of above. Very recent- 
ly, when the steamer " Meteor" burned up, on 1 
Lake Michigan, there were 8,000 pounds of Giant 
Powder aboard, which all burned up, with the 
entire cargo, without any explosion, whatever,. 
Here are two simplecases illustrating that 
it will not explode by ordinary concussion, or-' 
by the action of heat. 

In the matter of heat it is peculiar. It cars 
be burnt. If a small particle of the powder is- 
put on a bar~of iron, one end of which is in a 
fire and red-hot, the red end will burn it; the 
cold end has no effect; but on the part where' 
there is a dull heat there will be a semi-explos- 
ion or detonation once perhaps in thirty or' 
forty times in trying it, but not uniformly. 
Put this in a gas pipe under similar conditions'- 
and it will explode violently, being confined 1 .. 
But unless the confinement is such as to re-- 
strain the gases it will burn up. In tin vessels; 
or wooden boxes there is no explosion, but in 
a quicksilver flask closed tight, it would burst- 
The large caps made- for the purpose are the- 
only things that will explode it. If a small 
piece of Giant Powder is placed on a hard sub- 
stance and ground up fine by rubbing with a-. 
knife for some time, and then struck it will ex- 
plode. But then it is nitro glycerine, notpow- 
der. In grinding, the capillary tubes are des- 
troyed, the powder turns from white to brown 1 
and then darker, while a dampness is percept- 
ible, showing that the nitro-glycerine has ex- 
uded or been forced out. These conditions are- 
not likely to occur in every day use of the; 
powder. 

It will be seen from the foregoing what dan- 
ger there was to ignorant persons to experiment 
with nitro-glycerine and its compounds. If 
the nitro-glycerine used was not thoroughly 
washed free of all acid, it is likely to explode at 
any time. If the gun cotton exuded the nitro- 
glycerine, as it would, the slightest jar would 
be sufficient to explode it. All these experi- 
ments were made by Nobel, the patentee of 
Giant Powder, when first inventing his com- 
pound. They were all found to be dangerous. 
The use of black powder was at that time and 
since, tried, but discontinued, for it would not 
hold the nitro-glycerine in warm weather and 
was therefore dangerous. It is not possible' 
that the explosion was caused by Giant Pow- 
der, but nitro-glycerine either pure or mixed 1 
with the gun-cotton. To show that a concus- 
sion will not explode Giant Powder and that 
the nitro-glycerine explosion could not have 
set it off, the instance of the violent explosion; 
in this city may be cited, as well as many oth-- 
ers. In England, very recently, a box of the. 
powder was put on the buffer of a car, which 
was allowed to run down a grade and collide- 
with another violently, smashing up both cars,, 
but no explosion took place. The flames would! 
burn but not explode it. 

The verdict of the Coroner's Jury, convened! 
at Virginia to hold an inquest on the bodies of 
several who were killed, states that tiie jury 
believe that the explosion was caused by gum 
cotton saturated with nitro-glycerine in the 
deceased Van Bokkelen's room. It is not likely 
thut the nitro glycerine was made there, but 
must have been shipped there by parties un- 
known. In doing this the law was not only- 
violated, but people's lives were endangered 
while it was in transitu. The poor fellows who- 
were making the experiments lost their lives- 
by them, and others suffered from their ignor- 
ance and carelessness. It is to be hoped that 
what we have said will deter others from ex- 
perimenting in the same direction, without a 
thorough knowledge of the conditions under 
which nitro glycerine will explode, and even 
then the utmost precautions must be taken to- 
prevent explosions. 

Academy of Sciences. 

At the last meeting of the Academy of Scien- 
ces, the following members were elected: W. 
S. .Chapman, (Life); Major Geo. H. Mendell, 
P. A. Bishop, John C. Robinson, F. A. Miller, 
O. Button and J. W. Class. 

A number of donations were received. 
Among them a skate's egg, a number of stuffed 
birds, a peculiar specimen of crawfish, a fe- 
male tarantula and eggs, in her nest, and sev- 
eral mineral specimens. 

Prof. Davidson explained the character of 
the instruments used in triangulation, and the- 
various modifications made in their construc- 
tion for the purpose of more readily determin- 
ing the distance of any given object from the 
point of observation, illustrating his remarks 
on the blackboard. He stated that he hoped 
to be able at the next meeting of'the Academy 
to show an instrument of his own invention, 
with which he could determine the exact dis- 
tance from the point of observation to any giv- 
en object, by a new method. 

It. E. C. iStearns, read a long and interesting 
paper on the money of uncivilized man, more 
particularly referring to wampum, or different 
kinds of shells. 

The President stated thatC. E. Watkins, the 
photographer had offered to furnish a cabinet 
photograph of each one of the members, pro- 
vided the Academy would furnish an album to 
contain them. 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



25 



To Obtain a Patent 

Editor Morning CaU: — Afl the f-i/Mimusto bo 
posted pretty much upon all topicn, would it be 
kind enough, in the present initnnoe, to inform 
an old und regular Babsoriber, through its 
columns, the way to apply (or a patent. No 
one hereabouts seems to have any knowledge 
of the matter. No matter where y<<u inquire, 
you are aa once referred to those agents who 
make it a busiuesn, and who expect a round fee 
for their services— too much. Furthermore, 
you are compelled, in employing those parties, 
to disclose your secret, which is something 
altogether t^o hazardous, as not a few have 
found out to their cost beforo now. What 
your subscriber desires to know, is, how to place 
Lis application K-fore the Commissioner of the 
Patent Oflico at Washington, in such shape as 
to have his business properly recogni/L'l, with- 
out the aid of the "middleman," the cost of 
the fee, and where to get the proper blank, uud 
how to send it, and when to expect a notice of 
his application at the hands of the Commis- 
sioner. The way to obtain a copyright is sim- 
ple enough. But propor information in 
respect to a patent is not so easily reached. 
By giving this information you will confer a 
favor, doubtless, on many of your readers. 
The money that might be required to fee the 
agents might not be so great an obstacle. It 
is the cold fact that you are placed in the 
power of those who might take advantage of 
your plans and inventions, and so work it to 
your loss and confusion, which they palpably 
could. Trusting that my meaning is clear, 
and hoping that the favor will not occasion too 
much trouble, your respectful subscriber signs 
himself. Inventor. 

San Francisco, July 5th. 

[We can do ro otherwise than to refer " In- 
ventor " to some respectable and responsible 
patent agency. "Inventor" would not at- 
tempt to defend an intricate and difficult law- 
Buit without the aid of a lawyer; and in 
obtaining a patent, just as a claim before 
Government, it is best and cheapest to secure 
an efficient and experienced agent. We never 
heard of one of these stealing a man's inven- 
tion.— £YJ, Call.] 

The above letter published in the Morning 
Call of this city, during the past week, fairly 
illustrates the feeling of a class of people in 
every community, in regard to Patent Agents. 
While we stand ready to acknowledge that all 
Patent Agents are not immaculate, we do 
deny the sweeping charge made by "Inventor." 
He certainly never talked with any person 
who had ever done business through the 
Scientific Prkss Patent Agency. 

It is the same with Patent Agents as it is 
with lawyers, doctors, preachers or the mem- 
bers of any other profession. Either can do a 
community a vast amount of good, or a vast 
amount of harm, according to his manner of 
doing business. The inventor however, has 
one consolation, and that is, that a patent 
agent who abuses the confidence of his clients 
is sure to reap the result of his errors, by be- 
ing avoided by subsequent inventors. The 
best test in the world to prove the standing of 
any professional person, is to find out what 
his old clients think of him. If they rec- 
commend him, and give him their business, 
why should you distrust him? Dewey & Co. 
have conducted a Patent Agency in connection 
with this paper, for the past twelve years. 
During that time wo have procured over three 
thousand patents for Pacific Coast inventors, 
and we venture the assertion, that to-day not a 
man can be found out of the large number 
for whom we have done business, that will 
assert, that we ever attempted to take the 
slightest advantage of him or his invention. 
On the other hand you will find hundreds, and 
we might say thousands who will tell you that 
Dewey & Co., have, as faithful advisors, saved 
them hundreds of dollars, which otherwise 
would have been spent in a fruitless attempt to 
patent an old device, and further, these same 
persons will tell you that the Patent Agency of 
Dewey & Co. has disseminated a knowledge of 
patent matters amongst inventors on this coast, 
which they could not have obtained in any 
■other way. 

"Inventor" grumbles at the "fee" charged 
by Patent Agents. Did "Inventor" know that 
Dewey & Co. charge precisely the same fee for 
procuring a patent that New York or Washington 
agents charge ? or, knowing this, does he wish 
to abolish Patent Agents entirely ? He certainly 
does not expect them to exist and work for 
nothing. For the future benefit of "Inventor" 
we will give him this piece of information. 
Not only is it beneficial to the inventor to em- 
ploy a competent agent to do his business, but 
the Patent Office in Washington prefers that 
inventors should apply through an agent. 
First: A patent specification is a legal docu- 
ment, requiring both legal and mechanical 
skill in its preparation, otherwise it will fail 
when you apply the test of the courts to its va- 
lidity. Secondly: The rules, regulations and 
forms, required by the Patent Office to be ob- 
served, are continually being changed so that 
it requires the undivided attention of the agent 
to keep himself posted. We venture to say 
that every case presented to the Patent Office 



by the inventor himself, causes more troublo 
and annoyance to the Examiners than twenty 
cases presented by a competent attorney. 
These are facts that havo been long established 
and we are familiar with a number of instances 
where the Examiner refused to proceed further 
with a case until a competent agent was em- 
ployed and the case put into shape. In every 
such instance the application was made by the 
inventor and was found to be informal. The 
inventor, not being familiar with the rales, &0., 
of the office, each step he took placed his case 
in a worse condition than before, until finally 
nothing short of the skill of an attorney could 
get it into proper shape. 

Tho Patent Agent should bo posted not only 
in the legal and Patent Office practice, but his 
business is such that he becomes familiar with 
the existing state of all the arts. By making 
frequent preliminary examinations, he learns 
what has been done in almost every field of 
art and commerce, hence he is qualified to ad- 
vise as to the novelty and patentability of any 
particular invention. There is a certain list 
of inventions which are reproduced every few 
weeks by enthusiastic inventors, who would 
rush "bald headed" for a patent, aud pay out 
their money only to be rejected, were they not 
checked before hand; for instance, every few 
weeks we have some one to present us tho 
model of a combined beer faucet and tap, the 
object of which is to draw beer from a barrel 
without driving in the cork. Within the past 
year this same device, without the slightest 
alteration, has been presented to us at least 
twenty times, and in each case we have saved 
the inventor his money by showing him the 
illustration of it in the Patent Reports. 

We might recite numerous points of benefit 
which the inventor obtains by being able to 
consult a competent Patent Agent, but the 
abovo shows sufficiently the error of "Inven- 
tor's" statements. Let "Inventor" seek an hon- 
est, reliable, responsible and competent Patent 
Agent, and place his case in his hands, and we 
will warrant him that he will fare much better 
than if he attempted the business himself. To 
find such an agent let him go to those persons 
who have procured patents before him, and 
find out by enquiry whom to go to. 



Supporting Attachment for Horse- 
shoes. 

We illustrate herewith a device intended to 
keep horses from sinking in soft ground. It is 
styled a "supporting attachment for horse- 




JORDAN'S HOKSESHOE ATTACHMENT. 

shoes," and was recently patented through the 
agency connected with this office by Robert K. 
Jordan, of Alameda county. The nature of the 
attachment can be easily seen by reference to 
the cut. It is an ordinary horseshoe, the heels 
or extremities of which are made longer than 
usual, and the extension thus formed bent out- 
wards in opposite directions as shown. A met- 
allic rim-plate of the desired width, (usually 
from an inch to an inch and a half) is bent so 
as to encircle the shoe; its length being great- 
er than its width, so as to extend a short dis- 
tance both in the front and in the rear of the 
heel and toe of the shoe. The sides of this 
surrounding rim-plate are secured to the out- 
wardly bent extensions, by means of rivets or 
bolts, while the forward part of the plate is 
bent upwards and supported by a bar or plate 
from the toe of the shoe. 

The bar or plate will usually be welded or 
permanently secured to the toe of the shoe 
when the shoe is made, and in fastening the 
plate to its opposite or upper end, a bolt or 
screw can be used so that when desired the 
rim-plate can be removed from the foot. The 
bar or plate shown stands upward at an angle, 
so that its upper end will support the forward 
end of the shoe at a point above the plane of 
the shoe, thus preventing the rim-plate from 
iuterfering with the stepping of the horse. 
The band which encircles the forward part of 
the horse's hoof can be used or not, as de- 
sired, but the inventor prefers its use, as it aids 
in binding the shoe with greater firmness to 
the foot; when it is used its opposite ends are 
also secured to the extensions at the heel, as 
shown. The attachment can be applied to 



worn out horseshoes if desired, as the charac- 
ter of the soil on which the bearing rim 
would be likely to be used, would not require 
that the shoe should be as perfect as is neces- 
sary on harder ground. The inventor claims 
that with this attachment to their hind shoes, 
horses can travel over ground in which they 
would sink to their knees if not provided with 
any supporting device. The attachment is 
cheap, simple and light, and Mr. Jordan thinks 
it will not interfere with the travel of horses 
after they once become accustomed to weiring 
it. 

The Sluthour Pump. 

We give this week an illustration of the force 
pump, for which letters patent were issued, 
April 'Jtb, 1870, to Mr. Sluthour, of Ohio. 
The particular form represented is designed 
for mining or deep well purposes. It will be 
at once remarked, that the peculiarity of this 
pump lies in the fact that the power is ap- 
plied at the ground level by the lever a, as 
seen in the engraving, aud transmitted by con- 
necting rods, C, C, to the working part beneath. 
When a large pump, requiring a driving engine, 
is employed, this proves a matter of great con- 
venience. 

"This pump," says the circular of the com- 
pany, "has been approved (as a fire and 
bilge pump,) and adopted by the Supervising 
Board of Inspectors of Steam Vessels, and by 






Patents & 



INVENTIONS. 




A DEEP WELL PTJMP. 

the Secretary of the Treasury; as appears by 
Circular No. 4, issued from the Treasury De- 
partment, Feb. 21st, 1872." For it are 
claimed the following advantages: Simplicity; 
durability; economy of power— it being stated 
that only one-third the power usually required, 
to drive any force pump of equal capacity, is 
needed by the Sluthour; and utility as a fire 
extinguisher, though applied ordinarily to other 
purposes. 

Different styles are manufactured to meet 
varying requirements; in point of capacity rang- 
ing from the hand pump of ten gallons, to the 
monster steam pump delivering one thousand 
gallons per minute; and to be suitable for 
hand, horse, windmill or steam power. Those 
who may be interested in seeing the piimp in 
practical operation, will do well to call at the 
warerooms of the Keeler, Hine and Thomas 
Co., 727 Market street, where it is on exhi- 
bition. 



Mining Deposits and Patents. — Commis- 
sioner Drummond of the General Land Office, 
has decided that lands valuable on account of 
deposits of carbonate of soda, nitrate of soda, 
sulphur, alum and salt, may be patented under 
the mining Act of May 10th, 1872, as well as 
other valuable mineral deposits, except those 
specially reserved by Act of Congress. 



Telegraphic List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacific Coast Inventors. 

FitoM Okfiimvl Bbpobct r<m the MrKiwi and Scien- 
tific. POKSB, DEWES ft CO., PuBLISDElts AND 
U. B. and FoitEtON Patent Agents] 

By Special Dispatch, Dated Washington, 

D. O.. July 8th, 1873. 

Fob. Wbbe Endino June 24th, 1873. 

Adding Machine. — Gustavns Linderoos, Point 

Arena, Gal, 
Oar Coupling.— Mordecai Disney, assignor 
to H. C. Kirjbe and J. D. Hildreth, Oak- 
laud, Cal. 
Kindling Wood-Cutter. — Nicolas Sonnichsen, 

S. F. r Cal. 
Sectional Cam for Ore Stamps. — James M. 

Thompson, S. F., Cal. 
Ore Stamp Feeder.— John D. Cnsenbary ami 

James A. Mars, S. F., Cal. 
Pim-jyentino Incrustation in Steam Boilers. — 

Kobt. A. Fisher, S. F., Cal. 
Sheep Shears. — Andrew S. McWilliams, Co- 

lnsa, Oal. 
Plow. — John C. Potter, Helena, Cal. 
Mortising Machine.— -John Driver, Murys- 

ville, Cal. 
Paint Brush. — Syranus Standish, Eureka, 

Nevada. 
Medical Compound fob the Cure op Consump- 
tion.— William H. H. White, S. F., Cal. 

*The patents are not ready for delivery by the 

Patent Office until some 14 days after the date of Issue . 
Note. — Copies of D. S. and Foreign Patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., In the shortest time possible (by tel- 
egraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent 
buBineBB for Pacific coast inventors transacted with 
greater Hecurity and in much less time than by any other 
agency. 



Kiver mining promises to be more favorable 
this season than for many years, along the 
Trinity; numbers of Chinamen are at work 
there. 



San Francisco and the Interior. 

An erroneous impression seems to have been 
in some way impressed upon the minds of 
many in the interior, to the effect that San 
Franciseo is responsible for the excessive levies 
which are made upon the people, in the way of 
wharfage aud dock charges; that San Francisco, 
in fact, sits at the Golden Gate as a toll-gatherer, 
taxing the industry of the interior for 
her especial benefit. We often find in 
the columns of oar interior cotempora- 
ries paragraphs like the following, which we 
clip from a late number of the Colusa Sun: 

"We were informed by a Colusa County 
farmer that he had to pay one year four hun- 
dred dollars wharfage on his grain crop. Let 
the farmers' organizations inquire into this 
matter, and if there is any thing for the Legis- 
lature to do, let them demand that it shall be 
done. For one, we do not believe in letting 
San Francisco sit down at the Golden Gate 
like a toll-gatherer, and tax the industry of the 
country at such a fearful rate. " 

We fully agree with the Sun, that the Legis- 
lature should look after this matter, ff .nd free 
the State from the onerous burthen imposed 
upon her in the manner indicated; but we 
fail to see how San Francisco can be held 
responsible for such a state of things. If left 
to the people of this city, or their represen- 
tatives, this burdensome tax could be removed 
at once. Indeed the only effort ever made for 
such removal was initiated and urged by the 
people of this city, and their representatives 
at Sacramento, and with such effect that the 
charges were reduced about one half. 

The fact should be known and published in 
every interior journal that San Francisco has 
not one dollar's interest in the wharf and dock 
at this port; but that the Legislature both 
levies the dues and directs the disbursement of 
the moneys derived therefrom. This informa- 
tion should be published to the end that our 
interior friends may see to it that legislators 
are sent to Sacramento, next winter, who are 
opposed to such extortionate charges and by 
whose votes the thing may be done away 
with. 

The interior delegations opposed to such ex- 
cessive charges will be promptly aided by the 
delegates from this city. We say, with the 
Sun, "Let the farmers' organizations inquire 
into this matter," and see that no one receives 
their support for the next Legislature who is 
not all right on this important issue. 

The Pressman's'Gtjide. — Too little attention is given 
to the press-work done in ordinary American newspaper 
printing. The setting of type on a weekly paper occu 
pies the entire time of perhaps a dozen compositors, 
while the actual printing is done by one or two hands 
in 24 hours. And yet the fine appearance of the sheet 
depends as much upon the press-work as upon the 
composition At least nine-tenths of all newspaper 
printing {except on duily publications) is done too 
hurriedly and at a consequent waBto. It would there- 
fore benefit publishers (as well as the eyesight of "many 
readers") if greater attention were paid to the press- work 
on newspapers. We know all this from 15 years experi- 
ence and observation in printing. 

To assist both presBman and publisher, R. Cummius 
& Co., of Brooklyn, have printed and oiler for Bale, for 
50 cents per copy, a pamphlet bearing tho some title as 
the beading of this item. It is a simple work contain- 
ing hintB, instructions, recipes, etc., which we dare tay 
would repay nearly every publisher, pressman aud ap- 
prentice in the Union to purchase and review. 



26 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



Clarence King on Veins, Deposits and 
Limestone Formation. 

The White Pine News is publishing in extenso 
the testimony of Clarence King, the eminent 
mining expert, in the ease of the Eureka Con- 
solidated Mining Co. against the Richmond 
Mining Co., of Eureka, Nevada. From the 
voluminous testimony elicited on the examina- 
tion, we condense some interesting points. 
Mr. King first states that he is by profession _a 
geologist and studied at the Yale Scientific 
School, under Dana. He is now Director of 
the Geological Survey of the Fortieth Parallel. 

Q. How long have you been engaged in that 
work? A. Since April, 1867. 

Q. Have you had occasion while engaged 
upon that survey to examine the mines of 
his coast? A. Yes, Sir. 

Q. Are you acquainted with the Richmond 
workings on Ruby Hill? A. I am. 

Q. You understand that map that is posted 

there, I presume? [referring to the "map of 

the Bichmotd mine of Eureka, 1872"] A. Yes, 

sir. 
Q. Just describe in your own way how in 

your judgment that deposit of ore was formed 
there, the cavity formed in which it is depos- 
ited, how the ore was formed, and how it is 
classified by geologists, or how it would be 
classified ? A. 

The Geological Formation of Ruby Hill 
Is qaite a simplo one, the main mass of the 
Hill being formed of an underlying bed of 
quartzite, which is capped by transition strata 
of silicious limestone and followed upward by 
heavy beds of chrystalline metamorphic lime- 
tsone. This hill, from its evident connection 
with the other mountains of the region, is the 
eroded fragment of a fold or mountain uplift. 
The strata of which it is composed are submar- 
ine in origin. They belong, as shown by fos- 
sils discovered here in them by assistants of 
my own, to the Silurian and devonian period, a 
very early period of the stratified rocks. 
These fossils also show that it was an oceanic 
deposit. Other geological evidence gotten in 
here, and throughout the Great Basin, show 
that these strata were lifted from their submar- 
ine position at the close of the triassic period, 
and folded into mountains and permanently 
lifted above the level of the sea, in fact, at that 
time they reaohed their present altitude above 
the level of the Pacific. Such an immense up- 
lift as this, with the consequent pressure in the 
axes of the folds, produces two great effects: 
the metamorphism of the strata and the Assur- 
ing of the strata. 

Connected with such deep-seated Assuring 
as must necessarily take place in the folding 
of beds, which our survey has proven to be 
30,000 feet thick, the fissures must necessarily 
penetrate to a great depth, and that they have 
penetrated to a great depth is proven by the 
deep-seated chemical action which has made it- 
self evident through these fissures, resulting 
partly in mineral veins, partly in metallic min- 
eral veins or lodes. la this especial instance, 
the evidence of uplift is present in the inclina- 
tion of the main beds of the formation. The 
evidence of Assuring is present in the disloca- 
tion of strata, the presence of planes of Assur- 
ing, of cavities and of stiration of surface, in- 
dicating actual faulting. So far as that goes, 
we have them up to that point a submarine de- 
posit lifted high into the air metamorphosed 
and riven with fissures. Upon entering the 
Richmond mine at this point, B, where the old 
incline begins, we find ourselves immediately 
in ore, or within a few feet in ore, and following 
its workings downward to this point (showing) 
with a descent of about 140 feet, if I remem- 
ber right, or 138, perhaps, to be more exact, 
were all the way in ore. That ore is composed 
of three recognizable zones: that next the low- 
er country rock, or silicious limestone, contain- 
ing chiefly iron material impregnated with gal- 
ena and carbonates of lead and silver; a cen- 
tral zone chiefly occupied by carbonates of sil- 
ver and lead colored with oxide of iron; and a 
third zone which usually caps the deposit, 
which is poorer; chiefly oxide of iron, whose 
tenure of ore, however, is carried up by gold. 

The Presence of a Deposit 

Of this character — I use the word deposit not in 
a technical sense in which it has been usedhere, 
but in the generic sense, in which it is alone 
known to geologists, so far as I am aware— to 
include all those bodies of ore which are found 
in the solid rock, or otherwise all deposits of 
ore. The presence of such a — or, I should go 
back a little further and state that at three 
points in the Richmond workings, having gone 
downward through the ore perpendicular to its 
general inclination, we come upon a surface of 
silicious limestone, which, in my opinion, is 
the definite foot-wall of the vein, and that in 
two or three places in the upward developments 
of the mine we come upon broken surfaces of 
limestone more or less shattered in their sur- 
face, more or less impregnated for a little way 
with bunches and stringers of ore, which I 
take to be the rough hanging wall of the lode. 
The presence of a body of ore like this, en- 
closed in solid rock, can have owed its origin 
to only one, as I take it, of three possible 
causes: either it was laid down synchronously 
with the strata, that is upon what is now the 
approximate foot-wall of the vein, and upper 



country limestone was laid down on the top of 
it; or else it was poured in by the Divine hand 
from the top; or else, like other fissures and 
true veins, it percolated from a deep source. I 
shall briefly examine these 

Three Possible Theories 
To see what ground is left us to stand on. In 
the case of ore beds, as they are technically 
termed, we have deposits of various metallic 
minerals which are absolutely a part of the 
stratification, following the plane of stratifica- 
tion resting upon the even surface of submar- 
ine deposition, in no case penetrating into the 
foot-wall an inch or a foot; having a level sur- 
face of deposition on their own top and fol- 
lowed in the course of deposition by the upper 
country rock in a smooth plane. Such deposts 
sometimes — often occur in iron and coal, 
and such minerals as that. The evidence as 
to the bedded origin of this vein is very clear. 
In the first place, the body of ore does not ex- 
actly follow the planes of stratification, but 
breaks into them here and there, and along- 
side that within the solid body of ore ar.e masses 
of limestone, which are termed " horses." 
Not going through like a continuous sheet, as 
if they had been deposited upon a top portion 
of the ore during the general deposition of ore, 
but terminating at their ends and of irregular 
form, thereby conclusively proving that the 
body could not have been deposited in the or- 
dinary method of oceanic deposition. To ex- 
amine for a moment the other possible theory, 
that it was poured in from the top. 

Ample Geological Evidence 

Exists that these mountains, as I have said, 
since the close of the triassic period — a period 
anterior to even the chalk period of England — 
have been in their present positions of eleva- 
tions ; and furthermore, that the only portions 
of the Great Basin that have been since that 
period covered by water, have been covered 
by fresh water lakes. They simply occupied 
the broad meridinal depression of valleys or 
synioal axes of these ranges, resulting in proof 
to my mind absolutely conclusive that these 
mountains have never since that period been 
covered by water, and in order to suppose the 
mineral material to have been poured in from 
above, we should have to have some Angel 
Gabriel with a pitcher, or some other superhu- 
man enginery, to get this material in there; and 
the fact that it was never done, is proven by 
the conditions within the ore body itself, for 
whenever you pour a material into a cavity, it 
shows the results of stratification inevitably, 
which this does not; showing a bedding paral- 
lel in a measure to the inclination of its dip. 
Furthermore, in order to have the cavity to 
have poured this material into from above, it 
is necessary that we should have had a fissure 
to begin with, for the water percolating or flow- 
ing over solid limestone, has not the power to 
eat or erode its way into it. It must first 
find some crevice, some fissure, some hole 
formed by dynamic agencies, into which it can 
percolate, and create the cavern, or aperture, 
or hollow, or whatever you wish to call it. 
Therefore, I say, that it could not have been 
poured in from above, and that even if the 
evidence of stratification were present, of its 
having been poured in from above, it would 
necessarily have implied a fissure to begin 
with. I therefore reject these two propositions 
as absurd; the proposition of a bedded vein, 
or of a deposit poured in from above. I am 
therefore driven back on the first theory, 

That it is a Vein or Lode; 

And I will as briefly as possible examine the 
evidence which exists bearing upon this ques- 
tion. In. the first place, within the Richmond 
works. I will indicate the points which Imean 
exactly. At this point here, (showing) just 
within the little arched mass of rock which 
overhangs the opening of that tunnel which 
runs to the Richmond incline — 

Mr. Hillhouse — (interrupting) — Just desig- 
nate it, if you please, by letters as you go 
along, Mr. King, and we can get it down. 

A. Well, it is in the immediate neighbor- 
hood of that B. I don't know within half an 
inch there on the map exactly the spot, for that 
little archway is not indicated. And underly- 
ing the body of ore is a smooth, well-defined 
face of rock, possessing upon its surface marks 
of attrition or striation, the polish of move- 
ment, and differing altogether from the ordi- 
nary ro.ugh planes of stratification. Upon de- 
scending the main incline of the Richmond 
mine, and following this lowest level to this 
point, (showing) the limestone up to this time 
showing various evidences of Assuring and 
somewhat silicious in its nature, shows at that 
point the same foot-wall equally smooth, equal- 
ly evincing the lines of movement. 

Q. What is that last point? Just name it. 
A. The last point of that map is near the 
point E. Yes, sir; near the point E. At a 
third place, which is at this point N, the bottom 
of that is also a moderately smooth surface of 
silicious limeBtone, which, from its pitch and 
its relation of depth to this (showing), and its 
relation of strike and depth to that, (showing,) 
I take to be the same plane which bounds the 
ore in that direction. At a point FF — no, 
FF, at a point 15, if I know the map rightly, 
is also an upper surface of limestone, which I 
take to be the lowest manifestation of the 
hanging country or hanging wall, irregular 
though it be. Down this incline, (showing,) 
over the lead, appears also limestone; slightly 
impregnated with blocks of ore, but, neverthe- 
less, a country limestone, and the develop- 
ments which have been run into the Tiptop, 
out in this direction, (showing,) through first 
the Richmond, into the Tiptop, and out in 



that direction, prove that that is the country 
rock, and that there are no masses of ore of 
any consequence above that point. Beneath 
what I called the foot-wall the shaft has gone 
down on an incline of 250 or 300 feet under- 
neath the foot-wall altogether in country lime- 
stone, and run out on a drift through coun- 
try limestone, proving that at those points 
there are no important or considerable string- 
ers or outlyers of ore in that direction. The 
evidence, at I have said, of fissuring is in the 
surface of these walls, which do not absolute- 
ly follow the planes of stratification, and pos- 
sess physical differences from those planes of 
stratification in the cross of fissures which 
make themselves apparent at 'the end of the 
workings in this direction, (showing,) and at 
the end of this ore chamber — at the edge of 
this ore chamber here, (showing,) where 
The Limestone of the Country Rook, 
With also lines of fracture and fissuring, bound 
the deposits at those points. 

Q. Now name those points where it is 
bounded by that? A. At this ore chamber be- 
neath the point of winze No. 5, and also at a 
point nctt on this map, where a long incline 
runs up or about the Lookout line. So far as 
the surveyors have gone, they consider it to 
be just about on the Lookout line. I see 
every structural evidence that the origin of 
this opening, or hollow in the rock, was by a 
Assure. I believe that the ascending currents 
of mineralized hot water from which this thing 
emanated, in passing upward through these 
fissures, owing to the solubility — the ready 
solubility of the limestone, has here and there 
often very greatly enlarged the original fissure, 
opening the great cavern which has been sub- 
sequently filled by ore. The whole history of 
the 

Study of Mineral Deposits 
Approaohing this at all in character, show that 
they have proceeded from a deep-seated labora- 
tory. The minerals of which they are com- 
posed, the mineral continuations, the chemi- 
oal combinations in which they are formed, 
cannot have been made except by the succes- 
sive introduction of mineralizing liquids and 
gasses. The presence of gold, the presence of 
arsenic, the presence of sulphydric acid, which 
has mineralized the galena, taken together, in- 
dicate the regular succession of chemical 
changes which have gone on according to the 
best authorities in chemico-geology in all veins. 
The peculiarities, I contend of this particular 
deposit, are wholly to be accounted for by the 
special'condition of the country rock. Veins 
in general, that is I mean 

True Veins, 
May be said to be the result of the forces of 
fissuring from a deep source, and, second, of 
the emanation of chemical materials from that 
deep and heated source. They differ from 
each other widely as to appearances, widely as 
to chemical history, and widely as to shape 
and form. Those veins which are in the solid 
granite, and in a large family of gneiss and 
cuptalline schist rocks, present the phenome- 
na of an ordinary tabular vein. Those veins, 
on the contrary, owing their origin to similar 
forces, but created in different country rock — 
those that are found in the volcanic rocks, the 
porphyries of Mexico, the porphylite of Hun- 
gary, and the porphyries of Washoe, are im- 
mese irregular veins, owing to peculiarities of 
the texture of the rock, and the tendency to 
conchoidal fractures, forming elliptical cham- 
bers which those volcanic rocks possess. 
There Is a third claBB of veins, those where 
the identical forces have acted on soft, sugary 
rocks, rocks which from their mineralogical 
and lithological structure, have a tendency 
when met by a given force to shatter in every 
direction. That class of stones are the lime- 
stones and the dolomites of this world, and the 
same forces have acted on these dolomites and 
limestones in their metamorphic conditions. 
The results have been immense irregular frac- 
tures of very great diversity of form, and a 
consequent irregularity and difficulty of fol- 
lowing the ore deposit itself. I contend that 
the sole difference between the three classes of 
veins is, that of the country rock upon which 
the fissuring force has acted, and through 
which the deep-Beated chemistry has done its 
work. I also lay down this proposition: that 
given the deep-seated fissure, and given the 
deep-seated chemical action, the form has 
nothing to do with its nature as a vein, and 
that the amplitude or irregularity of chambers 
is in no way — in no way militates against the 
theory of its being a vein. I pronounce this 
to be a ' vein. 

Mr. Wren — Q. Where is the top or apex of 
that lode? A. The apex of anything is its top, 
and the apex, as I understand it, of a mineral 
vein, is its outcrop, if it has one, and if it has 
not, the highest point on any given section to 
which the vein matter rises. In this case, hav- 
ing a very definite outcrop, I should say that 
unquestionably the apex of the body was 
there. 



Profanity never did any man the least 
good. No man is the richer, or happier, 
or wiser for it. It commends no one to 
any society. It is disgusting to the refin- 
ed, abominable to the good, insulting _ to 
those with whom you associate, degrading 
to the mind, unprofitable, needless,, and 
injurious to society. 

None are so seldom found alone, and 
are so soon tired of their company, as 
those coxoombs who are on the best terms 
with themselves. — Lacon 



The San Francisco Mint. 

The annual "clean-up" of the Mint in this 
city was completed June 30th. The Mint has 
been closed for several weeks past for thi s pur- 
pose. The Coiner'B statement is as follows for 
the fiscal year : 

Ounces. Value. 

Gold Bullion worked 1,647,938.61 $30,659,322.97 

Legal Wastage on same... 2,042.48 37,664.84 

Actual Wastage 48,58 903.35 

Silver Bulion worked 183,266.94 213,436.73 

Legal Wastage on same 284.64 331,00 

Actual Wastage 1.41 1.64 

The following table shows the legal wastage 
allowed on bullion manipulated by the coiner, 
as well as the actual wastage during the past 
four fiscal years : 

GOLD BULLION. 

Fiscal. ^-Legal Wastage.—. —Actual Wastage-^ 

Tear. Ounces. Value. Ounces. Value. 

1869-70 2,731.91 $50,826.25 19,26 $358.45 

1870-71 2,682.28 49,902 88 47.02 874.79 

1871-72 2,601.14 48.393.30 51.43 956.83 

1872-73 2,024.48 37,664.84 48,58 903.35 

SILVER BULLION. 

1869-70 1,707.55 $1,986.96 44.39 $51.67 

1870-71 2,414\03 3,017.53 62.94 78,66 

1871-72 3,246.16 4,057.69 173.34 216.68 

1872-73 284.54 331,00 1.41 1.64 

In speaking of the efficiency of the Coiner, 
Mr. Harmstead, the Bulletin says: If we take 
the eight previous annual settlements, and di- 
vide them into two parts, and compare the 
aggregate of these two periods of four years 
each, with the operations of the outgoing 
Coiner, we have the following exhibit : 

GOLD MANIPULATED. 

Three Settlements Gold Bullion. Legal. Actual. 

ending with Worked. Wastage. Wastage. 

June 30, 1866, ounces. .7,507,611.95 11,261.38 615.04 

August 14, 1869 5,970,112.60 8,355 .14 1,207.14 

June30, 1873 6,991,498.92 10,039.81 166.29 

SILVER MANIPULATED. 

Three Settlements Silver Bullion. Legal Actual. 

ending with Worked. Wastage. Wastage. 

JunejSO, 1866, ounces. .2,898,725.47 5,777.49 302.26 

AugUBt 14, 1869 3,133,890.08 6,267.75 352,38 

June 30.1873 3,867,126.39 7,652 27 282.08 

The first column shows the quantities of bullion 
which have passed through the hands of the re- 
spective coiners; the second column gives the 
amount of wastage allowed by the Government 
in the manipulation of this bullion into coin, 
while the -last column shows how much was 
necessarily lost in the process. While all the 
coiners have come largely within the legal 
limits, the officer in charge for the last four 
years has made decidedly the best record in 
this respect. The value of his legal wastage 
on gold bullion is $186,787, while the value of 
his actual wastage is only $3,093. On silver 
bullion, the value of the legal wastage allowed 
him is $9,393, and his actual wastage is less 
than $349. 

The statement of J. P. Cochran, Smelter and 
Refiner of the Mint for the fiscal year, ending 
June 30th, 1873, is as follows: 

GOLD 'MELTED. 

Gold Bullion operated on during the year, 

in standard ounces .' 

Value of the Gold worked 

Legal limit of Wastage, standard ounceB 

Actual Wastage 

Value of Legal Wastage 

Value of Actual Wastage 



2,058,679.50 

$38,301,016.29 

3,682.95 

232,43 

$66,659.53 

$4,324.37 



SILVEK MELTED. 

Silver Bullion operated on during the year, 
in standard ounces- 

Value of Silver worked 

Legal limit of Wastage, standard ounces 

Value of Legal Wastage 

Excess of Silver delivered in settlement 
above am't ch'g'd limit, standard ozs. 

Value of excess I 

RECAPITULATION. 

Value of Legal Wastage on Gold 

Value of Legal Wastage on Silver 



Total value of Wastage 

Valueof actual Wastage on Gold $4,324.37 
From this deduct value of Silver 

exce&B.... 1,554.56 

And we have as the actual loss 

to Government 



286,900,99 

$333,848.42 

624.71 

$610.57 

1,214,50 
$1,654.56 

$66,669.53 
610.67 

$07,270.10 



$2,769.81 



Showing within the Legal loss the sum of $64,600.29 

The Mint opened on the 1st inst. under the 
charge of O. H. Lagrange, Superintendent; J. 
M. Eckfeldtv-Melter and Refiner; and J. T. 
Babcock, Coiner. 

The following report of the San Francisco 
Assaying and Refining Works for June has 
been published: 
Unparted Gold Bullion received in exchange from the 

Mint of the United States by San Francisco Assaying 

and Refining Works during June, 1873: 

Ounces. Value. 

Gold 11,019.44 $205,057.23 

Refined Gold and Silver deposited in United States 

Mint during June, 1873, by San Francisco Assaying 

and Refining Works: 

Ounces. Value. 

Gold 98,793.29 $2,026,028.06 

Silver 32,575.10 $41,054.75 



Gold deposited in Mine 98,793.29 $2,026,028.06 

Gold sold in markst 6,999.90 143,760.41 



Total Product of Refinery 105,793.19 $2,169,788.47 

Of the above fine silver $40,000 was deposited for 
Trade Dollars. As compared with June last year the 
result is as follows sent to Mint: 

k^ y Gold.———, i Silver , 

Ounces. Value. Ounces. Value. 

1872 85,680.04 $1,756,340.77 1,680.15 $2 116.25 

1873 98,793.29 2,026,028.06 82,675.10 41,054.75 



To Enxaege. — Pending the result of the big 
Cerro Gordo mining suit are the proposed en- 
largement and extensive improvements of the 
Belshaw & Beaudry furnaces. For some time 
they have been preparing to more than double 
their producing capacity, by means of more 
powerful blowers and cupolas of three times 
the size of those now in use. It is to be hoped 
that the suit will not long delay these operar 
tions. — Inyo Independent, 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



27 



r>EWEY Ac CO., 

American & Foreign Patent Agents, 

OFFICE. *» MONTGOMERY STREET. H. F. 

The best, speediest, and surest method for you 
to obtain patents, tile caveats, or tranaaet 
any other important business with the Patent 
Office at Washington, or with foreign coun- 
tries, is through tne agency of DEWEY & 
CO., PUBLISHERS OF THE MINING 
AND SCIENTIFIC PKESS, SAN IRAN- 
CISCO, an able, responsible, and long-estab- 
lished firm, and the principal agents on this 
side of the continent. They refer to the thous- 
ands of inventors who have patronized them, 
and to all prominent business men of the 
Pacific Coast, who are more or less familiar 
with their reputation as straightforward jour- 
nalists and patent solicitors and counsellors. 

We not only more readily apprehend the points 
and secure much more fully and quickly the 
patents for our home inventors, but with the 
influence of oar carefully read and extensively 
t-irculuted journals, we are enabled to illus- 
trate the intrinsic merits of their patents, and 
secure a due reward to the inventor, besides 
serving the public who are mure ready to give 
a fair trial, and adopt a good thing, upon 
the recommendation of honest and intelligent 
publishers. 

To Obtain Patent, 

A well-constructed model is generally first need- 
ed, if the invention can well be thus illustrated. 
It mnst not exceed 12 inches in length or 
hight. When practicable, a smaller model is 
even more desirable. Paint or engrave thu 
name of the article, and the name of the 
inventor, and his address upon it. 

Send the model (by express or other reliable 
conveyance), plainly addressed, to "Dkwet 
Jk Co., AIixino and Scientific Pbkss Office, 
San Francisco." At the same time, send a 
full description, embodjTng all the ideas and 
claims of the inventor respecting the im- 
provement describing the various ports and 
their operations. 

Also send $15 currency, amount of first fee of 
the Government. The case will be placed on 
our regular file, the drawings executed, and 
the documents made up, and soon sent to the 
inventor for signing. 

As soon as signed and returned to us with the 
fees then due us, it will be sent straightway 
to the Patent Office at Washngton. 

When the invention consists of a new article of 
manufacture, a medicine, or a new composi- 
tion, samples of the separated ingredients, 
sufficient to make the experiment (unless 
they are of a common and well-known char- 
acter), and also of the manufactured article 
itself, must be furnished, with full description 
of the entire preparation. 

For Processes, frequently no model or drawings 
are necessary. In such case, the applicant 
has only to send us an exact description, ttnd 
what is desirable to claim. 

For designs no models ore necessary. Dupli- 
cate drawings are required, and the specifica- 
tions and other papers should be made up 
with care and accuracy. In some instances for 
design patents two photographs, with the 
negative, answer well instead of drawings. 

For further information, send a stamp for our 
illustrated circular, containing a digest of Pa- 
tent Laws, 112 illustrated mechanical move- 
ments, and Hints and Instructions regarding 
the rights and privileges of inventors and 
patentees, which will be furnished post paid. 
Also a copy of NEW PATENT LAW of 1870. 

Address DEWET «Sc CO., 

POBLISHEBB, PATENT AGENTS AND ENGRAVEM,. 

No. S88 Montgomery street, S. F. 



C. P.JR. R. 

COMMENCING 

Sunday, June 29th, 1873, 
And until further notice. Trains and Boats will 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO. 



7 00 A - *** < Dail y>- Atlantic Express Train (via Oflk- 
,,wv land) for Sacramento, Maryaville, Redding, and 
Portland, P., Colfax, Reno, Ogden and Omaha 



7 30 A - M - < Dail y); C»l p - R - R . Steamer (fromBroad- 
1 ,<j\l way Wharf)— Connecting at Vallejo with Trains for 
Collstoga, Knight's LstnUinganii Sacramento; making close 
connection at Napa with stages for Sonoma. 



IO nrt M. (Sundays excepted). Stockton Steamer (from 
l£,uu Broadway Wharf), touching ut Vallejo, Benicia, 
and Landings on the San Joaquin river. 



O OQP.M. (Daily). San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
w>vw land), b topping at all way Stations. 



A an P. M. (Sundays excepted). Passenger Train (via 
f iUV Oakland) for Lathrop, Merced, Visalia, Tipton, and 
Los A ngeles, Stockton and Sacramento. 

4nfJ P. M. (Sundays excepted). Cat, P. R. It. Steamer 
■ uu ( rom Broadway Whan) connecting at Vallejo with 

Trains f or Oallntoga, Knight's Landi ng nn'l Sacraniei m.>. 

4nfl P. M. (Sundays excepted). Saoramento Steamer 
,uu (from Broadwar Wharf), touching at Benicia, and 
Landings on the Sacramento river. ___ 

6 On P. M. (Daily). Overland Emigrant Train (via Oak- 
■<*« land)— Through Freightand Accommodation. 



OAKLAND BRANCH.— Leave San Francisco, 7 00, 
8 10,9 2t>, 1W10 and 11 2U a, in.. 12 10, 1 50, 3 00, 4 00, 5 15,630, 8 15 
it.20 and '11 30 p. m. (9 20, 11 20 and 3 00 to Oakland only). 

Leave Bbooklyn (for San Francisco), *b 30, 6 40, 7 50, 9 00 
and 11 00 a. in., 1 30, 2 40, -1 55, ti 10, 7 55 and 10 10 p. m. 

Leave Oakland, % 40, 6 50, 8 00, 9 10, 10 00, and 1110 a. 
m., 1200, 1 40, 2 50, 3 .50, 5 05, 6 20, 8.05 and 10 20 p. m. 

ALAMEDA BRANCH. -Leave San Francisco, 7 20, 9 00 
and 11 15 a. m., 1 30, 4 00, 5 30, and 7 Ou p. in. (7 20, 11 15 and 
5 30 to Fruit Vale only). 

Leave HAYWABns (for San Francisco), *4 30, 7 00 andlO 45 
a. m., and 3 30 p. m. 

Leave Fbuit Vale, »5 25, 7 35, 9 00 and 1120 a. m., 130 
4 05 and 5 30 p. m. * Except Sundays, 

T. H. GOODMAN, A. N. TOWNE, 

Gen'l Paas'gr and Ticket Agt, Gen'l Sopt. 




For Sewing Machines, Dentists' 
Jewelers' Lathes. 

This Invention con be applied to the operating of all 
kinds of Sewing Machines, Dentists' and Jeweler-* 
Lathes. Its siiuplu u> is only equaled by ite durability; 
It avoids the use of tho treadle, which is ungraceful and 
Injurious. 

Application made by the Agents for the Pacific CoaBt. 

SAWYEK & WHEDON, 
lvGeowbp ftt3 Washington street San Francisco. 



AXLE _GREASE. 

To Millmen, Teamsters and Others. 

Your attention Is called to tho very superior AXLE 
OK EASE manufactured by us for over 18 years. 

It. cut improvements in the chemical arrangement 
of the lubricants used in its manufacture render Its use 
as serviceable on the lightest buggy as on the heaviest 
team. 

The extensive demand for tho H. & L. Axle 
Grease has enabled the proprietors to reduce its price 
to as low a rate as any of tho Inferior compounds, 
whi<*h ure continually being forced upon the market. 




See that the trade-mart (H. & L.) is on the red 
cover of the package, and take no other. 

HUCKS & LAMBERT, 

Manufacturers & Sole Proprietors, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Factory 145 Natoma Street. 

Depot 312 Jackson Street. 

10v5-lambp-Iy 



A. CARD. 

The subscriber offers hie services to the public for 
the examination of mines and mining properties. This 
State abounds in quartz mining properties, which are 
present failures from the want of knowledge in their 
development or management. Witness Nevada, £1 Do- 
rado, Tuolumne and Mariposa counties; witness oIbo 
Amador county with its Potosi. Seaton, Hazard, Ply- 
mouth, El Dorado, Original Amador, Herbertville, 
Union, Manoney, Summit and other gold mining prop- 
erties, all of which are intrinsically nrst-claBs mineB, 
yet all of the above and others in that county are pres- 
ent failure?. 

But their successful development depends upon 
aeology, Orology, Topography, a knowledge of " the 
Chemistry of Rocks and their relations to mines and 
mining," an apprehension of Nature's great plan of 
their development: in short, the mathematics of mining. 

In the above respect, the subscriber believes himself 
thoroughly master of the Bituation. Consultation free. 

Office, 543 Sacramento street, one door east of Mont- 
gomery. O. W. EASTON, 

Geologist and Mining Engineer. 

San Francisco, June 17, 1873. jn21-4t 



OAKEY & SON'S EMERY AND BLACK 

LEAD MILLS, Blackfriar's Road. London, England. 

OAKEY'S WELLINGTON KNIFE POLISH. 
Packets, 3d. each ; tins, &!., lw., 2s. 6d.. and 4s. each. 

OAKEY'S INDIA RUBBER KNIFE 
BOARDS from Is. fid. each. 

OAKEY'S SILVERSMITHS' SOAP (NON 
(MERCURIAL), lor Cleansing and Polishing Silver, Elec- 
tro-plate. Plate-glojw, Marble, etc. Tablet 1 *, 6d. each. 

OAKEY'S GENUINE EMERY, GRAIN 
AND FLOUR. 

OAKEY'S EMERY AND GLASS CLOTH. 

OAKEY'S CABINET GLASS PAPER, 
BLACK LEAD. etc. 

OAKEY'S GOODS SOLD EVERYWHERE 
by Ironmongera, Grocers, Oilmen, Brushmakers, Drug- 
gists. et« 21v25-ly 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMOND POINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest Btate of perfection, are prepared to till orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices. Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and BucceBBful working of numerous 
machines in operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on thiB coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. J. SEVERANCE k CO. 

Office, No. 315 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
24v26-tf 



Steam Boiler Manufactory 

— OF — 

JAMES H. SHANLEY, Successor to D. McDonald, 

Oregon street, below Front, Ban Francisco. 

All Sorts of Steam Boilers Made to Order 
and Repaired. 

Also, all kinds of Sheet Iron Work done promptly, 
and at priceB to suit the times. Iv27 



AVERILL'S 
OJHLEMICAL PAINT 

Of any desired Shade or Color, 
Mixed ready for application, and sold by the gallon 

It Is Cheaper, Handsomer, more Durable and Elastic 
than the best of any other Paint. 

Office, corner Fourth and Tovraaend streets, San 
Francisco. Send for sample card and price list, 

16v28-8meowbp HEALY k JEWELL, Agents. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK, 

Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, Janu- 
ary 20th, 1873. 
iifau OFFIOE, HI OKNBva. 

CAPITAL. TWO MILLION DOLLARS 

SUBSCBIBED.— OSE-O^TAIOTB PAID UP. 

PRESIDENT HENRY HENTSCH. 

SAN FRAN0IS00 BRANCH, 

-iKS TO MESSRS. HENTSCH k BEI'.TON, 
527 CLAY STREET. 8. F. 
D ireotors : 
FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT WATT. 

Thla Hank is prepared to grant Letters of ('p -lit on 
Eurnnc, anil to transact every kind 01 Banking. Mircriniilc 
and Exchange Bnalnm, >ind tonegotiaU) American Securi- 
ties in Europe. Dopoititi received. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON: 

Hew York. Ham intra-. Wlotarthux, Baden, 

Liverpool. Bcllln/.ona, Bern, Cbur, 

London, Hi- rim. Nenchatrl, Shall nan --• n, 

Pari*, Krankiorl, Locarno, Fribuurg, 

l ■ ■■■ n Gt-neva, t'haux-de- Lucotd, 

Bordeaui. Zurich, Foods, Aaron, 

Mar»cilU'9, Ba-vl. Solutlmrii. Lugano, 

Brussels, Si. Gall, LauH&noe, MendrUlo. 

-Vii Assay Office 

Is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz, 
oreiHH't sulphur*- U". Keiurus iu coin or barH.at the option 
of the depositor. Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust nnd bullion can be forwarded fmm any part of the 
country, and rt- turns made ihrutigh Wells, Fargo A Go., or 
by checks. Iv27-3m 



BROWN'S PATENT LAMP. 




One of these Lamps, ■when placed at a distance of 200 
feet from the bank, will light up a hank surface 260 feet 
in length and 160 feet high, and to a much better ad- 
vantage than any other light heretofore tried, and at an 
expense not to exceed five cents per hour. Lamps 
furnished at short notice. 

Letter of Recommendation. 

Me. C. B. Bbown— Sir : Your Patent Lamp for light- 
ing hydraulic mines, which you sold to me In December 
last, has given entire satisfaction, and far exceeds my 
expectations, and I think it the best and cheapest light 
ever used to light mining claims by night, and am sat- 
isfied that I have saved three hundred dollars by the 
use of it in the laBt mining season over pitch or any 
other light of the same brilliancy; and I will also Bay 
that if I could not get another lamp, five hundred dol- 
lars would not buy it. Yours, 

W. D. APLTN. 

Little York, Nov. 5, 1872. 

For further particulars, address, 

fe22-tf C. B. BROWN, Flacerville, Cal. 

P. J. PHILLIPS & CO., No. 008 Clay street, near 
Montgomery, San Francisco, are agents for Brown's 
Lamp, where it may be seen. 



The California Powder Works 

No. 311 CAI.TFOBM1 STREET, 

. SAN FRANCISCO. 
Manufacturers and have constantly on hand 
SPORTING, 

MIISXNG, 

A-na B1L.A. TING 

POWDER, 

Of SUPERIOR QUALOT, FRESH FEOM THE 
MTTJ18. It being constantly received and transported 
into the Interior, is delivered to the consumer within a 
few days of the time of its manufacture, and is iu every 
way superior to any other Powder in Market. 

We have been awarded successively 

Three Gold Medals 

By the MECHANICS' INSTITUTE and the STATE AG- 
RICULTURAL SOCIETY for the superiority of oni 
products over all others. 
We also call attention to our 

HEROTJLES POWDER. 

Which combines all the force of other Btrong explosive 
now in use, and the lifting force of the best blasting 
powdeb, thus making it vastly superior to any other 
pompound now in ubo, 

A circular containing a full description of thiB Pow- 
der can be obtained on application to our Office. 



16v20-3m 



JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

Froiseth's New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

THAI* OF UTAH. 

Size, 40 by 66 Inches ; Scale, 8 Miles to an Inch. 

Handsomely engraved on stone, colored in counties, 
and mounted on cloth, showing the Counties, Towns, 
Rivers, Lakes, Railroads, Mines and Mining Districts 
throughout the Territory, and all Government Surveys 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8; Pocket form, $5, 
Mailed to any part of the United States, on receipt of 
price, by A. L.BANCROFT k CO., 721 Market street, 
San FranciBCO, Cal., or by B. A. M. FROISETH, Pub- 
lisher, Salt Lake City, Utah. 10v25-tf 



Directory. 



Menzo Spring— Manufacturer of the Dr. 

Blv Artificial Limbs, baa removed from 101 JVsafe street 
t" 166 Tftram.t Mreat. near northeast corner of Ttiird and 
Toh a ma, and betv>e«n Howard and Folsoin streets. Ad- 
flMH Mt-n/o S|>rinK, 16b Tehama at,, ban Francisco. Cal. 



4^^fc OR AIKIN »* Kearny at.. N. E. oor. Call- 

^P«fM un. HII\in, fornia st..S.K.,cnrc!il-aUrrh. 

^T ^V Deafness, Ear binchai-icvF. Deloi aiitke, and 

^B |^r nil Kyi'. F..ir. I.unn, Liver. Kidney, Blood, Nervt-. 

^ y 1 hr>>nic, Snecialand Mcn'n Diseases. Friendly 

W advice; skilnul tieatnum (or all invalids. 

▼ Mcdk-lno» Mii'plted. Honm. Iu to * and 6 to 8. 

Call or. write. Ladies, married or siuifle, spi-edlly cured of 

any ill health. VMS 



H. C. BENNETT, 
fSTATISTZOIA.IV. 

Reports and estimates made about all departments of 
Production, Commerce, and Manufacture, of the Pacific 
Coast. 5v?4-lf 



RICHARD H. STRETCH, Civil Engineer, 

City and County Surveyor. 

Office— Room 16, city Hall. llv'24-Jm 

OtLEI O. OttiV. JUfU M. BATIK. 

GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW, 

In Building of Paclfle Insurance Co., N. B. corner Cati> 

'urn 1,1 an Leldesdorfl streets, 

say prancico. 



JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Montgomery Street, 
a . W. corner Sacramento. 



»'«. BABTLISQ. HSHHT KIMBALL. 

BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBIrVr>ER,S f 

Paper Balers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

G05 Clay atreet, (southwest cor. Sanaome), 
16vl2-3m BAN FRANCISCO. 



PmiCHASKBB please say advertised in Scientific PreBs. 



J. F. PAGES, 

S E A. L E IV G K -A. V E R , 
AJilt J. I 1 TKIt CUTTEK. 

Brass sad Steel Stamps and Dies, 008 Sacramento street, 
San Francisco. Orders by express promptly attended to. 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 

PATTERNS AND MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Qarratt'B Brass Foundry). 

N. V7. corner Natoma and Fremont streets, 8. F. En- 
trance on Natoma stroet. tiv"23-iJm 



San Francisco Cordage Company. 

Established 1856- 
Wt have lu-t added a large amount of new machinery of 
he latest and most improved lcind, and are again prepared 
ofill orders tor Rope ot any special lengths nnd sizes. Con- 
stantly on hand a large stock ot" Manila Rope, all sizes; 
Tarred Manila Rone ; Hay Rope ; Whale Iiine, etc., etc. 
TUBBS & CO., 
17v26-tf 611 and C13 Front street, San Francisco. 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

LEVI STEVENS President. 

H.N. VAN BKUNT Cashier. 

BANKING HOUSE. 

No. 415 California street, San Francisco. 
a5v20-qv 

DR. ABORN, 
Physician and Operating Surgeon 

FOB, CHRONIC DISEASES, 
213 GEABY STBEET, - - • SAN FBANCISCO. 
Diseases of a chronic and obstinate character, espec- 
ially such cases as have for years, or a lifetime, resisted 
the ordinary modes of treatment, are the class of mala- 
dies in the treatment of which Dr. Ahorn has become 
pre-eminent on the Pacific CoaBt, aB well an throughout 
the Union, and by his success has acchieved for him- 
self an enviable reputation. 23v25-ly 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STEEL FE3STS- 
Sold bynllPcalerB throughout tlie World. 



I9t26-ly 



CHARLES F. KIBCHNEE, 

Sampler and Crusher of Ores, 

NO. 11 DRUMM STREET, 

San Francisco. 



PATRICK GIBBONS, 

Sole Proprietor for the Pacific States and Territories, of 
VAN PAPPELENDAM'S PATENT 

Metallic Roofing and Wall Tiles, 

(Patented Jnne 13th, 1871.) 

San Fbanoibco Office— At MessrB. Tranok a: Knox, 
513 California Btreet. 

Residence— 308 Tenth Btreet, Oakland, Cal. jn21.3m 



28 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



(Continued from Page 31.) 
1300-ft level, and the Btatlon is opened (or a drift north 
into the level. 

Abizona and Utah.— The main shaft of the Arizona 
and Utah is down 350 It. and an incline is being sunk on 
the ledge in the main east tunnel, which is passing 
through quartz, with occasional spots of good ore. 

Globe. — Arrangements have been made to prospect 
the Globe mine through the Arizona and Utah. 

Nevada. — The new shaft of the Nevada mine is 
progressing well, G ft. being added to its depth last 
week. The rock is hard, but works well. 

Baltio Cons.— The tunnel of the Baltic Cons, is going 
ahead well, and yesterday some pieces of ore were found 
assaying from $18 to $25 per ton. Another shift of 
men will be put to work nest Monday. 

TrLEB.— The Tyler shaft, 150 ft. deep, is having the 
water pumped out of it, and next Monday sinking will 
be resumed for the ledge. 

Crown PorNT Ex.— The sinking of the large new 
working 6hafts of the Crown Point Extension and the 
Lower ComBtoek progresses at a very energetic and sat- 
isfactory rate. 

Lady Washington. — The hoisting works of the Lady 
Washington are nearly completed, building and all. 
The same may be said of the Daney. 
p Green, — The old shaft of the Green mine is cleared out 
and retimbered down to the incline, which shows signs 
of having caved to some little extent. As soon as this 
can be cleared out and retimbered, drifting for the ledge 
will be commenced at once. 

Pictou.— The main tunnel of the Pictou is being driv- 
en ahead with characteristic energy. 

Jacob Little. — Good ore in the second crosscut, 
which assays from $50 to $350 per ton. 

Yellow Jacket, — Drifting both north and south at the 
1400-ft., and 1500-ft. levels, develops only excellent in- 
dications as yet. 

Feanklin. — Are making about 5 ft. per day in the 
main drift, and are thought to be very near the ledge. 

VtrLTUHE,— The main shaft is down 30 ft. The whole 
shaft is now quartz, in which occur frequent bunches 
of ore of a very high grade. The general prospect for 
soon striking a body of solid ore is extremely encourag- 
ing. Sinking is progressing rapidly. 

Aladdin. — Now down 134ft., and still sinking. 
There Is no change to note at this time. The prospects 
continue good. 

Portland. — The connection between the new shaft 
and the old works, perfected some two weeks ago at a 
depth of 200 ft. having ventilated the mine thoroughly, 
work is now progressing rapidly. Working 17 men, and 
much larger amounts of ore from the stopes than ever 
before. 

The Washington and Creole Mine. — Shipped last 
Monday ,$6,956.97, and will ship the coming week about 
$7,500. The bullion produced for the last three weeks 
has been steadily increasing, and from present indica- 
tions the percentage of increase seems likely to con- 
tinue. The results of two bars melted and assayed 
yielded respectively 1300 and 1399 ozs., of which $448.10 
was gold — a percentage of over 12J$ of gold in the bul- 
1 ion product. mc..^. 

•t*: Arizona. 

YAVAPAI COUNTY- 

Arizona Miner, June 21: Prospecting in Walnut Grove 
District is being carried on with very promising re- 
sults, and indications show that this will soon become 
a very extensive mining district. There is always an 
abundance of water. 

War Eagle. — Jackson & Co. have got down to within 
5 ft. of good pay ore in this mine, and their reduction- 
works are grinding out and saving considerable gold. 

Cobnticopia.— The developments in this mine how as 
large deposit of very rich decomposed ore. 

Idaho. 

Red Warrior. — Idaho Statesman, June 28: On Tues- 
day last, Hon. John McNally concluded the crushing of 
some thirty tons of ore, which yielded about $963. Yes- 
terday he made a clean-up. from 22 7-2000 tons of Wide 
West ore, with the following result: 128 4-16 ounces of 
gold; coin value, $1,795.50, which would be at the rate 
of $81.60 in "coin per ton. He has about 100 tons more 
of ore to crush for himself and others, at Red Warrior, 
which he will keep pounding" away at until it is re- 
duced, that is very rich, and is estimated will yield 
from $6,000 to $10,000, and there is plenty more of the 
same kind to be had. 

The Pittsburgh and Idaho G. M. Co. have about sur- 
mounted all the obstacles in the way of* their hoisting 
works, and will now soon be taking out ore from their 
niinejthelda Ellmore. Hon. A. E.Huffaker haB been 
appointed foreman of this mine. 

Capt. G. F. Settle & Co. made their first clean-up yes- 
terday, of some 30 tons of ore from the ViBhun. It is 
believed they will have between $4,000 and $5,000, and 
that there is $10,000. 

W. P. Callahan, Esq., in connection with his brother, 
and Mr. Stephen William, have commenced to crush on 
some 40 or 50 tons of ore, taken from the Eureka, that 
is very rich and will pay over $100 to the ton. 

Montana. 

Notes.— Deer Lodge City Independent, June 21st, says; 
The old Harris mine, in Jefferson gulch is being worked 
with plenty water and will clean up a large amount of 
dust during the season. 

ClaimB in California gulch are paying $20 per day to 
the hand, with plenty of ore ahead. 

American gulch is being worked by McConnell & Co., 
and are making large clean-ups. 

Seaton & Co., at the mouth of Washington gulchhave 
7 ft. of pay gravel, and all the water they can use; 
ground pays well and plenty of it to work. Farther up 
the gulch, Brown & Co. and Bugginfe Co. are doing well. 
Joe Parmantel, next above, is ground-sluicing; pay on 
bed rock is unusually good. 

Highland gulch is being worked by 3 companies 
with fliues with good prospects of success. 

Oregon. 

The Ochoco Mines.— State Journal, June 28: The lat- 
est and moBt reliable information we have from thiB 
new mining camp is not veiy encouraging. Mr. George 
Milligan, well known in this county, writes to his 
friends not to he in a hurry in starting for the mines. 
He has been to the new camp, and thinks the prospeot 
is not very flattering. 

Utah. 

City Creek Mines.— Salt Lake Journal, June 28: The 
late discoveries made in City Creek Canon are extending 
further than waB at first anticipated. A new discovery, 
and one of importance is that made by MeBsrs Houtz 
and Sirine, two days ago near the mouth of North Mill 
Creek Canon. He ia now in town purchasing provisions 
and material to send up to the new location, and work 
will be commenced upon it right away. The same char- 
acter of ore as that found in the City Creek mines — 
galena — is found to exist in abundance at the mouth of 
North Mill Creek Canon, and a rush of miners to that 
section is n w taking place. 

The iron mine, near the site of Modoc city, owned by 
N. P. Woods, is being worked steadily, and yesterday 
ten tons of ore were taken out and placed on the dump, 
The last assay Bhowed G6 percent, of Iron, but the ore 
now being taken out is much better, and will show a 
much greater percentage of iron. 

Mr. Reamer has located another claim within 150 ft. of 
the mine abeve mentioned, and its development will 
commence immediately. The indications show a vein 
of rich galena. 

Prospecting in this camp is attended with more 
trouble than elsewhere, owing to the thick brush 
through which prospectors have to sometimes cut their 
way, and the search for claims has to be conducted 
with much difficulty. Still the work goes on, and pros- 
pectors from the city are daily reinforcing those already 
in the canon. 



Mining and Other Comranies. 



Owing to the time necessary to mail the present large edition of the 
if. <J- S. Press, we are obliged to go to press on Thursday even- 
ing— which is the very latest hour we can receive udtertisements. 



Angels Quartz Mining Company— Princi- 
pal place of business, 408 California street, San 
Francisco. Location of works: Angels Mining Dis- 
trict, Calaveras County, California. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 35), 
levied March 4th, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

TDMathewson 3 300 $450 Oo 

TDMathewson 4 314 47100 

TDMathewson 5 500 750 00 

TDMathewson 17 26 39 00 

T D Mathewson (not issued) 325 5-7 488 57 

J H Fish (not issued) 342 6-7 574 29 

J H Fish, Trustee 20 50 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 21 £0 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 22 60 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 23 50 75 00 

Mrs EBFish 9 1000 1500 00 

RMAnthony 18 100 150 00 

R M Anthony. . . (not issued) 45 5-7 68 57 

RM Anthony 19 60 90 00 

EHSawyer 11 800 1200 00 

E H Sawyer .... (not issued) 228 4-7 342 86 

Geo. Osgood 12 400 600 00 

Geo. Osgood (not issued) 114 2-7 171 43 

And in accordance with law and an order made by 
the Board of Directors, on the 4th day of March, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
Maurice Dore & Co., 327 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., on Monday, April 21st, 1873, at 2 o'clock 
p. m., of such day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 1, 408 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California (up stairs). a5-3t 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company . 
The above sale is hereby postponed for thirty days, at 
the same hour and place. 

apl9 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale is hereby postponed until Wednesday. 
June 18, 1873, at the same hour and place. 

ml7 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.—Angela Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale ib hereby postponed until Wednesday, July 
16, 1373, at the same hour and place. 

jl4 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

Beckwith Mining Company— Location of 

works, Ely Mining District', Lincoln county, State of 

-Nevada. Principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 1th day of July, 1*7:!, an assessment 
of fifteen (151 cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable Immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of tlie Com- 
pany, rooms 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on Monday, the Uth day of August, 1873, 
will be deemed delinquent and advertised for Bale at pub- 
lic auction, and unless payment is made before, will 
be sold on Tuesday, the 2d day of September, 1873, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Directors. WM, H. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office, Rooms 5 and 6, No, 302 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. jyo-td 



Bunker Hill Quartz Mining Company— Lo- 
cation of works: Amador, Amador County, California. 
Principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. • 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described Btock on accountof assessment, (No. 10)levied 
June 5th, 1873, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Wales L Palmer 113 20 $200 00 

Wales L Palmer 120 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 121 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 122 20 200 Oo 

Wales L Palmer 124 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 125 20 200 00 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made Juno 5th, 1873, so many Bh ares of each 
parcel of said stock as may be necessary will be sold at 
public auction, at the office of the company, No. 19 First 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on Monday, July 28th, 1S73, 
at 12 o'clock noon of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

WALES L. PALMER, Secretary. 
Office— No. 19 First St., San Francisco, Cal. jyl9 



The California Beet Sugar Co. — Loca- 
tion of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of Works : Alvarado, Alameda 
County, California. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 2Gth day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the nameB of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 
Name. No. Certificate, No. Shares. Amount. 

W. T. Garratt 2 125 $1250 

W.T.Garratt 40 03 C30 

Ephraim Dyer 6 63 630 

Epbraim Dyer 39 62 620 

H.G.Rollins 9 63 630 

H. G. Rollins 35 25 250 

H.G.Rollins 36 12 120 

Wm. B.Carr 23 250 2500 

Wm.B. Carr 62 38 380 

E.H.Dyer 27 5 50 

E. H. Dyer 71 245 2450 

Austin D. Moore 60 50 500 

T. G.Phelps 68 53 530 

And in accordance with law and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each pareel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the company, No. 314 California 6treet, San Francisco, 
California, on Tuesday the 22d day of July, 1873, at 12 
o'clock noon of said day, to pay said delinquent assess 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising 'and 
expenses of sale. 

LOUIS FRANCONI, Secretary. 
Office, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Central Land Company— Location of 

office and principal place of business. No. 338 Mont- 
gomery street, Room 5, San Francisco, California. 
Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of Assessment levied on the 
ninth day of June, 1873, the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the repective shareholders as fol- 
lows. 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

PL Weaver (Executor, 37 150 $187 50 

Edward McLean, and F Warner.36 100 125 00 

FBHaswell 35 100 125 00 

F BHaswell 34 li 125 00 

F B Haswell 33 100 125 00 

F B Haswell 30 50 62 50 

FBHaBwell ; 29 60 62 50 

Edward McLean 12 50 62 50 

Edward McLean 11 50 62 60 

Edward McLean 10 50 62 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 



Board of Directors, made on the 9th day of June, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, by the Secre- 
tary, at the said Room 5, 338 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California, on the 28th- day of July, 1873, at 
the hour of 2 o'clock p. m. of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

F. B. HASWELL, Secretary. 
Office, No. 338 California Btreet, Room 5, Sah Fran- 
cisco, Cal. jyl2 



Dutch Flat Blue Gravel Mining Company. 

Place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 2j levied 
on the 13th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Booth.LA 13 2000 $1000 

Booth, LA 14 1000 5C0 

Booth.LA 15 1000 500 

Cope, G W, Trustee 67 100 50 

Cope, G W, Trustee 68 100 50 

Cope, G W, Trustee 69 100 60 

Cope, G W, Trustee 70 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 37 500 250 

Dorsey.EB 42 200 100 

Dorsey.EB 43 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 44 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 45 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 46 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 47 100 50 

Fry, JD 17 600 250 

Forbes, Alex, Trustee. . . .52 2000 1000 

Gashwiler.JW 36 800 400 

Heydenfeldt, S 16 2000 1000 

Haggin, JB 5 1000 500 

Haggin.'JB 6 1000 500 

Roberts,GD 18 500 250 

Roberts, G D 20 1000 500 

Roberts, G D 21 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 22 1000 500 

Roberts, G D 25 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 26 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 27 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 28 1000 500 

Roberts, GD -. 29 1000 500 

Raymond, W H 3 1000 500 

Raymond, W H 4 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.32 1000 600 

Richardson, EA, Trustee.33 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.34 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, TruBtee.35 1000 600- 

Richardson, EA, Trustee.49 500 250 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. 50 200 100 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. 51 100 50 

Richardson, E A, TruBtee.54 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.55 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Tru6tee.66 1000 600 

Taylor, H W 60 180 90 

Taylor, H W 61 20 10 

Taylor, H W 64 500 250 

Whitcomb, OA 63 100 50 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the 13th day of May, 1873, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at the office of the company, 
room 11, 401 California street, San Francisco, Cal , on 
Monday, the_14th day of July, 1873, at the hour of 12 
o'clock m. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of Bale. W. M. HELMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 401 California street, San Fran- 
Cisco, Cal. jn28 



Equitable Tunnel and Mining Company, 

Location of workB, Little Cottonwood District, Utah Ter- 
ritory. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the fifth day of May, 1B73, an assess- 
ment (No. 2) often cents per share was levied upun the 
capital Btock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold nnd silver coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 35 New Merchants' Exchange. 
Any slock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the tenth day of June, 1873, will be delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on the thirtieth day of June, 
1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses ol sale. By order or the Direc- 
tors. CHARLES S. HEALY. Secrelary. 

Office, No. 35 New Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco 
CaL 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming stock delin 
quent on the above assessment is hereby postponed unti 
Wednesday, July 2d, 1873, and the sale thereof until Tues- 
day, the 22d day of July, 1873. By order of the Board of 
Directors. CHAS. S. HEALY, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming stock delin- 
quent on the above assessment is hereby postponed until 
Thursday, July 17, 1873, and the sale therof until Friday, 
August 8th, 1873. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. S. HuALY. Secretary. 



Frear Stone Company of California— Lo- 
cation of worka and principal place of business, City 
and County of San Francisco, State of Calif orna. 
Notice,— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment, No. 6, levied 
on the 27th day of May, 1S73, the several amounts Set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares, Amount. 

Booth, Lucius A 11 405 $810 

Booth, Lucius A 12 45 90 

Coleman, John W 54 400 800 

Cornell, ME 110 20 40 

Dam, G W 99 10 20 

Dam, G W 107 6 10 

Emery, J S 34 460 900 

Spaulding, N W 16 405 810 

Spaulding, N W 16 45 90 

Spaulding, N W 19 405 810 

Spaulding, N W ; . . 20 • 45 90 

Syer, Robert 95 50 100 

Tripp.E 41 8 16 

Wegener, R, Trustee 65 5 10 

Wegener, R, Trustee 72 11 22 

Wegener, R, Trustee 73 34 68 

Wegener, R, Trustee 76 60 100 

Wegener, R, Trustee 90 250 500 

And . in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 27th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said Stock as maybe 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
he C ompany, No. 414 California street, San FranciBco, 
California, on Monday the 21st day of July, 1S73, at the 
hour of one o'clock P. M., of said day, to pay said de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sal e. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 
Office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 



Great Blue Gravel Range—Location of 

Works, Placer County, State of California. 

Notice ia hereby given, that at a meeting 01" the Board of 
Directors of said Company, held on the l'ith day of June, 
1873, an assessment (No. 3) of ten (10) cents per share was 
levied upon the capital slock of said Company, payable 
immediately, in gold coin of the United .states, to the 
Secretary at his office, Room 5 and 6, No. 302 M'>ntgomfiry 
street, San Francisco, California. Any stuck upon which 
said assessment shall remain unpaid on Monday, the Uth 
day of July, 1S73, shall be deemed delinquent, 
and will be duly advertised for sale at pub- 
lic auction, and unless payment sl.nl l be made 
before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 5th day 1 f August, 
1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Directors. WM. H. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office, Room 5 and C, No. 302 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. Cal. jiJ-dis 



Globe Mining Company — Location of 

works, Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors held on the vd day of July, 1873, an assessment 
(Ho. 3) of seventy-live cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the Corporation, payable immediately, in 
United States gold com. to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company. Room No. 26 Hay ward's Bui'dine, No. 419 
California street, San Francisco, Cal. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain nnpaid on the 4th day 
°I Au S, ust * 1873 > will he delinquent and advertised for Mile 
at public auction, and, unless payment is made before, will 
be sold on the 25th day of August, 1873, to pay the delin- 
quent aBse-sment, together wnh costs of advertisinc and 
expenses ol" sale. By order of the Directors 

r,- „ JOSEPH MAGUIRE, Secretary. 

Office, Room 26, Hayward's Building, No. 419 California 
street. San Francisco, Cal . j y 5 



Hasloe Mill and Mining Company — Prin- 
cipal place of business, No. 408 California street, San 
Francisco. Location of works: Mariposa County, 
California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 14th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Q B Dieferrari 3 10 $ 6 00 

WmD fiiggins 74 50 25 00 

TV Julian 71 10 5 CO 

"WmHFMinnie 25 60 25 00 

Margaret Kagsdale 44 50 K „, ) n 7 sn 

Margaret Kagsdale 45 25 Dal J 2 5U • 

C Irving Smith 52 10 5 00 

CIrvingSmith 53 10 5 00 

CHRobertS 57 25 12 50 

CHRoberts 58 25 12 50 

G W Woods 47 20 10 00 

WHThomas 10 -X 5 00 

W H Thomas 24 15 7 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 14th day of May, 1873, so 
many shares of each parcel of |such stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No. 408 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on Monday, the 21st day of July, 1873, at 
the hour of 1 o'clock P. ai., of said day, to pay said de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of ad- 
vertising »nd expenses of the sale. 

J. "W. TRIPP, Secretary. 
Office — 408 Oalfornia street, up stairs, San Francisco 
California. jy-6 



Heckerdorn Gold and Silver Mining Com- 
pany. Principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Looation of works, Blue Mountain Dis- 
trict, Calaveras County, Cal. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 

described stock, on account of assessment levied on the 

9th day of June, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 

the names of the respective shareholders, as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Louis Reiff 174 400 $100 00 

FrankLyon.. 156 40 10 00 

iBidoreLyon 168 20 6 00 

Berson 161 100 25 00 

Monin 157 100 25 00 

A Mayer 161 100 25 00 

Hanson 119 60 15 00 

Sawyeur * 93,107,150, 840 210 00 

Hoag 149, 146, 1000 200 00 

Louis, NT 201 800 200 00 

Louis, NY 209 1U0 25 00 

Louis, NY 157 400 100 00 

LouiB, NY 158 400 100 00 

Saintat 169 20 6 00 

Saintat , 94 20 5 00 

Saintat 95 20 5 00 

Saintat 96 20 5 00 

Saintat 97 20 6 00 

Caterine, NY 136 100 25 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 9th day of June, 
1873, so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office 
of the Secretary, No. 734 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California, on the 28th day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock m. of Baid day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of jidvertising 
and expenses of sale. 

LOUIS TERME, Secretary. 
Office, 734 Montgomery street, San Francisco Cali- 
fornia. jyl2 



Lady Esten Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of business^ No. 35 New Merchants' Ex- 
change, Wan Francisco, California. Location, of works. 
Little Cottonwood District, Utah Territory. 
Notice Is hereby g iven, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on thellthdayof June, 1873, an assessment 
(No. 3) ot five cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, No. 35 New Merchants' 
Exchange, San Francisco, Ual, Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain unpaid on the ITiii day of July, 
1873, will be delinquent, and advertised lor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment is made before, will be sold 
on Wednesday, the 6th day of August, 187a, to pay the de- 
linquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of Bale. CHAS. S. HEALY, Secretary. 

Office, 35 New Merchants' Exchange, California street, 
San Francisco, California. jlj 



Lady Franklin Gold and Silver Mining Co. 

Principal place of business, City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. Location of works, Shver 
Mouutaln Mining District, Alpine County. California. 
Notice ia hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the lBt day of July, 1873, an assessment 
of fifty cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable Immediately, in United States gold 
and silver coin, to the Secretary, at his office, 507 Montgom- 
erv street, San Fran Ibco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 15th day of August, 1873. will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on Monday, the 15th day of Sep- 
tember, 1873. to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenscB of Bale. 

J. S. LUTY, Secretary. 
Office— 507 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 
jy!9 



Manhattan Marble Company of Califor- 

nia— Principal place of business, San Francisco. Loca- 
tion of works, Oakland, Cal. 

Noiiee is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Directors, held on the 23d day of June, 1873, an assess- 
ment of one dollar per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, 319 Pine street, San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 24th day of July, 1873, will bB delinquent, and 
■■ rjvertised tor sale at public auction, and unless payment 
.-made before, will be sold on Monday, the 11th day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together' 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

D. M. BOKEE, Secretary. 
Office, 319 Pine St.. S. F., Oal. 



Orient Silver Mining Company- Location 

of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. 
Location of works, Ely Mining District, Lincoln County, 
Nevada. . , *■ 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Direct- 
ors, held on the Uth day of June, 1873, an assessment (No. 
2) of Ten Cents per Bhare was levied upon the capital Btock 
of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United States 
gold coin, to the Secretary^ at the office of the Company, 
Room No. 26, Hayward's Building, No. 419 California street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the !9th day of July, 1873, will be delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at publie auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Monday, the 11th day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH MAGUIRE, Secretary. 
Office, Room No. 2G, Hayward's Building, No. 4191-idi- 
fornta street, San Francisco. California. jlf> 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



29 



Newton Booth Consolidated Mining Com- 

pany. — Location of principal place f l-u.-iin:-.-. Ban 

Franciac", California. Location of works, Ely HI 11 

ing District, Line ] *Ja. 

N ■ , 1 1 h- - — There are deUnqtunl ui^ti th... following 
deiicribeJ Block, on account of b**j 
I ho seventh day of May,l»7a, the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the respective sliarch<>M< t~, a 
follows: 

Names. N . CcrttAcat*. No. Shares Amount. 

TCampli-11, Tru»Uo U l'»l $50 OU 

TCan.i it 15 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee U 100 60 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 17 10U 

T Campbell. Trustee lrt 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Tronic* IS 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 30 100 

T Campbell. Troatee 'Jl l't" 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee. 1! 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 'ii 100 50 00 

pi „ 11, Trustee 21 101) 50 00 

T Caurpbell, Truateo 26 100 .'out 

pbell, Trustee 20 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee in 100 50 00 

T Campbell. Trus'ee 35 100 50 00 

T OampbeU, Trustee 81 100 .",0 no 

T Campbell, Trustee 38 100 50 00 

pbail, Trustee 89 100 ."^i »hi 

l>ell, Trustee 10 100 50 00 

ITBabeox 41 50 WOO 

JTBabcox ti 25 I9 60 

JTBabcol 4:i 25 IS 

TCampboll 45 50 25 no 

TCampbcll 40 50 25 00 

T Campbell 47 50 25U0 

T Campbell 48 50 25110 

TCampbcll 4'J 50 26 00 

T Campbell 50 60 25 00 

T OampbeU 51 60 26 00 

T Campbell 52 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 53 60 26 00 

TCampbcll 57 25 12 60 

T Campbell 68 25 12 50 

TCawpbell 69 50 25 00 

T Campbell 00 100 60 00 

T Campbell 61 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 69 100 60 00 

T Campbell 03 100 50 00 

T Campbell .".64 100 60 00 

TCampbcll 65 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 66 100 50 O0 

T Campbell 67 100 60 00 

TCampbcll 08 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 69 100 5c 

TCampbcll 70 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 71 100 60 00 

TCampbcll 72 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 73 100 50 00 

TCampboll 74 100 50 00 

T Campbell 76 100 50 00 

TCampboll 70 100 60 00 

T 1 ami, bell 77 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 78 100 50 HO 

T Campbell 79 50 25 00 

TCampboll 80 50 25 00 

TCampboll 81 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 82 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 83 60 25 00 

TCampboll .84 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 85 50 25 00 

T Campbell 86 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 87 60 25 00 

TCampbcll 88 50 26 00 

TCampboll 89 50 26 00 

TCampboll 90 50 25 00 

TCampboll 91 60 25 00 

T Canipliell 02 50 25 00 

TCampboll 93 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 94 50 26 00 

TCampbcll 95 50 26 00 

TCampbcll 96 60 25 00 

T Campbell 97 50 25 00 

TCampbcll 98 60 25 00 

TCampboll 99 100 50 00 

TCampboll 100 100 50 00 

TCampboll 101 100 50 00 

T Campbell 102 100 50 00 

T Campbell 103 100 60 00 

T Campbell 104 100 50 00 

T Campbell 105 100 50 00 

TCampbcll 100 100 50 00 

TCampbell 107 100 50 00 

TCampboll 108 100 50 00 

JGCullon 113 44 22 00 

OHLagranuo Ill 134 217 00 

C T Hutchinson 116 434 217 00 

NHaniUton 117 217 108 50 

A H Butherford 119 650 325 00 

O T Huichiuson, Trustee 121 500 250 00 

C T Hutchinson, Trustee 122 500 250 00 

C T Hutchinson, Tru6toe 123 50 25 00 

JTEabcox 124 50 25 00 

James L DuBois 126 100 50 00 

Mrs TW Scott 126 100 50 00 

B Frank Clarke 127 50 25 00 

S J Baymond 128 25 12 50 

TWScott 129 60 25 00 

SFEUiott 131 100 50 00 

WPVoso 132 50 25 00 

TCampbell , 132 60 30 00 

MWinants 13G 100 50 00 

T Campbell, TruBtee 137 100 50 00 

AH Miller 138 600 300 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 139 200 100 00 

OCMiller 140 109 54 50 

Eob't F Scott, Trustee 141 1500 760 00 

TCampbell 142 144 72 00 

CIHutohinson 144 500 250 00 

James W Wright 145 100 50 00 

James TV Wright 146 100 . 50 00 

JameB W Wright 147 100 60 00 

JamosW Wright 148 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 149 100 60 00 

James W Wright 150 100 50 00 

James W Wright 151 100 50 00 

JomesW Wright 162 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 153 100 50 00 

JameB W Wright 154 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 155 100 50 00 

James W Wright 156 100 50 00 

JamesWWright 157 100 60 00 

JamesW Wright 158 100 50 00 

JameBW Wright 169 100 60 00 

T Campbell 160 135 07 50 

TCampbell 161 210 105 00 

WHHonderBon * 164 1000 500 00 

E Herringbi 166 100 50 00 

B Herringhi 167 100 50 00 

B Herringhi 168 100 - 50 00 

B Herringhi, Trustee 169 350 175 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., TruBtees.170 600 250 00 

E F Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 171 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees.172 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 173 500 250 00 

B F Sherwood & Co , Trustees.174 100 50 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., TruBtees.176 100 50 00 

BF Sherwood & Co., TruBtees. 176 100 60 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Truetees,177 100 60 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., Trustees. 178 200 100 00 

B F Sherwood & Co,, Truutees.179 100 50 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., TrusteeB.180 100 50 00 

B F Sherwood & Co., TrusteeB.181 78 39 00 

JameBWWright 182 383 19160 

K F Scott, Trustee 183 234 167 00 

E F Scott, Trustee 184 100 50 00 

B F Scott, Trustee 185 100 50 00 

T Campbell, Trustee.. 186 60 25 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 187 51) 25 00 

T Campbell, TruBtee 188 00 25 00 

T Campbell, Trustee 189 50 25 00 

BFSides 190 100 50 00 

BFSldes 191 100 50 00 



Names. 
W H Heu>l. I 



.ncato. No.Sbares. Amount. | 



.'.MB 

. . . U'3 
...191 
.195 



\v H Ueieleraon 

W H II. nd< rt u 197 

W 11 Henderson 198 

W H Ueiider* ,u J99 

MO 

W H Henderson HU 

11 

c, Smith. Trust*,:- 201 

Myron Angel. 306 

\V t Lamb 207 

9QJ 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

«tl 

1287 
192 
loo 
100 
50 

5618 



60 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
60 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
115 50 
613 50 

'■. 00 

50 00 

50 00 

25 00 

2.809 DO 



And in accordance with law, and an order of the 

Board of Lnr, , tor*, made on the 7th day of May, 1873, 
so many Bharcn of each parcel ,,r ml3 stock as may bo 
. will be sold at public auction, at the ollicc 
California Btreet, 8an Francis- 
co, California, on tho 12th day of July, 1*73, it the hour 
of 1 o'clock, p. at., of said day. to pay said delinquent 
attosBmoDt thereon, together with costs of advertising 
ami < \peiiso8 of sale. LOUIS FRANCONI, Secretary. 

Ollicc, No. 311 California street, San Francis 
forma, Juull 



Phenix Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of busin-sB, No. i'> New HerahantB 1 
i'. \cliiinK' 1 , B«n I- nueiioo, California, Location of 
work*, Alia Oily, Little Cottonwood District, Utah Ttrri- 
tou , 

Notice is hcn.by n'ven that at a mewling of the Board of 

DIrvotorH. held on the 2d day of Jiilv, 1873, tin UBesBment 

i .. oente per share waalovicd upon the capital etook 

uf tho corporation, payable hu moil lately in United S tut en 
gold an'' eflvorcoin. BO the Secretary, No. '33 Now Mcr- 
ohanfas' Exchange. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upuu wuk-h this assessment shall remain un- 
pald on tho 6th day of Aneuat, 1873, will be delinquent, and 
a0> iftiaad for sale at public auction, and, uule-s payment 
>b mndo hfiore, will bo mild mi Monday, tho 'J.'.tb ilav of 
August, itf73, to pay the delinquent asflo.«sn.em, together 
with cositttil advertising and OXpeoSfa "f sale. 

CH*S. 8. HEALY, Secretary. 

Office, No. J5 Now Merchants' Exchange. jy3-d«8 



Placer Gold Mining and Canal Company. 

Location of principal place ol business, San Francisco, 

California. Location uf worka. Pin cor County, Stato of 

California. 

Notice is hereby givon, that at a nicetlngof the Directors 
of said company, bold on tho eighth (8th) day of July, a. d. 
1871, an assessment of teu (10) ceri'B per tdiarc. wan levied 
upon the capital stuck Of the corporation, payablo immedi- 
ately, in United States Cold Coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 411 California street, San Fran- 
cisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 

f>a1d on Monday, the eleventh (llth) day of August. A. D. 
M73, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public 
auction, and, unless payment is made before, will be sold 
on Saturday, the thirtieth (30th J day of August, a. d. 1S73, 
to pay tho delinrpuent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and Bxpensee of sale. 

GE'>. W. It. KING, Secretary. 
Office- 411 California street, San Francisco, California. 
jyi9 



Regent Consolidated Mining Company- 
Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of works, Little Cottonwood 
District, Salt Lake County, Utah Territory. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed Stock, on account of assessment (No. l)leviedon 
the 26th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No, Shares. Amount. 

Allen, James M 4G 10 $1 00 

Allen, James M 48 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 50 10 100 

Allen, James M 51 10 100 

Allen, JnniesM 53 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 54 10 100 

Allen, James M 65 25 2 60 

Allen, James M 56 25 2 50 

Allen, James M 67 25 2 50 

Allen, James SI 58 25 2 50 

Allen, James M 59 50 6 00 

Allen, JameB M 60 50 5 00 

Allen, James M Gl 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 62 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 65 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 67 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 68 50 5 00 

Allen, James M CO 1000 100 00 

Allen, James M 73 50 5 00 

Allen, James IV1 74 60 5 00 

Allen, James M 75 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 77 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 170 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 172 250 25 00 

Allen, James M .' 182 250 25 00 

Allen. James M 183 250 " 25 00 

Allen, James M 185 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 187 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 100 250 25 00 

Allen, James 1.1 212 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 213 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 214 10 1 00 

Allen, JameBM 216 10 1 00 

Allen, James 1\I 217 10 1 00 

Allen, JamesM 219 lo 1 00 

Allen, James M 220 10 1 00 

Allen, James M , 222 100 10 q0 

Allen, James H 223 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 224 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 225 100 10 00 

Allen, JamesM 226 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 227 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 229 100 10 00 

Allen, JameB M 230 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 235 20 2 00 

Allen, JamesM 236 20 2 00 

Allen, JamesM 237 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 238 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 239 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 240 20 2 00 

Allen, JamesM 241 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 242 20 2 00 

Allen, JamesM 243 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 244 20 2 00 

Allen, JameB M .245 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 246 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 247 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 248 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 250 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 251 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 252 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 253 50 6 00 

Allen, James M 254 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 255 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 256 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 257 50 6 00 

Allen, JameB M 258 60 5 00 

Allen, James M 259 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 260 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 261 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 262 50 5 00 

Bessie, MB 264 50 6 00 

Chase, Dudley 322 250 25 00 

Fortune, HW 327 150 15 00 

Gates,MrsL 2G5 50 6 00 

Gates, George 2C6 25 2 50 

Gates, George 2G7 25 2 60 

Gates, George 268 25 2 50 

Gates, George 269 25 2 50 

Gates, George 270 25 2 50 

Gates, George 271 25 2 50 

Hinckley, George E ...... 154 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George 15 155 60 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 156 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 157 50 6 .00 

Hinckley, George E 165 50 5 00 



Hums, No. Ocrtifioato. No. Shares Amount 

■ E 167 50 5 00 

HiuckKy. George E ui 100 10 00 

Hinckley, George E 323 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George E i.-t jy 5 oo 

Hinckley. George E 325 60 5 00 

*"W 162 50 5 00 

Higgtar. . WW 27> afi 2 5u 

. W W 273 38 -2 B0 

- WW 374 BG 2 50 

Bfegiiu, ww 375 2fi 2 50 

WW 37fi 60 5 00 

WW 277 50 5 00 

Htggius.WW 278 50 6 00 

,WW 279 50 S 00 

Higgina.WW 282 6u BOO 

HigniUM.WW. 283 50 5 00 

HiKh.WH loo io 00 

Shannon, Luke 307 60 5 00 

Shannon, Mrs C A 308 40 4 00 

Thompson, KM 808 10 1 00 

\ U ■) OH , T J, Trustee 137 50 5 00 

Verdon, t i, Trustee 128 so 6 oo 

C J, Trustee l»i r» i 5 00 

1 | i ', T J, Trustee 130 50 5 00 

Wallaee,.] A, TrUBteo 310 60 5 00 

Wallace. J A, Trustee 811 100 10 00 

i A, TruBtee 314 100 10 00 

SV ftllao , J A, Trustee 316 Mil io 00 

Wallace, .1 \, Trustee 319 60 5 on 

Wallace. J A, Tnndec 320 50 5 60 

And to accordance with law, and an order of tho 
Board ol Directors, made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
so manyshares of each parcel of such stock as maybe 
.. will be sold at public auction, at the office 
of tho Company. No. YAH California street, San Francis- 
co, Cal., on Tuesday, tho 22d day of July, 1873, at tho 
hour of 12 o'clock, M., of said day, to pay delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

WM. L. UBTICK, Secretary. 
Office, 43H California street, San Frauciseo, California. 

Jy^ 

Spring Mountain Tunnel Company— Prin- 
cipal place of uualneua. No. 37 -New Merchants' Ex- 
change, California street, San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works, Ely Mining Dimricl, Lincoln Countv, Nevada 
Notice U hereby given, that at a meeting of the Bonrd 
of Director*, held on tho'20tli day ofJunc, 1873. an assess- 
ment (No. 6) of twenty cents per sliare was levied upon 
the capital stock uf the corporation, puvahlc imraediatt ly 
in united States itold and silver coin, lo the Secretary. 37 
Nflw Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stoi'k upun which t his assessment shall remain nn- 
patd on the 29th day of July, 1B73. will he delinquent, and 
advertised forsaU- atpnblic auction, and unless payment 
ifi made hefnre. will hu sold on Monday, the 18tfi day of 
August, 1873. to uay the delinquent aBseasnient, together 
with costs of advertising and expense.* of sale. By order 
of the Directors. J. M. BuVfiNGTON. Secretary. 

ufflce— 37 Nei\- Merchants' Exchange. California street, 
S_j.ii Fra ncisc o. Cal. jn28 

The Sanderson Gold Mining Company- 
Location of works. Railroad Flat, Calaveras County, 
California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Bonrcl of 

Dlrectorsof said Comjianv, held "n the'jOth day of Juno. 
1813, an assessment (No. 5) ot fifteen (15) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital slock ol' the corporation, puy- 
able immediately in United States gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary of said Company, at his office, in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Any stock upon which saidassossment shall remain un- 
paid on the 19th day of July, 1873, will be delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
shall bo made be-'ore, will be sold on Monday, the 4th day 
of August. 1873, to pay the delinquent asscssmentthereon, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

WILLIAM STUART. Secretary. 

Office, 113 Leidesdorfl' street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Silver Sprout Mining Company— Principal 

place of business, San Francisco, Stato of California. 

Location of works. Kear,-arge Mining District, Inyo 

county. State nt California. 

Notice is hereby given, lliat at ameetlng of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 3d day of June, IS7.'!, on assessment 
of Three Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the Corporation, payable iiiiniediatelv in United States 
gold coin, lo the Secretary, at the ottlce of the Company in 
San Francisco. Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the l. r >th day of July, 1873, will be delin- 
quent, and advertised lor -sub' at public auction. ar.d unless 
payment is made hf.fore, will be sold on Tuesday, the 12th 
day of August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
T. B. WJNCAltu, Secretary. 

Office. No. 317 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, j 4 

State of Maine Mill and Mining Company 

—Principal places of business, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Location of works: Amador County, California. 
Notioe. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 3) levied 
on the 23d day of May, 1873, the several amountB Bet 
opposite tho names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amounts. 

Jns M Allen, Truetee, 77 200 $ 10 00 

Jas M Allen, Trustee, 78 100 5 00 

Jas M Allen, Trustee, 79 100 5 00 

JMBufflngton 20 1000 50 00 

JMBnffington 6 600 30 00 

JM Bnilington 85 G6 3 30 

JM Buffington, Trustee,... 84 260 13 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 41 1000 50 00 

Piatt Buit, Trustee, 49 20 100 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 50 20 1 b0 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 51 20 1 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 66 50 2 50 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 57 50 2 50 

Chas Borthwick 72 50 2 50 

H B Congdon 35 20 100 

H B Congdon, TruBtee, 3(1 100 5 00 

HB Congdon 37 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 38 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 39 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee 40 500 25 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 73 50 2 50 

H B Congdon, Trustee 74 50 2 50 

H B Congdon, Trustees,.... 75 50 2 50 

P Dudley 76 500 25 00 

John Fay 2 1000 50 00 

John Fay 14 3000 150 00 

WmFaulkner 22 500 25 00 

Mrs M G Faulkner 10 100 5 00 

Mrs M G Faulkner 11 100 5 00 

V H Higgins 4 1000 50 00 

Jas L King 83 400 20 00 

SLMarks 12 240 12 00 

S L Marks 21 500 25 00 

A C Morse, Trustee 42 500 26 00 

A C Morse, Trustee, 43 500 25 00 

A Morse, Trustee, 44 100 5 00 

A Morse, Trustee 45 100 6 00 

A Morse, Trustee 46 100 6 00 

A Morse, Trustee, 48 100 6 00 

Mrs. P. E. Morse 80 100 5 00 

H. H. Beach 3 1000 50 00 

H. H. Beach 18 1000 50 00 

Mrs. Ella Btach 23 400 20 00 

Chas. B. Tilley 1 1634 8170 

"W.J. Tilley 61 1000 50 00 

L.N. Tower 28 100 6 00 

J. H. Whitman 5 1000 50 00 

J. H. "Whitman 15 2(500 130 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23d day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Secretary, 306 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California, on tho 21st day of July, 1873, at the hour of 
12 o'clock M., of said day, to pay the said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. H. B. CON&DON, Sec. 

Office, 306 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal, 



Stanislaus Water Company of California— 

Principal pl.ico of btntfness. ft'bt Kearny street, San Fran- 
cisco. Locfttkm of works, near La (iruuge, Stanislaus 
D 'iiutv. 

N - hercbj given, that at a meeting of the Board of 

Directors held on the lid day of July, 1873, on assu s anion t- 
CMo.J),) of two oenl - per anon na le* led upon the capital 
stock oj the Corporation, payable immediately in United 
Stat* gold coin, to i in- Seerotary, .'tfti Kearny si . Any stock 

upon which this aaBOBBmant shall remain unpaid on tho llUh 
day of Augubt, IST'J, will bo delinquent, and advertised fur 
sale at public am-tion, mul imli'st. payment is made before, 
will be sold ou Tuesday, the 26th day of August, 1kT3, to pay 
the delinquent anseiam ant, together with Boats ol adver- 
tising and expenses ol *alo. 

CLINTON 0, TRIPP, Secretary. 
UlViec, Ni.i, .Y.'ii Kearny btreet. Komii* 1 tuid 2, San l-'ran- 
i, MO . _^ jd J j y a 

Yule Gravel Mining Company— Location 

of workB: Viola Claims, Township No, 8, Placer 

County, California. 

Notice.— There is delimiuent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment, [No. 3} levied 
on (he 4th day of June, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 

Name*. No. Certificate. No.Sbares. Amount. 

Bakvr. Henry. , 363 20 $4 uo 

Bryant, A J 371) 5 i oo 

Cutter, 8 L 317 10 2 00 

dinners, John 420. 70 14 00 

Dore, Benj, Trustee t»5 50 10 00 

Dose, Benj, Trustee ..no 100 20 00 

Dore, Bonj, Trustee 114 flu 10 00 

Dore, Benj , Trustee 115 50 10 0(1 

Dore, Benj, Trustee 117 60 lo 00 

Dore, Benj, Trustee '237 100 20 00 

Gummer, WP 304 10 2 00 

Hynemann, 8, Trustee 382 20 4 00 

Higgins and Green, TruBtees.377 in 2 00 

Higgins, W L, Trustee 398 20 4 00 

Hill, John, Trustee 428 200 40 00 

Hull, QW 400 100 20 00 

Middle ton, S P 433 100 2ti oo 

Mclnernoy, MJ 406 155 31 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee 333 50 10 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee 390 10 2 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee 401 30 6 00 

Romer, J L, & Co., Trustees. .342 40 8 00 

Romer, J L. & Co., Trustees. .376 40 hi in 

Schmidell, H, Trustee 307 25 5 00 

Bchmldoll, H, Trustee 387 10 2 00 

Sears, Win H 319 25 5 09 

Voight, Dr C 386 40 8 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee lfi;i 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 106 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 172 50 10 00 

Wstsonj Wm H, Trmtee 182 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 183 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 189 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 196 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 199 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 250 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 257 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H. Trustee 258 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 260 100 20 00 

Lowenborg, 3, Trustee 437 50 10 09 

Lowenberg, 8, Truetee 438 50 10 00 

Logan and Edelcn, Trustee. . .399 20 4 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 4th day of June, 1873, 
bo many shares of each parcel of said stock ob may 
be necessary, will be Bold at public auction, at the 
office of the company, room 5 and 6, No, 302 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, California, on Tuesday, the 29th 
day of July, 1873, at the hour of 2 o'clock, p. m., of said 
day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of Bale. 

W. H. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery St., San 
Francisco, Cal. jyl2 

Commercial Coal Mining Company of San 

Francisco. Principal place of hnsinees^City and County 

of.San Francisco, State of California. Location of works, 

Santa Crux County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on tho 9th day of July, 1873, an assessment 
of Fifty Cents per ehare was levied upon the eamtal stock 
ol' the Corporation, payable immediately, in United States 
gold and silver coin, to ihi; Secretary, at No. 402; Montg ni- 
ery Street, room 23. Any stock upon which ihis assess- 
ment shallremain unpaid on the HJtli day of August, 1373, 
will be delinquent and advertised for .sale at public auction, 
and nnlesa payment is made before, will be sold on Mon- 
day the8th day of September, 1873. to pay tho delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

S. B. HANSON. Secretary. 

Office, No. 102 Montgomery street, room No. 23, San 
Francltco. . jy 12 



Mining 

Assessments 

and 

Delinquent Sales 

Advertised Daily 

in the 

Daily 

Mining Press 

at 

Lower Rates 

than in 

Any Other S. F. Daily. 

Send for blank forms (free) for adver 

tisements. 

It is both justice and economy for Min- 
ing Companies to patronize the only prac- 
tical mining publishers on this coast. 
DEWEY & CO., Publishers, 
No. 338 Montgomery St., S. F. 



I4IMTQ FflR "We will send on receipt of stamp tor 
riirciO rUll P03ta , g0t FREE, our 52-page Circular, 
containing 112 Illustrated Mechani- |M\/pK|TnRQ 
calMovements;adigestofPATENT •" ¥ *- n ■ "■■**■ 

LAWS ; information how to obtain patents, and about the 
rights and privileges of inventors and patentees; list of 
Goverment fees, practical hints etc., etc. AddresaDEWEY 
A OO.. Publishers and Patent Agents. San rancisoo 



A NEW BOOK ON MXNINGr. 

The Explorers', Miners' and Metallurgists' 

Companion; Comprising a Practical Exposition of thB 
Various Departments of Exploration, Mining, Engi- 
neering, Assaying, and Metallurgy, The Most Prac- 
tical and Comprehensive "Work on Mining Subjects 
Extant. Comprising 640 Pages, and 81 Engravings. 
By J. S. Phillips, M. E. Price, bound in cloth, $10 
(in coin) ; in leather $12. Forwarded by mail, in 
cloth, $11.40, currency; in leather, $13.75. Issued and 
for sale by Dewey & Co., Patent Agents and Pub lish 
ers Mining and Scientific Press. S. F. 

Patent Self-Operating Brake 

For Vehicles— Bimple, powerful, durable. Pronounced 
by competent judges to be justwhat isrequired. Rights 
for sale. MUNSON O. PICKETT, Patentee. 

Ne-ffbnryport, Mass., June 26, 1873, jy!2-4fc 



30 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



Machine Builders. 



ESTABLISHKD 18SX. 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

First and Fremont wtroots, 

SAN I'RAKOIHOO 

It A P. BAKKIN, A. P. BaATTOJ, 

GEO. W. FOQO, Superintendent. 

•steam Engines and Boilers, 

MAE1NE AND STATIONABI, 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS 
Mining Maohinery of Every Description, 

Aud all other claBBeB of wort generally done at ftrat- 
olaes establishments, manufactured by us at the lowest 
prices, and of the best quality. 

»y Particular attention paid to Jobbing Work and 
Bepairs. 

N B —Sole Agents for sale of HUNTOON'S CELE- 
BRATED PATENT GOVERNOR. 

I8v20-3m 90DDABD S 00. 



FiriiTOM 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., > 

■ufurAOTuiiBfis or 
\T IS A. M E IV CS I 3V IE »» , 
Quartz, Flour and Saw MU1»» 

1. res' Improved Steam Pamp t Hrodl«*« Im- 
proved Crunher, Mining Pnmpi, 
Amaleamalor», and all kinds 
of Machinery. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How* 
street, San Francisco. 3-Q7 



THE BISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Wonts. 



INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 1863. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000. 



LOCATION OP WORKS: 
Corner of Beale and Howard Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Floor 
Mill Machinery. Steam Boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stationary) , Marine Engines (High and Low Pres- 
sure) . All kinds of light and heavy Castings at lowest 
prices. Cams and Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 

Directors t 

Joseph Moore, 0. J. Brenham, 0. E. MoLmns, 

Wm. Norris, Wm. H. Taylor, Lloyd Tevis, 

James D. Walker. 

WM. H. TAYLOR President 

JOSEPH MOORE . . Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS R. MEAD Secretary 

24vl7-ny 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 
ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

MAOTrACTOREKS Of 

5=1 riSA-M E1VGIIVEB, BOILERS, 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER AND SEDIMENT 
COLLECTOR 

Dunbar's Patent Self- Adjusting- Steam Piston 

PACKING, for now and old Cylinders. 

And all hinds of Mining BEuohlnery. 

Front street, between ST and O streets, 

Sacbamento Pitt. 

PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Established for the Manulacture c£ 

RABLROAD AND OTHER GHON 

— AND — 

Every Variety of ^Halting-, 

Embracing ALL SIZES ■ f 

st.-iimboat Shaft", Oranb.s, Pin ton and Cnn> 

aectlne Bods, Car and Locoiuotlve Axles 

and Frames 

— ALSO — 

HAMMER E O IK-OIV 

Of every description and size. 

93- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILI* 
COMPANY, P. O. box 2032, Sao Francisco, Oal., will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

x&- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 



Miners 7 Foundry and Machine Works, 

CO-OPERATIVE, 

First Street, bet. Howard and FolBom, SanFkano*»oo 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds. 



HYDEAULIC CHIEF. 



FISHER'S 

KNUCKLE 

JOINT 

AND 

NOZZLE 



Cheapest and Best 

Hydraulic Machine 

in use. 




MACHINES 

Manufactured 

TO 0KDEE, 

to throw from 

One 

to an 

eight-inch 

8TREA M. 



The only reliable party In the Hydraulic business who protects bis patrons. 
9v23-tf Address F. H. FISHER, Nevada, Oal. 



HYDRAULIC MINERS, TAKE NOTICE- 1 hereby caution Miners and Manufacturers against making, buy- 
ing, selling or using a Hydraulic Machine or Joint known as the Little Giant, manufactured and sold by R. R. & 
J Craig and Richard Hoskin, as the samo is an infringement upon the invention of the machine known as FISH- 
ER'S HYDRAULIC CHIEF, secured by Letters Patent, No. 110,222, dated Dec. 20, 1870. All parties participating 
in such infringements will be rigorously prosecuted. Nevada, Jan. 13th. F. H. FISHER. 



THE LIGHTNING MILL. 



THE 

LIGHTNING MILL 

For Pulverizing Quartz, 

" Charleston Rock," and all Native Phosphates, 
Flint, Feldspar, Iron Ore, Manganese, Antimony, 
Carbon, Corundum, Old Crucibles, Barytes, Brim- 
stone, Slate, Soapstono, Graphite, Glass, Marble, 
Plaster, Anthracite and Bituminous CoalB, etc. 



WM, STEWART'S 

Patent Bone Mills and 
Crushers. 

For Grinding Bones, Rock, Quartz, and all hard 
substances; alao, Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Coffee, 
Spices, eta. 

WALKER BROS-?&RCO., Twenty-third and Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Sole Manufacturers of Stewart's 
Celebrated Patent Bone Mills and Crushers, A. W. Straub & Co.'s Patent Revolution French Burr Mill and A. 
Duval's Patent Centrifugal Pumps. 




MINING 



CAM ERON'S 



STEAM PUMPS 



DAVID STODDART, 



114 Beale Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 




JOHN WRIGHT, 

Manufacturer of all Kinds of MINERS' and RAILROAD PICKS, 



(ALL ADZE-EYES) OF SUPERIOR QUALITY. 
13 a d 15 Fremont Street, at Nelson & Doble's, 



■ San Francisco. 



Sole Agent for Washoe Tool Nll'g Co.'s Goods west of Rocky Mountains. 



1 Round Eye surface, 4 lbs $U 

2 ■• " i% lbs 14 

3 "5 lbs 15 

4 '• " 594 lbs 18 

5 " "6 lbs 20 

6 " " 6J3 lbs 22 

1 "7 lbs 24 

8 Flat Eye surface, 4 lbs 18 

9 " " iii lbs 18 

" " 5 lbs •. 18 

5«lbs 20 

6 lbs 22 

6J* lbs 24 

7 lbs 24 

354 lbs 16 

4 lbs 16 



11 

12 " 

13 " 

14 

15 Drifting 

16 



No. 17 Drifting 4>4 lbs $17 

No.18 " 6 lbs 17 

No.19 " 654 lbs 20 

No.20 " 6 lbs 24 

No. 21 Poll 4 lbs 20 

No.22 " 4!4lbs 20 

No.23 " 5 lbs 20 

No.24 " 6!4 lbs 22 

No.25 " 6 lbs 24 

No.26 " 654 lbs 30 

No.27 " 7 lbs 30 

No.28 Coal 2 lbs ...U 

No. 29 " 2J41bs 14 

No. 30 ■' 3 lbs 16 

No.31 " 3>41bs 16 



Washoe Mattocks rmd other Washoe goods cheap. Also, Pick Eyes ready for the steel, for 
Blacksmiths, which will be sold cheap. Prices from $12 to $16. 14v26-2am3m 



CAUFORNiA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

So. 1S5 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

all KE»iPB of Br ass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Meta 
Hastings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds. Spikes, Sheathing 
Kails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steamboat BclUand 
Qfiiigsof superiortone. All kindsof Cocks and Valves, Hy 
drnul'c Pipes and Noszles,and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
fci.nis of all ■jizes and oatlems. furnished with dispatch. 
55- FT.TOEP MODERATE. ^* 
'. !!. ""F.KP. V. KIN^WELL. 



C. "W". BEOTJLTHROP & CO., 
I>i?au.grlit s me n. 

Plans, Specifications, and Estimates for 
Machinery of all Kinds. 

We also design machines to meet particular demands 
and secure and assign the patents mi the game. 

Nu. 237 First street, S*n Francisco. apl9-3m 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA FOUNDK/Y, 

129 and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard, 
San Francisco. 

M6HT AND HEATTOA8TIN68, 

of every description, manufactured. 24vI6yr 



THEODORE KALLENBERG, 
MACHINIST, 

and Maker of Models for Inventors. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all hinds of 

Small Gears Cut. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and In tlit 

best manner. No. 32 Fremont street, S. F. 19v23-3in 



GEO. W. PBESCOTT. 



O. W. SOHEEDEL. W. B. ECHABT 



PRESC0TT, SCHEIDELL & CO., 
MARYSVILLE FOUNDRY. 

Cor»er of B and Fourth streets, Marysville, Cal. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

steam: kiv o t tn kh, 

STATIONARY AND PORTABLE 

SAW AND GRIST MILLS, 

Hydraulic Machinery, 

Quartz Crushing and Amalgamating 

Machinery 

Of every description, constantly on hand. 



Plans and estimates furnished upon application. 
Repairs upon all kinds of Machinery promptly made, 
>nd at moderate charges. 

Having unrivalled facilities, we are prepared to make 
to order, at short notice, anything required in our line. 

Specimens of our work may be seen in all the mining 
regions on this coast. 



A. H AN KE'S 
IROJV FOUNDRY, 

CO tNER MATN AND HARRISON STREETS, 
Entrance on Main Street San Francisco. 

Every Description of Ornamental "Work, 

Stove and French Range "Work, grate and fender work, 

small machines of all descriptions, house 

work, etc., promptly attended to. 

25v26-3m 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

137 and 139 First street SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEIGER & ROLAND, 

IRON FOUNDERS. 

IRON CASTINGS of all descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepburn Rolling- Pan 
and Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for Burning 
Screenings. 

Notice. — Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior Shoes and Dies. 20v26.3m 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY. 




The inventor having perfected and tested the durability 
and capacity of these Batteries to his entire satisfaction, is 
now ready to manufacture and guarantee them. Parties 
in want of a Battery cannot find their equal in regard to 
PRICE, WEIGHT, CAPACITY, POWER TO RUN THEM. 

State and County Rights for Sale by 

G. D. CROCKER, 

17v26-tf 315 California street, San Francisco. 



Friel's Patent Paragon VaporStove. 

PATENT GRANTED. 
The Great Labor Saver of the Household- 

Economy, Convenience and Safety Combined. 

just think of it— 

No Wood, no Coal, no Coal 
Gas, no Stove Pipe, no 
Chimney, no Smoke, no 
ABhes, no Dirt, no Wood 
Boxes, no Coal Scuttles, 
no Kindling Wood, but a 
Friction Match, and the 
Fire in Pull Blast in 

Half a Minute! 
OVEN HOT IN TWO 
MINUTES. 
Steak broiled in seven 
minutest Baked Beans in 
thirty minutes I The fire 
extinguished in a moment 
And the house unheated ! 
It has no rival in all 
kinds of Cooking and Flat 
Iron Heating, and com- 
bines Economy, Conven- 
ience, Neatness, Safety 
and Durability! The La- 
dies welcome it; a little 
Child can operate it, and 
A.11 Recommend It. 
Prices from $5 to $25, according to size. Manufac- 
t ured and sold by WM. FRIEL, 

69 and 71 Fourth street, San Francisco. 
N. B.— Agents wanted in every town in the State. On 
payment of $5, one Stove will be sent as sample. 
22v25-2amly 




The "Most Complete Invention for Opening: 
Cans ever Invented. 

No family that uses canned Fruits, Vegetables, Sar- 
dines or Oysters, should be without one of these con- 
venient household tools. No ReBtaurant, Hotel or 
Oyster Saloon can afford to do withont one. It will 
cut any shaped hole, from a triangle to a, perfect circle. 
One sample sent postage free for 75 cents. 

WTESTER & CO., 

17 New Montgomery st. (under Grand Hotel) , S. F. 



BUY BARBER'S BIT BRACK. 



-*• 



July 12, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



31 



Metallurgy and Ores, improved 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO.. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ADVANCES HADE 

•■ avll kinds of Ores, and partlcalar all«ntloB 

PAID TO 

OOMSIONMENTS OF OUOM. 

MMn 



m. W. rTKOSO. W. L. .THONG. 

C. W. 8TRONC A OO., 

Mfliilliii-tjifiil Workl, 
Mo. 10 Bterexuon BtrMt, near Pint, 9am FBAMOiaoo 

We purchae* Ores, Bullion, etc. Ores worked r aod 
Teats made with care. Also, Aaaays of Gold, Silver, 
(topper, Lead, Tin and other Metals. -'Jvjjif 



LEOPOLD KUH, 

(Formerly o( the D. 8. Branch Mint, 8. F.) 

Aj*Htlj'er anil IMetu.llurjjie&} 

CHEMIST, 

No. 011 Commercial Street, 

(Opposite the U . 8. Branch Mint 

Ham Fbancisco, Cal. 7v2X-8m 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

lafPORTEBS OF AND DEALERS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 
612 and 614 Washington street, SAN FRANCISCO 

We would call the special attention of ABsayers 
Chemists, Mining Companies, Milling Companies 
VroapcctorB, etc., to our large and well adapted stock o 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

— AJID — 

Chemical Apparatus, 

Having been engaged In fur/Dishing these supplies sines 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast. 

t7~ Our Gold and Silver Tables, showing the value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and val- 
uable tables for computation of assays in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 

7v25-tf JOHN TAYLOR & 00. 



Important to Miners and Mill Men. 

SilTer-Plated Copper Amalgamating Plates, 
for Saving Gold. 

I Of all sizes and in any quantity, furnished to 
order. Full instructions sent for operating. 
Particular attention given to plating goods for 

Builders, Plumbers, etc. Hotel and Restaurant 

work replated. 

San Fbancisco Gold and Silver Plating Workb, 

66fl Mission street, San Francisco. 
2v25-3m E. Gh DENNISTON, Proprietor. 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

I heie Maclilnea Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be spared 
to have them constructed in the most perfect manner 
and of the great number now in operation, not one has 
ever required rapairs. The constant and increasing de- 
mand for them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam directly 
into the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as deBired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows. 

The pun being filled, the motion of the muller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 
the apperturo and between the grinding surfaces. — 
Thence it is thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. 
The curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
passes down, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it is constantly passing a regular flow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and into the quicksilver, until the ore is 
reduced to an impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated. 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles axe rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Hill-men axe invited to examine these pans and setlers 
(or themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San Francisc* 



Nevada Metallurgical Works. 

RIOTTE & LUCKHARDT, 

Consulting: Mining Engineers and Metal- 
lurgists, No. 21 First St., S. F. 



.V.»u.h furnished for the most suitable Process for Ores. 
Assaying In nil tin Branches. 

Analysis of Ores, Minerals, Waters and all other sub- 
stances. 

ej*" Special attention paid to the mining and metal- 
lurgy of Quicksilver. 26vll-Gm 




STEAM ENGINE REGULATOR. 

OVER 400 HAVE BEEN PUT IN USE. 

RECOMMENDATION. 



JOSHUA IIE.NDY, ESQ.. San Kuan Cisco: 

Dear Sir: We, tha uDdeislgiied, take pleuara in |dvlnf 

von the fulluwiiiK ti'-tiiii-uial as to the nierila uf tin- lL-ndy 
Governor, which wc urdered Tom you about. f"ur timiithn 
at;o. Though more than pleased with i's workings at first, 
we deferred writing until wo had tv.stvd it thoroughly. 

Our cngfno is l'-USH (carrvlngTO fl>s. of steam,, driving 16 
■tunnt, 725 !*>*. '.-oil, ] Wheeler Pan, 1 Knox Pan, B Bends 
('.oicntra'ors. Tho diau'iruVd Governor wan the common 
"Arm ami Ball Governor j" it giving but poor Nttittfactioii. 
we decided t-> try the "HEKD*," anil are pleased to report 
n Its favor for the fallowing roamna: 

1st. It Mavkr i'» I-'okl. Previous to attaching your Gov- 
ernor wo wew burning 3k cords of wood per 34 hours. Wo 
now Donetuna ion _"_. cords doing tho -aim- work. 

2d. FOB Saci tv. The " trip" anvod us from un expensive 
smash up but a few day* a«o, during the temporary ab- 
*oncc of our emrineor. The Governor bolt run off the Pul- 
leys. Your little automatic trip worked like a charm, and 
but one or two revolution* was tho result, and no damage. 
Hud wc been usii'w any other Governor, the probability Is 
that we would not have had a who Ic cam in the mill, 

ad. It is a Peiifkct Governor. Wc can turn off the 
Whoclor Pan and hum: up ono-thlrd of our stamp, without 
any perceptible change in speed. 

4th. Tiik Adjustment for regulating the speed without 
increasing or reducing the size of our Governor pulley, is 
admirable, and as easily managed as setting a clock. 

5th. It is Bimplk and not liable to get out of order, or 
n muring more than ordinary care. 

Yours respectfully, 

JAS. H. CROSSMAN, Supt. 
GEO. II. BARNEY, Chief Eng'r. 

REFERENCES: 
Rhode Island Mill, Crown Point M. Co., Gold Hill, Nev. 
Eureka M. Co., Overman M. Co., Virginia City, Nev. 
Gump Floyd M. Co,, Utah 8. M. Co., Utah. 
Falk & Miner, Eureka ; J. M. Brown, Hollister; Gazos 

Mill, Pescadero, Cal. 
Also, Bancroft & Co.; Yolo Mills; The Union, Golden 

Gate, iEtna and Fulton Iron Works, of this city. 

All Governors Tested, the Number Revo- 
lutions Marked on the Cross-Head, and 
Warranted Perfectly Reliable. 

JOSHUA HENDY, 

No. 32 Fremont Street SAN FRANCISCO. 

PATENT ORE AMALGAMATORS AND CONCENTRATORS, 

Circular Saw Mills. Steam Engine Governors. 

Send for Descriptive Circular. feb22-lam-tf 



San Francisco Boiler Works, 

123 and 125 Beale Street SAN FRAN CISCO 

F*. I. CURRY, 

(Late Foreman of the Vulcan Iron Works,) Proprietor. 




High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 
SSnitAJL, BOHLiEIt. 

SHEET IRON WORK of every description done 
at the Shortest Notice. 

All kinds of JOBBING and REPAIRING promptly 
attended to. 17v25-3m 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

I i O X L E 1* M A K K 11 « 

AND GKNKUAL MACHINISTS, 

Howard st., between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco . 



Coleman's Patent Sulphuret Saving Machine. 




1873 



ILLUSTRATED IN MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS MAY 13, 
^end for Circulars Containing* Description. 

Address C O. COLEMAN, 

Nos. 18 and 20 Fremont street, San Francisco.; cars ol F. A. HUNTINGTON. 
24v26-eow4t 



PLATINUM 



"Vessels, Apparatus, Sheet, Wire, Etc., Etc. 

For all Laboratory and Manufacturing Purposes 
H. M RAYNOR, 
25 Bond street, New York, 
'■■tisiunin Scrap and Ore purchased. ! 



Richardson & Co., Copper Ore Wharves. 

SWANSEA. 
Richabdson & Co. have been for thirty years established 
in Swansea as Agents for the preparation Sampling, Assay- 
ing, and sale of Copper, Silver, Gold, Lead, Zino, and all 
other Ores and Metals, for which they have extensive Ware- 
houses and Wharves undercover, 1,000 feet of Quay Front- 
age within the Floating Dock, and the most complete Ma- 
chinery and Appliances. They are also pi epareu to make 
advances against Ores in anticipation of realization, and to 
guarantee ull payments when required. 26v26 ly 



NICKEL PLATING. 

The San Francisco Nickel Plating" Company 
Are prepared to plato articles of all descriptions, of any 
metal. Cutlery, Liquor Flasks, PistolB, Guns,Swords,Bri- 
dle Bitts, Pole Crabs.Hub Bands, Dash Rails, and all arti- 
cles of household hardware plated at short notice, and 
warranted. Nickel Plate never tarnishes or corrodes, 
always retaining its polish until the article is worn out. 
Office at the KIMBALL MANUFACTORY WORKS, Cor. 
Fourth and Bryant StreetB. 12v26-3m 



SCREW BOLT WORIiS, 

PHELPS BROTHERS, Proprietors 

MANTJFACTUBEBS OF ALL KINDS OF 

Machine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, and Ship or 
Band Bolts. 

13, 16 and 17 Drumm Street, San Francisco. 4v241y 



Jos. Thobnhtli,, 
1612 Mason Street, near Green. 



C. W. White. 
47 Olay Street. 



JOS. THORNHIXL, 
Bricklayer mul Contractor 

Particular attention paid to all kinds of FIRE WORK 

such a3 BOILERS, FURNACES, OVENS 

GRATES RANGES, etc. 



HHKET IRON PIPE. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET IRON AND A8PHALTUM 
PIPE, of any size and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the least amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Car Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Cars . These small wheels are made 
of the best Car Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can bo 
flttedup with the improved axle and box — introduced by 
this company, and guaranteed to outlast any other 
wheels made in this State. 

1kJ~ All kinds of Machinery made and repaired. 

24v22-3m JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS. 




&, H. BAJRTXETT, 



Manufacturers of Files of every Description, 

Nob. 33, 41 and 43 Richmond street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

MILL SAW FILES A SPECIALTY. 
18v25-ly 



Petbchasebs please say advertised in Scientific Press. 



BURLEIGH 
ROCK DRILLS 

—AND— 

Air Compressors. 



The Burleigh Rock Drills, which have stood the test 
of five years' constant use at the Hoosac Tunnel, and 
which are now in use in neurly every State in the Union, 
as well &6 in Europe and South America, are unenualed 
in efficiency and economy by any other Drilling Ma- 
chine. They are of various sizes, and equally well 
adapted to Tunneling, Shafting, Open Cut or Quarry- 
ing, and will drill six to ten inches per minute in gran- 
ite. They are driven by steam above ground. The Bur- 
leigh Air Compressor is the best engine yet devised for 
furnishing the "air motor" for the many purposes to 
which it is now being used. 

They are to be used on the St. Gothard Tunnel, Swit- 
zerland; Tunnel 13 miles long. We refer to the follow- 
ing gentlemen and works : 

Gen. Newton, U. S. A Hell Gate Tunnel, L. I. 

Mess. Shanley Hoosac Tunnel, Mass. 

J. Dutton Steele Nesquenoning Tunnel, Pa. 

Sidney Dillon Fourth Avenue Work, N. Y. 

Col. Roebling East River Bridge Company, N. Y. 

For further information, etc., adlrees 

L. C. PARKE, 

VIRGINIA CITY, NEVADA. 
Agent fob the Pacific Coast. fl5 



NELSON <fc DOBLE, 



AGP.VT8 FOB 



Thomas Firth & Sons' Cast Steel. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Sleds***, Eliinimvrs, Stone 

Cotters', Blacksmith*' 

and Biorae-Shoei-s* 

Tools. 



Britton, Holbrcok & Co., Importers of 

Stoves and Metals. Tinners' Gooda, Tnols aud Machines; 
111 and 11 California St., 17 and 19 IVavis St., San Fran*- 
cisco, and 178 J St., Sacramento. mr.-ly 



32 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 12, 1873. 



Meetings and Elections. 

AtmuHN Gold M-neng Co.— July 2d. Directors: Geo. 
W Beaver (President,) J. R- Nickerson, Peter Sauter, 
Jas. Bee, L. M. Foulke, R. Wegener, (Sec'y,) John 
Hanson, (Supt.) 

Pioneebs Election.— The annual election of the So 
ciety of California Pioneers came off on the 7th inst. 
Less than 300 votes were cast, resulting in the election 
of the entire regular ticket, as follows: President, Jas. 
Lick- Vice -Presidents— David J. Staples, Peter Dean, 
John H. Jewett, Benj. P. Kooser, J. Ross Browne; Sec- 
retary, Louis R. Lull; Treasurer, Howard Havens; Mar- 
shall, William Hnefner ; Directors — Thomas Nelson, 
Emil B. Buffande an. Willi am 0. Randolph, C.A.C. Duis- 
iuberg, Jacob Deeth, James Neal, Arch. Wasou, Henry 
H. Ellis, Washington Bartleit. 

Newark M.Oo, July 8.— Trustees; S. Heydenfeldt. 
Jesse Wall, F. W. Clute, A. P. Minear and J. N. Vunont; 
C W. Watson, Superintendent, and D. T. Bagley, Secre- 

tt BANK of California.— At the monthly meeting of 
the Directors of the Bank of California, held on the 
8th inst., W. 0. Ralston was elected President, in place 
of D. O. Mills, resigned, and Thomas Brown, Cashier. 
Mr Mills retains his seat as a member of the Board of 
Directors. The newly-elected officers are to assume 
their duties on the 15th inst. The usual monthly divi- 
dend of one per cent.— 550,000— was declared, payable 
on the 15th. . 

The Dividend of the Crown Point mine, this month, 
is $4 per share, amountng to $i00,000; last month It 
was $10 per share, or $1,000,000. 

Rook Island M. Co., July 9.— Trustees: A. K. P. Har-. 
mon, W. B. Thornburgh, Joseph Clark, J. E. de la 
Montague and John Skae. 

Ex Dorado Soma Cons. M. Co., July 9.— Trustees: 
A H Rutherford, J. A. Pritchard, A. J. Bryant, Henry 
Epstein, Edward Vollner, Henry Mayers and A. Gold- 
smith. Since March, 1873, the mine has produced 
bullion valued at §212,000. , 

Produce Exchange.— President, Horace JDavis; Vice 
President, E. G. Mathews: Treasurer, E. Ransoiu. 
Directors: D. Ballard, P. A. Campbell, T. H. Hammer, 
Adam Booth, Wilford Page and H. C. Somers. 

New Incorporations. 

The following named company has filed its certificate 
of incorporation in the Secretary of State's office, 
Sacramento. 

The Auburn, El Dorado and Forest Hill Turnpike 
Road Company, July 7. Object, the construction and 
maintenance of a toll road from Auburn Station, 
Placer County, to Engles toll road. Capital stock, $20,- 
000. Trustees— Louis Bulens, Q. D. Pratt, Robert Les- 
lie, Michael Hohman, B. R Wells, Sec'y. 

Honor to the Veterans. — Honor also to the invont- 
ors whose genius has emancipated the race of woaaen 
from the drudgery of the needle. Honor above all to 
a firm -which, like the Wilson Sewing Machine 
Company, distributes its machines broadcast through- 
out the land, at prices that even the poor and humble 
can afford to pay. Salesroom, at 337 Kearny St., San 
Francisco, and in all other cities on the Pacific coast. 
The company ■want agents in country towns. * 

In Town.— L. P. McCarty, Esq., corresponding agent 
of the Mining and Soientifio Press, and Dewey & Co.'s 
general traveling agent, paid us a visit on Friday last. 
This gentleman's reputation as a canvasser is first- 
class. We have never met with any one who under- 
stood the business better, and never expect to. — Cala- 
veras Citizen, San Andreas. 

Subscribers, Examine Tour Accounts 
Oil the printed label pasted upon your paper or its wrap-- 
por. If you are not credited, after paying your subscription, 
write to us at once. If you hold ;i receipt, ar.d the agent 
fails to report your payment or the full term oi your pay- 
ment, it i?i important for us to Know it without delay. The 
following abbreviations are used on some of our labels: 
Jny jy Apr ap Jul jl Oct oc 1873 TA 

Feb fb May my Aug au Nov nv J8U 74 

Mar mr Jan jn Sep ap Dec dc 1875 75 

Other figures denote the day of the month paid to. 

Subscribers will also oblige by notifying us of any mis- 
take*, discrepancies and irregularities of agents or mailing 
clerks. 

THE DAILY MINING- PRESS. 

This four-paged sheet is issued IMMEDIATELY after 
hi session of the San Francisco Stock and Exchange 
Boards. It contains full LIST OF SALES made at the 
same. Also, a list of all ASSESSMENTS advertised in 
San Francisco up to the date of issue— giving the amount 
date, delinquent, name of Secretary, and location of office; 
MEETINGS; DIVIDENDS, etc. Latest by TELEGRAPH 
and by MAIL from the mines. ORIGINAL CORRES- 
PONDENCE from Virginia City and other prominent 
mining districts appear daily or weekly. MINING NEWS 
SUMMARY specialty collated. TABLES and STATIS- 
TICS prepared carefully for convenience and quick refer, 
ence. Prices of Government, City, and other BONDS and 
STOCKS, GOLD, LEGAL TENDERS, etc., quoted up to 
within one hour of issue. Sample copies free. TAKE IT 
ON TRIAL. Subscription, 25 cents per week, by earner 
By mail, $8 per annum. Address MINING and SCIEN- 
TIFIC PRESS Office, San Francisco. 

Free Samples. 

Wo shall from time to time send samples free of this pa- 
per to parties whom we believe would be profited by sub- 
scribing. We only ask that uch persons give it a fair con- 
sideration. 

THE NEW TJ. S. MINING LAWS. 

The new Laws of 1872, governing the location and 
purchase of Placer and Quartz MineB and Agricultural 
Lands in Mining Districts of the U.S., printed in cir- 
cular sheet, for sale at this office. Single copies, 25 cts 
Usual discount to the trade. 



THE NEW COAX- LAND LAW AND REGU- 
LATIONS THEREUNDER. 

A pamphlet under the above heading, containing the full 
tex.1 of the "Coal Land Bill," published and for sale at 
this office. Price 10 cts, 

TryDr. Evory's Diamond Catarrh. Remedy. 
Only 50 Cents. 

Says John to Nance, you look so bright. 
Your eyes they sparkle, like a star. 

Ohl yes, says Nance, Dr. Evory's remedy 
HaB cured that horrid, bad catarrh. 

Out t the Foq at Last. — Dr. Evory has discovered 
the only sure cure for Catarrh and Colds. One bottle 
gives immediate relief, and a few bottles effect a cure. 
All we ask is a trial. If your druggist don't have it, 
send to Dr. A. F. Evory & Co., 9 Post street, S. F. It 
only coBta 50 cts. 14v2C-3m 



No Llfe Insurance Company has a better record or more 
permanently popular reputation than tho Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. J. B. Roberta, 315 Calif ornia 
Street, San Francisco, is general agent for this Coast, 
Send to him for circulars and iniormation of this reliable, 
first-class company, 



Continental Lifb Insdkanck Co., No. 302 
Montgomery street, corner of Pine. 



ASBESTOS ROOFING. 
Over 15,000,000 Square Feet in Use. 

THE ASBESTOS ROOFING IS A SUBSTANTIAL AND RELIABLE MATERIAL, 
Which can be Safely Used in Place of Tin, Slate, etc., 

ON STEEP OE FLAT KOOFS, IN ALL CLIMATES. 

It can lt»e Cheaply Transported and Easily Applied. 
THE PACIFIC COAST TRADE SUPPLIED BY 

PERINE & EDWARDS, 

No. 638 Market Street, San Francisco, Oal. 
2v6bp4te 



GIANT POWDER. 

Patented May 26, 1S68. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIANT POWDEK, NO. 1, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GIANT POWDER, IVO- 2 9 

For medium and Beamy Root, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and Gravel Bank Blasting, "Wood, etc. 
Its EXCLUSIVE use eaves from 30 to 60 per cent, in expenses, "besides doing the work in half the time 
required for black powder. 

B3" The only BlaBting Powder used in Europe and the EaBtern States. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 

20v22-3ml6p General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



To Capitalists and Hydraulic Miners. 
PATENT SELF-CLEANING SLUICE 



This new and useful invention is designed to collect 
all the gold as fast as it is Bet free from the dissolving 
earth, and conduct it into a receptacle of mercury or 
safety pocket, under lock and key, from whence it may 
be removed in a few moments, without either checking 
the flow of water or interfering in the least with the 
washing. 

The invention, if properly placed in our rivers, will 
also collect the gold which is yearly traveling down 
their channels, thus affording an annual income with a 
trifling expense for attending. 

For further particulars address 

DR. J. B. BEERS, 

2v27tf 230 Kearny street, San Francisco. 




The object of this school is to impart a thorough edu- 
cation in business affairs. It is open to persons of both 
sexes and of all ages. There is an English Department 
for those not sufficiently advanced for the Business 
Course. Sessions continue day and evening throughout 
the year. Students can enter at anytime. All wishing 
to be successful should secure a practical education at 
this College. Send for " Heald's College Journal," and 
learn full particulars. Sent free to all by addressing 
E. P. HEALD, Pres. Business College, San Francisco 
Oal. 2v27-ly 



Anglo-Californian Bank. 

LIMITED. 

Successors to J. Seligrman & Co. 

London Office No. 3 Angel Court. 

San Francisco Office No. 412 California street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000, 

Subscribed, $3,000,000. Paid in, $1,600,000. 
Remainder subject to call. 

Directors to London— Hon. Hugh MeCnlloch, Reuben 
D. Sassoon, "William V. Schofield, Isaac Seliginan, Julius 
Ling ton. 

Managers: 

B. G. SNJGATH, I6NATZ STEINHART, 

San Francisco. 

The Bank is now prepared to open accounts, receive de- 

EOHits, make collections, buy and sell Exchange, and issue 
e Iters of Credit available throughout the world, and to 
loan money on proper securities. 2v27-eowbp 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

532 California street, corner of "Webb. 



For the half year ending with the 30th of June, 1873, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of nine and 
six-tenths (9 6-10) per cent, per annum on Term depos- 
its, and eight (8) per cent, per annum on Ordinary 
deposits, free of Federal tax, payable on and after July 
14th, 1873. By order. 

LOVELL WHITE Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAVINGS AND - LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 619 Olay Street . San Francisco, 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held this day, 
a dividend waB declared for the six months ending June 
30, 1873, of nine and six-tenths (9 6-10) per cent, per 
aunum on all deposits, free of Federal Tux, and payable 
on and after the 15th inst. 

B n CYETJS W. CAMANY, Cashier. 
San Francisco, July 8, 1873. jyl'2-2t 



Ashcroft's Patent Steam 
Gauges, 

(Original — with Bourdon Spring). 



Steam Gauges, 
Vacuum Gauges, 
Registering Gauges, 
Test Gauges. 



Low jWater Alarms, Gaug« Cocks, Glass 
Water G-aug-es, Cylinder Cups, Self-Oilers, 
Boiler Felting-, Seidell's, Tuck's, Hemp and 
Soapstone Packing-. Stocks, Taps and Dies, 
Twist Drills, Drill, Lathe and Planer Chucks, 
Emery Wheels, Etc. 

Every description of Engineers' and Ma- 
chinists' supplies, for sale by 

TBEADWELL & CO., San Francisco. 

2v2Gtf 




Second-Hand Engines and Boilers 

For Sale by McAFHE, SPIERS & 00., 
Boiler Makers, etc, 309 to 315 Howard St. 

15-Hobse Poweb Portable Threshing Engine — 
Nearly new made by Wood & Mann. Cylinder 9 inches 
diameter, 12-inch stroke. Boiler large and well 
proportioned, has all the mountings, is mounted on 
wheels, in first-rate condition, and will be sold cheap. 
This is the very thing for opening a new or working a 
small mine. Price, $1,350. 

30-Horse Poweb Locomotive ob Fire Box Boiler — 
made of the best C. H. No. 1 American iron, 5-16 inch 
thick. Furnace ± feet long, shell 42 inches diameter, 
contains 46 tubes bxl & inches, with grate bars, breech- 
ing and smoke stack, all in good condition. Price, $750. 

Three 35-Horse Power Hollers, each 50 inches di- 
ameter, 16 feet long, containing 42 tubes %% inches 
diameter. These boilers have been entirely rebuilt, and 
are in thoroughly good condition. Will be sold to- 
gether, or separately, at a low price. 

15-Hobse Power Boileb — 32 inches diameter, 12 feet 
long, containing 32 tubes 2H inches diameter, with 
steam drum, furnace front, grates and all fittings. 
Price, $300. 

Build all kinds of Boilers, "Water Pipe, Pump Column, 
Bucket?, Tanks, etc. jy!2-lm 



The New Wilson 

SEWING MACHINE 

Has pointB of superiority over 
all others. A reliable warran- 
ty is given with each machine 
for 

EIVE YEARS. 

It is unequaled for light and 

heavy work. Examine and 

compare it with lhe highest 

priced machine in the market. 

G. A. NORTON, Gen. Ag't 
for the Pacific Coast. 

337 Kearny St., S. F. 
12v27eow-bp-ly 




PKSCE, $50. 



MAGAZINES. 

Harper's 

Atlantio 

Godey ... 

New York Ledger.. . 

Blackwood 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 

Peterson s 

Arthur 

Lady a Friend 

Harper's Weekly... 
Chimney Corner..,. 

Literary Album 

London Society 

All the Year Round 
London 111. News. 



3 00 

5 00 

6 00 
IS 00 



W. E. L00MIS; 
News Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 

S, E. corner of Sansome and 

Washington streets, 

SUPPLIES ALL 

Eastern Periodicals, 

by. the 
Tear, Month, or Number, 



W. T. GARRATT & CO. 

C I T "X" 

Brass and Bell Founder, 

Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Brass, Zinc and Anti-Friction or Babbet Meta 

CASTINGS, 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

TiVERN AND AND BELLS, OOXOS, 

FIBE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS. 

Steam, Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Cocke, 
and ValveB of all descriptions, made and repaired. 
Hose and all other Joints, Spelter, Solder and Cop- 
per Rivets, etc. Gauge Cocks , Cylinder Cocks, Oil 
Globes, Steam Whistles. HYDRAULIC PIPES AND 
NOZZLES for mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fur- 
nishod with Fittings, etc. Coupling Joints of all sizes. 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Work. Manufac- 
turer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 

US-Highest Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, COP- 
PER and BRASS. C-tf 

W. T. GARRATT, JAMES HTLLMAN, W. T. LITTLE. 



N. W. SPATJLDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 

Nos. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market. 











MANUFAOTUBEB OF 

Patent Tooth Cirwlar Saws. 

They have proved to be the most du able and economi- 
cal Saws in the Woiid. 

Each Saw is Warranted in every respect, 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT KOTICJS 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



For the very Best Photographs go to BRAD 
LEY & RULOFSON'S GALLERY, with an " Elevator,' 
429 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 26v4--eowhp3m 1 rates, 



HALLIDIE'S 

Patent Endless Wire Eopeway. 

Covered by Numerous U. S. Patents. 

IMPORTANT TO 

Mining Companies, Civil Engineers, Con- 
tractors, Etc. 

The system of transporting material, such as Ores, 
from the mine to the mill, Earths for embankments, 
Rock from quarries, etc., by means of steel wire rope, 
has been well tested and found more economical, 
advantageous and reliable than any other method 
of transportation ; and to the annexed certificates in con- 
nection therewith I beg to call the attention of those in- 
terested: 

Eureka, Nevada, July 10, 1872. 

T. M. Martin My doar sir: On your leaving for San 
Francisco, it gives me great pleasure to hand you my 
written acceptance of the HALLIDIE TRAMWAY put 
up by you upon our mine in Freiburg, 

It is a perfect success, discharging ten tons of ore per 
hour with two men's labor. It is perfectly simple in 
construction, and, as far as I can jndge.there is nothing 
about it to ever get out of order— nothing to wear out. 
While ours requires but about two thousand five hun- 
dred feet of wire rope, I can see no reason why the line 
could not bo extended almost indefinitely with equally 
happy results. Again, the carrying capacity might be 
doubled or quadrupled if desired. After several weeks 
trial upon our mine, the unanimous verdict of all who 
have seen it is a complete, unquestioned success. If 
this can be of any service to you, use it in any way you 
think proper. Very respectfully, C. C. GOODWEN. 
Emma Hull Consolidated Mining Co., ) 
Little Cottonwood, Utah, > 
Superintendent's Office, Sept. 28, 1872. ) 

T. M. Martin, E^Q.,— sir: The Ropeway constructed by 
you (HALLIDIES PATENT) for the Emma Hill Consoli- 
dated Mining Company, lias been built in a most substantial 
and workmanlike manner, and is at this time in splendid 
working condition. I most cheerf ulljr accept the work tor 
the Company, and recommend it to others wishing a sure 
and speedy transit tor ores over places impracticable for 



W. UOLBA.TH, Superintendent. 

"The Vallejo works smoothly with the elevated wire 
tramway, which carries its load of ore as inietly and easily 
as if there was no winter or Bnow in the world- 

*• Whatever the objections to wire tramways may be on 
account of their cose, I have Keen nothing yet that even 
approaches them in the facilities they afford for moving 
ore at all seasons of the year."— Correspondent Utah Min- 
ing Journal, Alia, Jan. 8, 1873. 

Tlie "Vallejo Ropeway. 

The Vallejo Tunnel Company's Tramway in Little Cotr- 
tonwood, built on the HALLIDIE PATENTED PLAN, is 
a comlpete success. It is between 2,300 and 2,400 feet in 
length, and is supported by thirteen stations The fall in 
this distance is about 600 feet, and the wire rope, which is 
three-fourths of an inch in diameter, will safely and easily 
deliver one hundred tons in six hours. Tho machinery is 
automatic, loading and unloading the sacks or buckets. 
About one t"U and a half can be sent down at one time. 
The Btations are about two hundred feet upart.and the entire 
apparatus is strong and safe, As the wire rope is elevated 
about forty feet above the surface of the hill, the Tramway 
can be worked nil whiter long, without the slightest trou- 
ble.— Utah Mining J iHirnal, Suit Lake, Sept. 23, 1872. 

Mining Companies and others desiring to negotiate for 
the erection of this system of Ropeway, o:m communicate 
with me personally, or through Postoftice Box 90*. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, Patentee, 
113 and 115 Pine Street, SAN Fbancisco. 
AVJCR.E ItOI*E3 

For hoisting from mines, transmitting power, ship rigging 
etc., of all kinds and sizes, on hand and made to order. 
Wire of all kinds and descriptions, furnished at lowest 



A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 and 115 Pine St. 




An II I a si rated 



BY T>EWEY 4c CO. 

i ■>( Solicitors. 



SAN FKANCISCO, SATUEDAT, JULY 19, 1873. 



VOLUME 3C3CVII. 

Kumber 3. 



Concentrating Ores—The Dtsch Autom- 
atic Jig. 

Id our issae of July 5th we made some re- 
marks on the importance of tho concentration 
of ores, and gavo an illustration of Wren's ore 
concentrator, a newly invented machine for 
accomplishing the object referred to. Wo now 
illustrate the Utsch Automatic Jig, a de- 
vice highly spoken of where it has been used. 
It was fully described in a paper read before 
the American Institute of Mining Engineers at 
Philadelphia, by Henry Engelmaun, E. M., 
and subsequently published in the Engineering 
and Mining Journal, from which source we 
gather the facts concerning it. 

The Utsch jig was invented and first pat in 
operation in Germany, then simultaneously 
patented and introduced in Euglaud and the 
Continental States, in Australia and America. 
It was first adopted in the United States by the 
Matthieasen and Hegeler Zinc Co., at Lasalle, 
111. There it performed the work of sorti ng 
the peouliar ore of that locality into no less 
thanyiue distinct divisions of material, consist- 
ing mainly of: (a) gangue and non-metallic 
waste; (b) grains consisting of gangue, with 
calamine or blende attached, which are crushed 
finer; (c) zinc-blende and calamine for the zinc 
furnaces; (d) grains of zinc ore with particles 
of galena attached, which are crushed finer; 
(e) pure lead ore; working up from 20 tons of 
rich, to 55 tons of poor raw material for 10 
hours work per jig. 

The principle upon which the self- 
regulating discharge of this jig is 
founded, is that of mutually balanced 
columns of minerals of uaiform specific weight 
iu each column, and different specific weights 
in the different columns. Each column dis- 
charges the surplus, whenever an accumulation 
of the material composing it increases its 
height. A column of galena of sp. gr. 7,5 
and 3 inches high, exercises the same pressure 
as a column of blende, sp. gr. 4 and 5.62 
incheB high. They balance each other. The 
height of the water in each partition, and other 
minor conditions, enter into calculation. The 
different minerals being confined to their res- 
pective compartments, by the construction of 
the machine, the discharge will be mathemati- 
cally accurate, whether individual minerals be 
present in greater or less quantity, or even ab- 
sant altogether. 

The distinctive character of the machine, it 
will be observed, rests on this automatic dis- 
charge arrangement, the jig proper differing in 
no essential from the common plunger jig; 
and it is on this that its value depends. As 
proved by the actual working at Lasalle, the 
jig is capable of separating materials varying 
in specific gravity never so slightly, into any 
required number of divisions; and this, too, 
without the intervention of skilled attention. 
With regard to this latter point, Mr. Engel- 
mann says: 

"It performs a great amount of work en- 
tirely automatically, without the least inter- 
vention of manual labor, surveillance or regu- 
lating, requiring no attendance for weeks and 
months, after having once been adjusted for 
an ore composed of a certain variety of miner- 
als, although these may occur at different 
times, in ever so varying relative proportions. 
It then works unremittingly, performing its 
task in the best possible manner, never miss- 
ing. When the motive power stops it rests 
also, and resumes work without the least dis- 
turbance when the power is again thrown in 
gear. The relative quantity of the different 
minerals in the ore may change ever so much, 
one or more of them may be almost wanting 
for days together, still the machine will work 



on as before, with equally good results, like 
an intelligent being. All that is necessary is 
to supply it with food, with crushed ore, and 
to take away the finished product which it has 
discharged in cars or bins. The machine thus 
enables the operator to dispense with all man- 
ual labor, with its expense and uncertainty. 
There is no need of watching inexperienced or 
unreliable laborers, no shirking, irregularities, 
negligence or strikes, no holidays or pay days." 
That his indorsement is well founded, is 
shown by the general adoption and ready ap- 
preciation' the new invention has met with, in 
so short a time from its first introduction. 
There are, however, only three of them in use 
on this coast, as far as we know, two in Nevada, 
and one in Idaho. 



A New Type-Setting Machine. 

Type setting machines are devices which every 
newspaper proprietor and publisher is desirous 
of seeing perfected, and which every "typo " 
is not. A machine on a new principle has re- 



for the next letter. While this is going on, the 
type passes between revolving cutters and per- 
fectly formed iB pushed on the composing stick 
exactly as if it had been placed there by the 
fingers of a printer. This action is repeated 
with succeeding letters, according to copy, at 
the rate of 40 letters or more a minute, accord- 
ing to the expertness of the operator. 

The circular issued by tho New York Type 
and Electrotype Company, 88 John street, New 
York, describing the invention, states that the 
machine saves the following items: The 
whole cos t of new type; the whole cost of 
distributing type; two-thirds of cost of com- 
position. The machine oan be arranged 
simply for making type by throwing out one 
lever, when it becomes self-acting, and will 
make any designated letter all day at the rate 
of 80 letters per minute. One great advantage 
in a machine of this kind is, that all old type 
and type metal can be used over and over again 




TJTSCH'S AUTOMATIC JIG. 



cently been brought before the public, styled 
Wescott's Type-Making and Setting Machine. 
It casts and sets its own type at the same in- 
stant, taking it as molten metal from a tank 
and leaving it a new and perfect type in the 
stick, as if placed there by a compositor. The 
type is not thrown back into the cases or dis- 
tributed in any manner, and this expense is 
saved. It is simply remelced. On one end of 
the machine is a tank heated by gas, contain- 
ing molten type metal. Parallel with the tank 
are two rows of steel frames, each containing 
the matrix of a letter. Running between these 
steel frames is a traveler. In front of the tank, 
containing the molten type metal, is a heavy 
mould. Connected with the steel frames con- 
taining the matrices, by simple levers, is a key 
board, precisely like that of a piano, with the 
names of each letter marked on the keys. When 
the key, A, is touched, then the matrix, A, is 
pushed three inches out of line, and the trav- 
eler then takes it to the mould in front of the 
tank containing the molten type metal. 

The mould then closes on it, and at the same 
instant the pump in the tank throws a jet of 
the molten type metal which strikes the matrix 
full in the face. The mould then opens and 
the traveler retires with tho matrix, A, ready 



in making new type. The regular price of 
these machines, as stated in the circular, is 
$5,500 with a discount to purchasers of five 
machines and upwards. If all that is claimed 
for this machine in the matter of time and econ- 
omy proves correct, it will be very generally 
introduced, especially in country newspaper 
offices. 



The Utah Silver Lead Co., paid all its ex- 
penses last month and deposited $2,000 in the 
bank besides. They expect to pay dividends with- 
in 60 days. Their sales of ore last month were 
600 tons, with an average of 60 per cent, lead 
and $23 in silver and $5 in gold. They will 
soon commence concentrating and it is expected 
that the ores will then bring $40 on the spot, 
or about $25 per ton profit; they can easily sell 
800 tons per month. 

The North Star mine, Grass Valley, is do- 
ing considerable "dead work," and only 366 
tons of ore were reduced last month. It turned 
out $14,508, and the expenses were $26,500. 



The Newabk Mill will shortly resume 
operations; new machinery and an Aikin fur- 
nace will be added. 



Elmore's Mill in Robinson District, Neva- 
da, will shortly be in operation. 



An Invention Wanted. 

In onr issue of Feb. 22d last, we published 
an item under this head, stating that an appli- 
ance was badly wanted, by means of which a 
telegraphic operator can communicate with, 
or signal a train at any place on the route. 
We have had several letters on the subject, and 
a correspondent asks us this week what such 
signals would be used for, whether for the ac- 
commodations of more trains upon a single 
track to prevent collisions, or to notify en- 
gineers of danger ahead while running, when 
there is a train approaching from an opposite 
direction, etc. Our correspondent asks ub to 
state the needs of railroad men in this matter, 
as far as we know. 

Any system that would fulfill the require- 
ments desired, would not only benefit railroad 
men, but the general public. It has frequently 
occurred that two trains have left different sta- 
tions about the same time, running towards 
each other on a single line of track, without 
either knowing the other was coming. This 
was the case in the instance which elicited 
our remarks ou the subject some time since, 
for the fact that two trains were running to- 
wards each other was known at Elko before 
the collision occurred. A locomotive and 
wrecking-ear were dispatched immedintely, in 
anticipation of the accident. If any contriv- 
ance had been in vogue which would have 
warned the engineer of one or both trains to 
slow up to avoid impending danger, the acci- 
dent would not have occurred. The thing re- 
quired is some system, which would operate 
cheaply and be constructed in such a manner 
that a train may be signalled at any point on 
the line of road. In such a case, if the trains 
should chance to be running towards each 
other, a mere danger-signal which would infal- 
libly attract the notice of some specified person 
on the train, would suffice. Some one sug- 
gested to us not long since the project of 
laying a wire between the tracks from station 
to station, and having an iron rod and a wire 
brush on its lower end pass down from the rear 
car so that the brush should pass over the 
wire continuously. An instrument in the car 
would indicate any signal sent by the telegraph 
operator at either end. The person suggesting 
this device admitted, however, that it would 
be necessary to have the "lightning go after 
the brakeman with a club" to make it success- 
ful; moreover, the friction would wear out the 
brush veiy rapidly and the system would be 
expensive. The advantages of any mechanism 
which would cause an electric signal to give 
warning to a runningHrain are plain to all, and 
some of our ingenious inventors would make 
money by overcoming the difficulties. 



The Water Supply of Virginia City is get- 
ting quite low. A two-horse wagon-load of 
over 450 gallons retails at $3. In Gold Hill 
teams are hauling it from American Flat, and 
it sells for $1 per barrel. It would be rough on 
the inhabitants in warm weather to be short of 
water for domestic purposes. They don't drink 
much of it, up there, however; and it is not 
so bad as if the beer supply was low. The 
Enterprise says the mining interests must suffer 
a little, as, owing to its foaming in the boilers, 
the engineers are afraid to use lager-beer. 
The Carson river is quite low, but the Eureka 
mill, the largest on the river, is yet running 
to its full capacity. The water company will 
supply the city with all it needs within a few 
weeks at farthest. 



34 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, 1873. 



Correspondence. 



Notes of Travel in Eureka County, 
Nevada. 

[By our Traveling Correspondent.] 

Eureka. 

Since my visit to this place one year ago, Eure- 
ka has become the county seat of a new county, 
bearing the same name as that cut off of Lan- 
der County by an act of the last Legislature. 
It is to-day one of the busiest mining camps of 
Eastern Nevada. The district comprising 
Eureka contains about four thousand souls, 
and its location is about 85 miles south of 
Palisade, on the C. P. R. R., or about 658 
miles east of San Francisco, and is situated at an 
elevation of 6,651 feet above tide water. This 
place contains 5 hotels and some 35 mercan- 
tile establishments. Daily and tri-weekly lines 
of stages ply between here and Hamilton, and 
Palisade, also to Elko and Austin. The fare 
from San Francisco to this place is $58 and 
the time required to make the trip is 48 hours. 
A little of the early history of the place may 
not be uninteresting at this time. The 

Discovery of the District 
"Was some time in September, 186 i, when some 
prospectors came in from Austin, which is situ- 
ated 70 miles west from here. They adopted 
laws to govern the district, and a Mr. Tanna- 
hill was elected the first Mining Recorder. 
These prospectors discovered some carbonate 
ores, and made several locations; but in the 
"finds" there was nothing of a high grade 
except some pockets, nevertheless, these 
humble miners succeeded in interesting 
a New York Company, and one small 
furnace was putup, in the summer of 
1866, the remains of which are still visible. 
They met with little success however, having 
not only a poor furnace to contend with at that 
time, but being very distant from their base of 
supplies. This occurred before the C. P. R. R. 
was completed. From this time on, until the 
the great excitement of 

White Pine, 
In the summer of 1869, which brought the 
miners and prospectors again through the dis- 
trict, but little is known. 

In 1866, however, Alonzo Monroe came, and 
located some mines, on what is now known as 
"Mineral Hill." Finding some good ores, 
Mr. Monroe went over to Austin in the summer 
of 1868, and interested Mr. Stetefeldt, of that 
place, with him in the erection of the first 
blast furnace ever built here. In March, 1869, 
the first run with this furnace was made; it 
proved, however, a failure; for after running 
about 2,800 lbs of bullion, this pioneer furnace 
froze up. Attempts to run it proved unsuc- 
cessful, until Major McCoy came over from 
White Pine, bringing with him two Cornish- 
men, named Jones and Williams. These 
gentlemen remodeled Monroe & Stetefeldt's 
furnace, adding more tuyeres, and finally made 
the first successful run of a furnace in the 
district. About that time the 

Champion & Buckeye 
Mines, (which now constitute the "Eureka 
Con. M. Co.") were secured by the second 
pioneer who entered the district, Mr. David 
Buell, who bonded the said mines some time 
in November, 1869, and sent Mr. Isaac Bate- 
man to England, to dispose of the same. He 
interested some English capitalists in the 
enterprise, and they sent out engineers to 
look into it, who reported favorably. Those 
furnishing the capital, however, were not satis- 
fied, but had some experts from California to 
make a report, which was adverse, and the sale 
fell through. As it subsequently proved, they 
lost a valuable purchase. Mr. Buell, undaunted 
by his failure, appealed to San Francisco cap- 
ital, when the present "Eureka Con. M. Co." 
was incorporated, the history of which is too 
familiar to bear repetition— except the develop- 
ment, which I propose to give you in a future 
communication, together with notes on many 
other prominent mines in this district. I will 
however add a little of the early history of an 
adjoining district, known as the 

Secret Canon, 
Which is located about 7% miles south-east of 
Eureka, and was discovered by H. A. Hogdon 
Esq, in August, 1869, -and before Mr. Buell 
created any excitement at Eureka; Mr. Hog- 
don had extracted and shipped (on mules, by 
pack train,) several tons of ore to different 
mills at Austin, in the Reese River district, 
and Shermantown in White Pine district. The 
mine from which he extracted this ore is named 
after himself and known as the 
Hogdon Mine, 
The pioneer or discovery mine of the district;, 
and the one which created the first great ex- 
citement, which brought so many prospectors 
to Eureka district and vicinity in the fall of 
1869. Quite an amount of ore of high grade 
was extracted near the surface of this mine, 
and, as above stated, worked at mills located 
in Austin and at Shermantown. There has 
been but little or no work done on this mine 
for the last two years, until the present season. 
This mine was incorporated in December last 
as the Hogdon Mill and Mining Company, 
with Elliott J. Moore as President, John M. 



Moore as Secretary, and H. A. Hogdon as Su- 
perintendent. 

The Present Development 
Consists of a vertical shaft, 50 feet deep, from 
the bottom of which an incline is run some 
forty feet deeper, exposing a metaliferous 
stratum, with streaks of ore of a high grade, 
indicating a body of ore close at hand. This 
corporation claims one thousand feet in their 
location, 300 feet of which are as fine crop* 
pings as I ever saw. I neglected to state 
that for the first twenty feet in this company's 
shaft they found fine ore; but wishing to de- 
velop it at a greater depth, they are not ex- 
tracting ore, but sinking, working night and 
day-shifts. A subsequent location, known as 
the Geddes & Bertrand, is about 500 feet south 
of the Hogdon; and about one mile northerly 
are located the 

Basey Mines, 

Belonging to an English Company. They are 
situated on a higher range of hills ; have fine 
prospects; and I learn that they will shortly 
start a large force of men to work them. More 
from Eureka District in my next. l. p. mo. 

The Vienna Exposition. 

[By our Special Correspondent— Gumo Kubtel.] 
The American department in the Industrial 
Palace, although not quite ready, was opened 
to the public on the 10th of June. Entering 
the west portal and turning to the right, one 
finds himself in the American gallery, and is 
sure to hear the organs of the Mason & Ham- 
lin Organ Company before he has time to see 
anything. The first that attract the attention 
of the visitor are the excellent 

Photographic Pictures 
In front and to the right, of Leon Van Loo, 
of Cincinnati; Schwind & Krueger, New York; 
Kurtz, New York; also chromo -lithographic 
pictures of Duval & Hunter, from Philadelphia, 
etc. Several cases of gold pens, especially that 
of Morton, of New York, are worth notice. 
Near these, on the wall, hangs a large, beautiful 
gold frame, in which a very rich collection of 
bank-notes is tastefully arranged. Some show 
high amounts, up to $10,000. Among them, 
photographic portraits of Presidents and other 
celebrated Americans are placed. The many 
differently-colored postage stamps, systemati- 
cally placed by themselves, also make a nice 
picture. This very interesting piece is exhib- 
ited by the " National Bank-Note Company," 
Wall street, N. Y. Of 

Musical Instruments 

There are the celebrated organs of Mason, 
Hamlin & Co, and of Estey & Co., of Vermont. 
The only pianos are from Steck, N. Y., and 
one from Hinzen, Rosen & Co., Louisville, 
Ky. A few elegant zithers are also exhibited. 
In a glass case, visible from all sides, hangs a 
violin, the "Emperor violin," made by George 
Gemundcr, N. Y., price $10,000. The ten 
thousand dollars seem to create more attrac- 
tion than the violin itself. Some think it is a 
Yankee trick, but Mr. Gemunder writes that 
the violin is constructed on a certain principle 
which gives clearness to the tone, by which it 
is made equal to the best old Italian violins. 

Franklin, Upton & Co., of Baltimore, ex- 
hibit first-rate leather, tanned by the vacuum 
process. The same article is also exhibited by 
Shayer Brothers, Boston. Several cases show 
neatly-made gaiters, fit for a delicate lady's 
foot, not like the English, with such unnatu- 
rally-high insteps that they look as if they 
were made for crippled feet. Also boots and 
shoes of Boston make, of fine quality, are ob- 
served. Cabinet soaps, perfumes, eau de Mis- 
sissippi, drugs, candles and sugar-coated pills, 
tastefully arranged, contribute to improve our 
exposition. Preserved fruits, vegetables, mack- 
erel and lobsters are also represented. J. 
Mathew's soda-water machines are everywhere 
— iron ones, of a monstrous size — others really 
elegant, suitable for a parlor. There are many 
exhibitors of 

Wines 
And sparkling wines from California; Buena 
Vista, Eberhart & Lachman, and Landsberger. 
Others are from Cincinnati, St. Louis, San- 
dusky and New York. The French took their 
wines away from the Exposition rayon and it 
is said they intend to submit them to the jury 
entirely independently of others. They don't 
like comparative judgment. Eberhardt & 
Lachman's wines came hereby way of Panama 
in perfect order, wines and California Cham- 
pagne clear as crystal. 

A nice assortment of natural and refined oils 
is exhibited by Pease; starch from Ohio, a nice 
case of gloves, N. Y., leather and wooden 
trunks, Hall's magic curtain fixtures, patent 
flexible shirts from New York; also shirts from 
Philadelphia, etc. Several beautiful assort- 
ments of fancy cassimeres from New England 
and Massachusetts are exhibited. Mr. S. 
White, of Philadelphia, shows a grand display 
of dentists' articles; single teeth of all sorts 
and sets without number, splendid tools, a 
chair that admits of any required position, etc. 
Clocks of fine work from New York, globes, 
a model of a counterpoise gun-carriage are also 
amongst the other articles. The Smith & 
Wesson, Remington, Colt, Sharp, Peabody and 
Springfield rifles and revolvers are well repre- 
sented. 

Yosemite Valley Views, 
Of large size, are plenty and very excellent; 
but, of the thousands of spectators, only a few 



know that it iB in California, the majority 
know not whether it means Taheiti or Hawaii. 
There is also a splendid photographic view of 
the intarior of the Lick House, S. F. These 
two letters are so fine that one hardly perceives 
them, and then only one out of ten knows 
what they mean. The photographers proba- 
bly think if they know where they tqok the 
view it is all right. 

Mines and Minerals. 
To the left of the west portal is the continu- 
ation of the American exhibition. The first 
group is poorly represented, especially in silver 
minerals. Those from Utah" are the most 
prominent, the specimens (copper ore inclu- 
ded) are of a proper size, well arranged, each 
provided with a printed label showing the 
value per ton, the mine and mining district. 
There is a case of rare minerals from California, 
Nevada and Arizona, and a small collection of 
Arizona gold and silver ores. That is all, in 
respect to gold and silver ores. From Penn- 
sylvania, cobalt and nickel ores, with bars of 
the relative metals, alloys and some metallic 
salts (as sulphate of nickel, etc.) are exhibited, 
also some galena; then a few iron ore and coal 
collection. The Sutro Tunnel Co. sent a very 
interesting and instructive 

Model of the Comstock Mine, 

In connection with the Tunnel, in sections or 
croBS-cuts^ by which the interior of the ledge 
and the direction of the Tunnel are clearly ex- 
plained. 

In the middle of the gallery is a nice struct- 
ure of bales of cotton, from Mobile, Ala.; on 
top of the bales sugar cane, and on the sides 
all around, silk cocoons, silk, etc. Yesterday, to 
my astonishment, I found out that all those 
cocoons and the silk exposition do not belong 
to Alabama, but to California, and were sent 
by I. Newman This exposition was used with- 
out labels to make a better show of the Ala- 
bama cotton bales. I will try to have it chang- 
ed, or, at least, to attach Mr. Newman's printed 
labels to all of his articles. Some models are 
also exhibited here, one representing a revolv- 
ing roasting, or, perhaps, revolving puddling 
furnace; whoever exposed it knows what it is. 
Another represents a patent deck suspension 
truss, of 245% feet span, of a bridge over the 
Ohio River at Louisville, Ky. There also are 
beautiful photographic views in this depart- 
ment. Above the Utah minerals are views of 
Salt Lake City, the large organ in the Taber- 
nacle and some mining views. Th. House- 
worth, of San Francisco, exhibits Yosemite 
Valley views, etc. Next comes the department 
of 

American " Means of Education," 

Which might be termed, just as well, a "bchool 
library." Besides books, there are some views 
and plans of school-houses; a nice large model 
of the "Franklin school-house;" a few school 
benches or seats; writings and drawings of 
students, and so forth. But of physical in- 
truments, models of machinery, architecture, 
discriptive geometry; anatomical preparations; 
collections of beetles, butterflies and other 
insects, injuring plants or being in close con- 
nection with branches of industry — nothing is 
exposed save a few physical instruments. As 
a "means of elementary education " this de- 
partment is most interesting. A day or two 
since, the " rural school house " was opened. 
Minister Jay was present. The school-room 
contains eight rows of chairs, six in each row. 
The walls are decorated with large maps, pic- 
tures of botany and zoology: on the catheder 
table and benches are exhibited the different pri- 
mary books, geographical and others. Mr. Jack- 
son Schultz delivered a short speech compli- 
menting Mr. Jay for his services rendered in be- 
half of the exposition, to which Mr. Jay respond- 
ed.Professor Hoyt also delivered a longer speech, 
saying that he was prepared to give all possible 
explanation that might be required, etc. In 
absence of little children, the old children per- 
formed the "obligate singing" before and after 
the opening ceremonies. 

I remained a long while in the school-room 
for the purpose of listening to the remarks of 
the different visitors. The isolated seats and the 
very well planned geographies and other school- 
books exhibited on the tables have been much 
praised by visitors of all nations. Everything 
was closely examined, even Hall's curtains; the 
ladies especially took much interest in the 
whole arrangement. 

The covered yard adjoining the gallery is not 
yet ready. There are quite a number of dif- 
ferent sewing-machines, but in closed partitions 
as yet. Several machines in the American de- 
partment of the machinery hall are in motion. 
From the 2d of June to the 8th, 178 cars came 
in with articles for the Exposition, the most 
from France and Switzerland, but also from 
Hungary, England, Italy, Egypt and China. 

The weather of the beginning of June is not 
much better than it was in May, still, the at- 
tendance at the Exposion improved consider- 
ably. J. K,. 

Vienna, June 12, 1873. 



Clean Up. — The Grass Valley Union says: 
The Idaho continues in its great prosperity. 
Last week a six days' run with thirty-five 
stamps gave a clean up of $26,000. This 
clean up was made from the amalgamators, 
the batteries not being touched. The month's 
run of the mill will close this week, and. the 
first Monday in next month declaring the 
usual dividend will be in order. 



The new hoisting works of the Raymond & 
Ely mine are nearly completed. 



City Creek Mines. 

The latest development of minerals in City 
Creek Canon and the country contiguous to it, 
says the Tribune, bids fair to create some ex- 
citement in mining circles; the discoveries so 
far all being within a radius of ten miles of 
Salt Lake City, and some of them, if we are to 
believe the accounts brought to us, being of a 
character to produce more or less of a furore. 

We understand that up to the present writing 
over twenty locations have been made of mines 
containing galena and carbonate ores of average 
richness, and we have heard the opinion ex- 
pressed that the character of the formation is 
such as to justify the highest expectations of 
the richness, extent and permanency of the de- 
posits. 

The existence of galena and iron mines situ- 
ated within ten miles of this city, and approach- 
able at all seasons of the year, and to which, if 
necessary, a railroad can be built with but little 
trouble, is calculated to have a wonderful effect 
on the business interests of the city, and our 
hope is that the fullest expectations of those 
now engaged in developing this new region 
may be realized. 

Having discovered several good ledges, and 
demonstrated the existence of galena and car- 
bonate ores, we trust that the work of proBpec- 
ting will be carried on vigorously during "the 
summer monthB, so that whatever mines may 
be discovered can be thoroughly worked the 
coming winter. 

When so much of our prosperity depends on 
increasing our ore products, thereby adding to 
our revenue, discoveries like those announced 
on City Creek ought to be a source of gratifica- 
tion to every business man in the city. With- 
out being too enthusiastic over the reports 
brought to us, there is still enough to warrant 
the statement that City Creek mines may be 
our next excitement. 



The Sierra Mate" Tunnel. 

This work, recently commenced by an Eng- 
lish Company, -with an original capital of 
$5,000,000, says the Colorado Herald, is being 
steadily pushed forward into the mountains 
by Col. Heaton, President and Superintendent. 
This scheme is certainly the grandest and most 
extensive private enterprise ever inaugurated 
in the tunnel or perhaps any other line, and 
seems almost too stupendous an undertaking 
for completion. The plan is to drive a tunnel 
20 feet wide by 12 high from a point on North 
Clear Creek nearly two miles below Black 
Hawk, through the heart of the main Rocky 
Mountain Range into Middle Park, a distance 
of twelve miles, cutting the various mines that 
lie in its course, and to construct and operate 
a railroad in the same. The tunnel will pass 
through Bob Tail and Gregory Hills, pass be- 
neath Central City, and through the Gunnel 
Hill. At the latter point a branch tunnel will 
diverge and pass under Nevada and Quartz Hills, 
while the main work will continue direct to 
Middle Park. The above hillB and locations, 
with their numberless rich and exhaustless gold 
bearing lodes, will be penetrated at a depth of 
from 1,200 to 2,400 feet below the surface. 
The mouth of the tunnel, where -work is now 
going on, is some 7,000 feet above sea level, or 
nearly 2,000 feet above Denver, and the Middle 
Park entrance of the work will be nearly 8,000 
feet above tide water. The main range through 
which this huge bore will pass, has an elevation 
of from 12,000 to 14,000 feet. Before the pres- 
ent capital of the Company is exhausted, which 
will not be for over two years, the Bob Tail, 
Gregory, and other neighboring mines will be 
cut, after which time it is expected that the 
profits of the enterprise will be sufficient to 
ensure its completion. At all events, should 
the Company have reasonable success, we be- 
lieve they will drive the work to points through 
Quartz and Gunnel Hills, which will include 
the best of the mining sections of the line pro- 
jected as far as known. 

Immensely. Rich Gbayel. — We learn that the 
old Mullins & Ryan tunnel, below the Junc- 
tion, has finally been run through to gravel, 
and that unprecedentedly large prospects are 
obtained. As the channel has but just been 
reached we are unable to state its width. The 
gravel prospects as high as fifteen dollars to 
the pan. There is a little episode connected 
with the history of the mine that aptly illus- 
strates the uncertainty of mining . ventures : 
Mr. Mullins, one of the original locators of the 
claim, worked for years running the tunnel — 
which is about 800 feet in bedrock hard as ad- 
amant — but become involved and was obliged 
to give up the mine before reaching gravel. 
Broken down in health by the severe labor he 
had performed, and driven by necessity to seek 
employment, Mullins went to work in the tun- 
nel for wages, the new proprietor having con- 
cluded to run it ahead. He had been at work 
only about three weeks when he struck through 
into the channel, developing the rich gravel 
mentioned above. Who can imagine the feel- 
ings of Mullins, who, after laboring for years, 
was forced to relinquish work when a hard 
earned fortune was within his grasp ? Such 
outrageous fortune as that is enough to drive 
a man to hard drink, but it is by no means 
an uncommon incident among those who woo 
the fickle goddess with the pick and drill. — 
Calaveras Chronicle. 



The first week's run of the St. John quick- 
silver mine, completed this week, resulted in 
the filling of fifty flasks of quicksilver, valued 
at $3,825, The furnace used is a new inven- 
tion. 



July 19, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



35 



iciENTiFic Progress. 



Position of the Planets for July. 

The Observatory of Vassar College furnishes 
the Scientific American with a monthly state- 
ment of the position of k the*planets. We con- 
dense the following for July: 

Mebcuby rises on the 1st of July at (Jh. 18m. 
A. M., and seta at 9 P. M. 

Vents was at its greatest brilliancy on the 
10th of Jnne, at which time it was easily seen 
at noonday, and a gloss of low power showed 
it as a beautiful'crescent. In the first half of 
Jnly, it will pans the meridian a little before 
nine in the morning, rising on the 1st at about 
2 in the morning, and setting at near 4 P. II, 
Macs rises on the 1st at 30 minutes after 
noon, and sets a tittle after 4 in the morning. 
On the 31st it rises at lh. lOni. P. M., and safe 
at 11 P. M. Mars is easily known by its ruddy 
light, and can be seen in tho southwest after 
twilight. But little cau be seen of its pecul- 
iarities with a small telescope, although a pow- 
erful one will show very decided markings on 
its disk. 

Jr/ptTEB is still conspicuous in the evening 
sky among the stars of Leo. On the 1st of July 
it rises at 8h. 39m., and sets at lOh. 12m. It 
is much less favorably situated for observation 
than in the winter, and very few of the pheno- 
mena of its statellites are visible in this local- 
ity for the whole month. 

Satubn is more favorably situated for obser- 
vation, but is so far south that it does not 
reach, when on the meridian, an altitude of 
mnch more than 27°. It will be best seen at 
midnight on the 22d of July, rising on the 1st 
at 8h. 48m. P. M., and setting at tih. 14m. the 
next morning. 

Ubanus is still very unfavorably situated for 
observation, rising in the morning and setting 
at 9 P. M. on the 1st of July. 

Neptune rises between 12 and 1 A. M. on 
the 1st of July, and sets a little before 2 P. M. 
Meteors and Sun Spots. — Meteors were fre- 
quent on May 1st, but have thus far (June 
18th) been rare in this month. It has also been 
a very remarkable period for the absence of 
sun spots. No spot could be found on the 
sun's Burface ( glass of low power being used) 
from June 13th to June 17th. On June 18th a 
very small one was perceived. 

New Planets Discovebed in 1872. — Since 
the beginning of last year, twelve small planets 
have been discovered, as follows: 

Peitho, discovered at Bilk, by R. Luther, 
March 15. 

A not yet named planet, discovered at Ann 
Arbor, Mich., by Watson, April 3, 

Lachesis, discovered at Marseilles, by Borelly, 
April 10, 

A not yet named planet, discovered at Ann 
Arbor, by Watson, May 12. 

Oerda, Brunhilda and Alceslis, discovered at 
Clinton, N. Y., by C. H. P. Peters, the two 
first on July 31, and the last on August 23. 

A not yet named planet, discovered at Paris t 
by Prosper Henry, September 11, and two oth- 
ers, at the same observatory, by Paul Henry, 
November 5. 

A not yet known planet, at Ann Arbor, by 
Watson, November 25, and another at Clinton, 
N. Y., by C. H. F. Peters, on February 5, 1873. 

Proper Combinations in Soaps. — According 
to Mignot, a perfect soap is one in which the 
fatty matters and the alkaline have been so 
thoroughly combined as to leave no excess of 
either component; a desideratum which is very 
seldom reached, as the soap is either too alka- 
line, in which case it parches and dries up the 
skin, or it is too fat, and thus makes the skin 
greasy, so that the dust readily adheres to it. 
The former inconvenience is the more serious 
of the two, as it very soon leaves its impres- 
sion upon the skin. For this reason soap- 
makers are in the habit of employing an excess 
of fat, notwithstanding the inconvenience men- 
tioned. Mignot now informs us that silica 
introduced into the soap, in the form of infu- 
sorial earth, will tend to neutralize any excess 
of the alkaline elements of the soap, as it is 
soluble both in soda and in potash, and it will, 
at the same time, take up the surplus matter by 
absorbing it, and combining with it to a certain 
extent. Infusorial earth, as is well known, 
occurs in different parts of the world in great 
quantity, and immense deposits are known in 
various portions of the United States, espe- 
cially in Idaho, Nevada and California. It is 
the same substance as that now so extensively 
employed as a polishing powder under the 
name of electro-silicon. 



26.90 



Govebnmbnt Aid to Science. — Government 
has wisely responded to the urgent solicitations 
of engineers and the engineering press through- 
out the country in appropriating $100,000 for 
the purpose of continuing the experimental 
investigations upon steam boiler explosions, 
commenced by the Franklin Institute in 1835, 
and very ably extended by Col. Stephens, in 
the highly instructive experimental explosions 
during the last year at Sandy Hook. The ex- 
periments authorized by this very liberal ap- 
propriation will be made in part at Sandy 
Hook, and in part at Pittsburg or Cincinnati 
— each being under the charge of a committee 
of five engineers. The information which may 
thus be obtained may prove of inestimable pub- 
lic benefit, and we shall look forward to the in- 
auguration of the experiment with great inter- 
est. 



Hardening of Dried Peas In Boiling. 

While some peas become soft in boiling, 
others become horny and hard, and.it has been 
a question whether this is due to the peas 
or to the water. Prof. Ritthausen ex- 
amined two samples of peas, one said to be- 
come soft on boiling, and the other hard, and 
on boiling them in distilled water found these 
characters substantiated. The analysis of their 
ashes gave ; 

Soft. Bard. 

Phospbato of lime 10.771 lfl ,. 10.411 

Phosphate of magtieaU 8.14 j 10 * 1 16.65( 

Phosphate of potaua 69.74 37.43 

Sulphatu Of potasea 3,10 14.80 

Chli-ridu of potassium 4.73 6.23 

Potaab 11.47 

Phosphoric acid 4.43 

From this we see that the soft-boiling peas 
contain a considerably greater amount of phos- 
phate of potausu, a smaller percentage of 
phosphatic earths, and more phosphoric acid 
than the other kind, which, for their part, are 
richer in the earth phosphates, poorer in other 
phosphoric compounds, and contain an excess 
of potash. 

In the action of water on those peas poor in 
phosphoric acid, that hardened on boiling, the 
legumine, which is present in large quantity, 
although partially combined with the excess of 
potash, has also its function. It is decompos- 
ed, with the separation of a compound of lime 
or magnesia, which becomes horny on heating 
and brings about the hardening referred to. 
Cold water extracts from those peas that boil 
soft, 4.24 per cent of soluble legumine, while 
from the hard boiling kinds only 1.73 per cent 
can be derived. The difference in the amounts 
of nitrogen and sulphur was so slight, that the 
hardening could not be ascribed to a larger 
amount of albumen, or of sulphuric acid. 
Some kinds of peas, however, represented as 
hardening on boiling, softened when boiled in 
distilled water; and analysis of their ashes 
gave nearly the same results as with those of 
the other character. 



An Intebesting Chemical Expeelment. — To 
prove that the inner, dark portion of an illum- 
inating flame contains combustible gases, the 
general practice is to insert into that part of 
the flame a glass tube, so inclined that a por- 
tion of these gases shall rise into it, and there- 
upon igniting them at the farther extremity of 
the tube, or leading the contents of the tube 
by an aspirator into a convenient vessel, when 
its combustibility can then be directly tested. 
Mr. Heuman has communicated to the German 
Chemical Society another method, and a sim- 
pler one, of accomplishing the result, which 
seems worthy of notice. 

He recommends taking advantage of the 
well-known fact that a mixture of about 4 parts 
of chlorate of potass* and 1 part of strontium 
nitrate, heated to fusion, will burn with a very 
intense flame in hydrogen or illuminating gas, 
when once the ignition of the oxygen liberated 
from this mixture is effected by contact with 
a flame. 

To perform this very pretty experiment, the 
author states that it is only necessary to fuse a 
small quantity of the mixture in question in a 
little spoon at the apex of a luminous gas 
flame, and then to lower it into the dark por- 
tion, when a brilliant combustion will imme- 
diately ensue; while, when removed to the lu- 
minous portion of the flame, or taken alto- 
gether out of it, is is at once extinguished. 

Agassiz on Development. — In the recent 
series of lectures on embryological develop- 
ment, Prof. Agassiz declared the development 
theory of Darwin a daring assumption. He 
maintained that many of the lower animals 
were introduced under more highly organized 
forms than they have ever shown since, and 
have dwindled afterward. The following is 
one of his more explicit declarations: 

I believe that all these correspondences be- 
tween the different aspects of animal life are 
the manifestations of mind acting consciously 
with intention toward one object from begin- 
ning to end. This view is in accordance with 
the working of our minds; it is an indistinc- 
tive recognition of a mental power, with which 
our own is akin, manifesting itself in nature. 
For this reason more than any other, perhaps, 
do I hold that this world of ours is not the re- 
sult of the action of unconscious organic 
forces, but the work of an intelligent, conscious 
power. 

Making Hydbofluoeic Acid. — Hydrofluoric 
acid is produced by the action of sulphuric acid 
on fluor spar in a platinum or lead retort. One 
of the troubles connected with its production 
is an extremely hard residuum which is left in 
the retort, and which cannot be removed with- 
out great difficulty. Mr. A. P. Stuart, how- 
ever, has obviated this disagreeable conse- 
quence by employing, instead of fluor spar, a 
mixture of equal parts of fluor opar and gyp- 
sum. The residue left behind in this process 
may readily be removed by the application of 
water. 

Effect of Sunlight on Floue. — It is main- 
tained that the inferior quality of eertain kinds 
of wheat and rye flour is frequently due to the 
action of sunlight on the flour; even when in 
bags or barrels the gluten experiences a change 
similar to that occasioned by heating in the 
mill. The tendency thus imparted to it, to be- 
come lumpy, and to form dough without 
toughness, is similar to that of flour from 
moist grain, or of flour when it is too fresh, or 
made from grain ground too early, or when 
adulterated with cheaper barley meal. Such 
flour can be improved by keeping for some 
weeks. 



Effects of Sulphub Wateb on Ibos Pipes 
— Dr. E. Priwoznik, in D'mgler's Journal, says 
It appears that, when the iron mains convey- 
ing the mineral water from a source near 
Hainbarg, Austria, were taken up after hav- 
ing been for more than a dozen years under- 
ground, the iron thereof had been strongly 
acted upon, as exhibited by the difference in 
structure upon the fracture. On being ana- 
lysed, the author found the interior layer to 
consist, in 100 part6, of: Hydrated oxide of 
iron, 81*08; free sulphur, 12-29; sulphuret of 
iron, 4*48; hygroscopic water, 0'57; nickel, 
cobalt, magnesia, silica, traces of carbon, and 
chlorides of ammonium and sodium, 1-58. 
The second layer was found to contain only 
79* per cent of iron, but no sulphuret or excess 
of carbon was discovered; while the third 
outmost layer was almost pure cast iron. 

Exhalation of Cabbonic Acid Gas. — The 
Archiu far Physiologic contains an account of 
Aubert and liange's interesting researches on 
the quantity of carbonic aoid exhaled in a 
given time from the skin of a man. The ex- 
periments were carefully made in an air-tight 
chamber, in which the subject for experiment 
was seated, and through which a current of 
air, freed from carbonic acid, was steadily 
passing, while the proportion of carbonic acid 
in the air on leaving the chamber was estimated 
by transmission through bulbed tubes contain- 
ing a solution of salt of barium. The result 
of these novel investigations leads to the gen- 
eral conclusion that sixty-two grains of car- 
bonic acid — a considerable amount, certainly — 
are exhaled from the body of a fullgrown man, 
through the skin, in the course of twenty-four 
hours. 

Reducing the Intensity of a Negative. — 
According to Lesalle, a negative can be dimin- 
ished in intensity by first washing it and then 
covering it with a solution containing 15 grains 
of chloride of gold and .53 of a quart of water. 
The operation is to be repeated until the plate 
has obtained a proper tone. A quantity of 
nitric acid is then to be poured on one corner, 
enough to cover the whole plate, when the 
silver is immediately disolved and almost 
instantly disappears. It is then to be re- 
enforced with sulphate of iron, and then 
reappears with a great degree of transparency. 
Pyrogallic acid may be made use of to bring it 
up both to the desired degree of intensity and 
to that of transparency. The image which 
remains after the application of the nitnc acid, 
on account of its great transparency, is well 
adapted for taking large pictures. 



ECHANICAL 



!R0GRES& 



Steam as a Fibe-Extinguishes. — Dr. 
Weidenbusch \ of Wiesbaden highly recom- 
mends steam as a fire-extinguisher, and sug- 
gests experiments as to the best method of 
employing it, as well by the use of portable 
boilers (where the connecting pipes would 
produce the chief difficulty) as by pipes and 
boilers arranged for each building. As an il- 
lustration of its efficiency, he gives the case of 
a factory about 196 feet long and 33 feet wide, 
the garret of which was filled with rags, shav- 
ings, leather scraps, &c, in which, when the 
fire was detected, half the length of the roof 
was burning. The fire ^apparatus arrived 
about an hour afterward, and the extinguish- 
ing appliances of the building itself were so 
defective that the whole roof was in flames and 
had fallen in, and the lower story was on fire 
in different places. About 2% hours after the 
outbreak of the fire a steam boiler, separated 
from the building, and not in use for some 
hours, was fired up with wood, and the cast- 
iron pipes were cut by a daring carpenter who 
entered the room of the burning building. The 
effect was instantaneous. The room, filled with 
the steam issuing under high pressure, (which, 
however, he does not consider essential), soon 
darkened, one portion after another ceased to 
burn; even the heaps of rags in the garret, 
with free access of air, were gradually extin- 
guished, and after half an hour all danger was 
regarded as past. The effect was too marked 
to be ascribed to the fire-engines operating 
during the same time, and the firemen were 
more and more impressed with the fact that 
their labor was superfluous as the steam came 
into play. 

New Mechanical Movements. — Among the 
collateral benefits of the competition of the 
inventors with reference to improvements in 
canal navigation, is the discovery of two new 
mechanical movements. One of these is a 
wheel revolving upon a central universal joint; 
the other is a telescopic shaft surrounded by a 
sleeve vibrating upon trunnions. In the prac- 
tical device, a shaft, driven by two small 
engines, each 2% horse-power, with dead points 
at right angles to each other, extends from the 
deck of the canal boat to the shore, but being 
hinged near the engines, is capable of being 
raised or lowered, as occasion may require. 
The revolution of the shaft turns a cogged 
wheel, to whose centre it is attached by the 
universal joint. The cogs of the wheel fall 
into those of a permanent track laid on low 
supporters along the canal bank. The fixed 
leverage of a rail track is thus obtained with- 



Incrustation of Locomotive Bollebs from 
the use of impure water, even in ordinarily 
favorable localities, has become so serious 
and expensive a matter that it has been purposed 
to construct extensive reservoirs for the col- 
Kction and storage of rain water, instead of 
employing wells. When the rainfall is 40 in- 
ches, and the passage of 20 locomotives a day 
is required to do the work of the road, a roof 
or collecting surface of five acres, would be re- 
quired at intervals of every five miles ; and 
yet the opinion was expressed, by a committee 
appointed for such investigation, at the last 
meeting of the Master Mechanics' Association 
at Baltimore, that the cost thus incurred would 
be less than that required for keeping boilers 
in repair from injury sustained from incrusta- 
tion. The annual cost of repairs in a locomo- 
tive boiler, made necessary by the use of im- 
pure water is set down by the committee at 

The Comraitte has no faith in any of the 
patent devices which are advertised as sure 
preventatives to incrustation. The only effect- 
ual remedy is to] use pure water. Some at- 
tempts have been made to purify water im- 
pregnated with mineral substances before it 
is allowed to enter the boiler, but theVesults 
have been indifferent. They believe that re- 
pairs are made necessary and boiler ex- 
explosions are sometimes occasioned by the 
incrustations dropping from the over heated 
plates, and permitting the water to come sud- 
denly in contact with the hot surface, thereby 
generating immense volumes of steam, which 
produce the concussion that ruptures the 
boiler. 

Machine fob Testing the Value of Lubbi- 
cants.— Prof. R. H. Thurston, of the Stevens 
Technological Institute of Hoboken, N. J., has 
invented and patented a simple device for tes- 
ting the comparative value of lubricants. It 
gives the amount of friction, pressure or bearing, 
and temperature of journal box at any time 
while in operation, and the readings of the 
same are to be taken at short intervals during 
the teBt. By the testing powers of this device, 
builders of various descriptions of machinery, 
may determine and select the peculiar kind of 
lubricant best suited to the different classes of 
maohinery which they are offering to the pub- 
lic. 

Thus sewing machine builders, who require 
a lubricant of long endurance and small fric- 
tional resistance and viscosity, can make a 
proper selection. So of locomotives, which 
require a lubricant that will bear high pressure 
for the greatest length of time without heating, 
etc. The relative power of lubricants for resis- 
ting high temperatures without decomposition, 
is another important point that may be tested. 

The device promises to be one of much value 
to machine builders and others, in thus enab- 
ling them to decide upon the economy and 
fitness of this quite expensive and very impor- 
tant adjunct to the successful running of 
machinery. Master mechanics can obtain per- 
mission to construct and use the machine, on 
application to the inventor. 

Hot-gilding of Ibon. — The process of hot- 
gilding of iron, and similar metals, has been 
lately much simplified by Kirchmann, who 
produces gilt designs which are very uniform, 
and which bear polishing. This is done by 
rubbing the surface with soda-amalgam (which 
amalgamates it immediately, even if the sur- 
face be ozidized), and then quickly applying a 
concentrated solution of chloride of gold, and 
expelling the mercury by the heat of a lamp or 
furnace. Similar results may be obtained with 
platinum and silver salts. 

New Plan fob Removing Sand Babs. — A 
method of removing sand bars from rivers, in- 
vented and patented by Alfred Garnham, of 
St. Louis, Mo., consists in anchoring a cable 
under water, and providing the cable with 
angular arms, so arranged that the force of the 
stream will actuate the arms, make them re- 
volve and beat up the sand, which is swept 
away, as fast as loosened, by the current. 

The St. Gothabd Tunnel. — Active'progress 
is being made upon this important work, about 
800 workmen being constantly employed. At 
the end of March last the tunnel had reached a 
distance of 806 feet. The work at that time 
was greatly retarded by the unusual amount of 
water, which found its way from every direc- 
tion into the excavation, amounting to about 
1,100 gallons per minute. 

A steam wagon is to run from Nashville to 
Pulaski, Tenn., commencing regular trips in 
October next. 



A Telescopic Comet is now attracting the 
attention of astronomers. On the7thinst.it 
appeared as a faint nebulous mass, its position 
being 4 hours 7 minutes right ascension, and 4° 
34' south declination. We are not told whether 
it will come near enough to be seen with the 
naked eye. It is to be hoped that the spectro- 
scope may be so brought to bear upon it as to 
give us some new facts with regard to this sin- 
gular class of heavenly bodies. 

Asphaltum deposits abound in the southern 
portion of this State and the supply is practi- 
cally inexhaustible. A very large deposit has 
lately been found near Rincon Point, in Ven- 
tura county, which is said to be from six to fif- 
teen feet thick and covered with soil to the 

out the need of a heavy weight, like that of a I depth of eight or ten feet. It is in close prox- 

locomotive, to procure the necessary_adhesion. I imity to the ocean. 



36 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July ig, 1873. 



Table of Fluctuations. 

Showing Highest and Lowest " Regular " Sales of Mining Stocks on the Board List of the 
San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, during the last Four Weeks, togetfier 
with Number of Feel, Shares, Last Dividends and Assessments. 



NAM £ OF COMPASI 



WASHOE. 

Alamo Gold and Silver M. Co 
Alpha Consolidated 

Alto "■■: * 

American Flat. 

Arizona & Utah ............ 

Bacon Mill and Mining Lo. 
Baltimore Consolidated. . . 

Belcher 

Beat& Belcher 

Bowers 

Buckeye 

Bullion ..... . — ■•■■ •■■■••■■ 

Caledonia Silver Mining Co. 

Central ■- 

Central No. Two 

Chollar-Potoai . . . ... ■.■-■-. 

Confidence Silver Mining Co. 

Cons. Gold Hill Quartz 

Consolidated Virginia 

Cook & Geyer. . ........ ■=,- m;. 

Crown Point Gold and S. M 

Daney 

Dardanelles 

Eclipse 

Empire Mill and Mining Co. 

Exchequer 

Flowery 

Franklin 

Globe ,;;:••■■.;;:■. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining 

Hale & Norcross 

Imperial 

Indus 

Insurance . . ■ . w - - 

Julia Gold and Silver M. Co. 

Justice ■■ 

Kentuck 

Knickerbocker 

Lady Bryan 

McMeans . - : ■ . 

Mint Gold and Silver Mining 

Nevada ■ ■■ •:•■,■■•* 

New York Consolidated... 

Occidental 

Ophir Silver Mining Co... 
Overman Silver Mining Co 

Phil. Sheridan 

Pictou ■"■•■• 

Rock Island 

Savage 

Segregated Belcher 

Segregated Caledonia 

Senator Silver Mining Co. 

Sierra Nevada 

Silver Hill 

South Overman 

Succor Mill and Mining Co 

Sutro 

Trench 

Union" "Consolidated 

Woodville Gold and S. M. . . . 
Yellow Jacket 



4 



NEVADA. 

Adams Hill 

Alps Silver Mining Co 

Amador Tunnel and Mining. 
American Flag Mill and M. . 

Arkansas 

Belmont 

Bowery -. — 

Chapman Mill and Mining.. 
Charter Oak Silver Mining. . 

Chief of the Hill 

Chief East Extension 

Columbus Mill and Mining. . 

Condor 

Eureka Consolidated 

ExcelBior 

Harper Silver Mining Co — 

Hermes 

Home Ticket 

Huhn & Hunt Silver Mining 
Ingomar Silver Mining Co.. 

Ivahhoe 

Jackson 

Juniata Consolidated 

Kentucky Gold and Silver. . . 

Kinston. 

Lehigh 

Lillian Hall 

Louise 

McMahon 

Marion 

Meadow Valley 

Mocking-Bird 

Monitor Belmont 

Murphy 

Newark Silver Mining Co 

Pacific Tunnel and Mining. . 
Page & Panaca Silver Mining 

Pea vi 111.' 

Phoenix 

Pioche Silver Mining Co 

Pioche "West Extension 

Pioche-Phcenix 

Portland 

Raymond & Ely 

Silver Peak 

Silver "West Consolidated 

Standard Mill and Mining. . . 

Star Consolidated 

Starlight 

Sterling 

Spring Mount 

SpringMountain Tunnel 

WardBeecher •. 

"Washington and Creole 

Yellowstone 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine 

Bellevue 

Calaveras Goid Mining Co 
Cederberg Gold Mining Co 

Consolidated Amador 

Cottonwood Oreek 

Dunderberg Mill and Mining 
El Dorado Ind. Quartz M. 

Eureka Gold Mining Co 

Gillis 

Independent Gold Mining 

Keystone Quartz 

Mt. Jefferson , 

Oakville Qucrl-z Mining Co 

Rye Patch 

St. Lawreuce Mill and M. Co. 

St. Patrick 

Tecumseh 

Yule Gravel 



IDAHO. 

Empire 

Golden Chariot 

Ida Ellmore 

Mahogany G. and S. Mining 
Minnesota Gold and Silver. 

Red Jacket 

South Chariot 

"War Eagle 



WHITE PINE. 

General Lee 

Mammoth Silver Mining Co 

Noonday 

Original Hidden Treasure. . 

Silver "Wave 

WardBeecher 



UTAH. 

Deseret Consolidated. . , , 
Wellington 



6000 

30000 
[8000 
24000 
5-1000 
lui 

::w 

5U0O 

MWUIJ 

2O0Q0 

10800 
21)000 
28000 
249(10 
20000 
286O0 



Lwitino 
24000 
24000 
25000 
50000 

12000 



27, July, "II 
16," July, "'73 



39, Feb., '72 
1, May, '65 



5, Mch. 1, '71 

1," May 17," 73 
5, Jun,e 16, '1? 

3," June" 3,m 



7, Jan. 21, 73 
45, Aug. 6, '72 
4, Feb. 5, '73 



4, Feb. 13, '73 
10, Mar. 18, '73 



32, July, '73 
" July, '63 



:.; 

48(10(1 
16000 
100000 

■36000 

30000 

21000 
24000 

' 36000 

Simon 

.,11(11)11 

36000 

tw-im 



240O0 
L6000 

•ilthi 

10000 

24000 



25, Aug., '71 



25000 

5O0O0 



30000 
80000 



5, June, '73 



30000 
40000 

soooo 

500O0 

.jlilUlii 



30000 
15000 
3Q000 
30000 
30000 
60000 
30000 



40000 
30O00 
50000 
20000 
35000 
40000 



12000 
20000 
20000 
24OO0 



25000 

lWII.ni 
-5111.111 



20000 
30000 
10000 



25000 

1 ■ 

llllKJII 

10000 
20000 



20000 
36000 

20000 
■J 1333 



15, June 11. 
1, Sept. 4, 

6, May 28, '73 
6, May 28, '73 



1873. 



WEEK EKBINO WEDH^ESDAT 



W £■ 



13,Juneir,|'73 
9, June 26, '"" 



36, Oct., '70 
36. April, '71 
30, June, "" 



8, June 24, ' 
36, April 17," 
1, Dec, 24, " 



3, June J3„ : 

2, May 6, : 
1, Mch. 12, ' 
15, Jan. 4, r 



May 5, r 

Mch. 4, ' 

Mch. 3, ' 

M;iy 2:!, " 

. May 28, ' 

2, April 26, : 

1, Sept. 12, ' 

i,'june"20,'' 
1, Jan. 27, ' 

4, May 10, ' 



Mch. 1, 
. Dec. 12, 
6, June 25, 
I, Jan. 17, 
6, June 2, 
1, Aug, 26, ' 



17, July, '73 
Mch.',"73 



22, Feb., '73 



4, Feb., '73 
" April, '73 



9, July, '73 



9, April, 



Mch., 
_. Feb., 
1, Aug., 



40, July 1, '73 
16, Apr. 8, '7" 

1," May" 5' "'73 
14. June 9, '73 
6, June 24, '73 
10, Apr. 25, '73 
5, Mch. 24, """ 



4, May 31, ' 
1, Feb. 8, ' 
26, June 24,' 
26, June 4, ' 



3, June 19, 
1, June 20, 
9, Apr. 5, 
■1, July 20, 



3, Dec. 23, '72 

4. May 6. '73 
1, June 4, '73 
" June 3, "73 

Jan. 18, '73 



2, Jan. 23, f 

3, Sept. 15 ' 

4, June 19, ' 
1, Dec. 9, ' 
7, May 30, ' 
' Dec. 5, ' 



4, Apr, 10, '73 



Feb. 3, 
,. May 12, 
11, May 23, 

Feb. 21, 

May 16, 
May 6, 

May 6, 



J, April 3,' 
4, June 10, ' 

1, May 16. ' 
3, June 19, ' 



July 15, ' 
. Jan. 15, ' 
6, June 20, ; 



8, April 25, '73 



May 13, '73 
_, April 14, '73 
3, Feb. 12, '73 



1, July 20, '72 
3, Apr. 2, '73 

4,"bec.l8, '72 



1, Mch. 11, '73 

" Oct. 31, '72 

I, May 28, '73 

3, June 4, '73 



3, April 10, '73 
", May 20, '73 
', Moh. 25, '73 
9, June 11, "" 

6, May 21, 

. May "23! .. 
1, Nov. 4, '72 



6, Jan. 9, 

12, Mch. 3, '73 
14, May 31, " 
8, Oct. 9, 



1, Nov. 21,. '72 



8U ■J'i 



m 
19" 'ie& 



m& 53 
1% 7 



6 5^ 
5M 4M 
105a 9^ 



July a 



B ? 



103 92.^ 
« iVe 



i'H l&i 



6ti 5«, 
5< 53 
7 6« 



108'. 1110 
1M 1}. 



m 1% 

KA 11 

44>4 40 

aa sh ex 



Vi 8 

nit \m 

m 3»j 



5 *H 

sa 9 
'2* "m 

1?6 l'j 
13 Ilg 



189 
55J4 



1 

10,'< 



1* 



va 1 
h" "Si* 



14M 12), 



30o 25c 
1>A 2)* 



IS 1 

40o 25c 

35c 25c 
9,!« 8!™ 
VA V-A 
4 3)1, 



15 61 
1« V4 



15 11 

5 t>4 

mi sm 

10)i 8)-, 

4 3M 



July 16 



ISA 14 



101,'j 



B £ 

i s 



s 

81 
»H 

"iii 
..... 

5 

i% 

Ii!!':. 



'99 ' 100 

m 'a 



vl 



V4 Hi 1M 

log va "M g« 

W/i 9ij 9« 9 

■ S 3« 2« 



1)4 1M 



4 
30)5 
31)4" 



39c 30c 

50c 37c 

158" 127 

55- 50 

■75" 'so' 

10-14 10 

20 19)1 



2!*' 2t: 
40c~ 15c 



12)6 10. 

rei "m 



3'.; i>.i 

7 l i! c ffi^c 



1,% w 

50c 30c 

50c 20c 

9M S% 

iii 3>j 



1 75c 

'i% "iii 



11 10M 

4 3)J 
2% 2)4 



lll'.f. 50c 
lD'i II) 
20)4 20 



■M liX, 

'tS "iii 



10c 10c 

'•i» "iii 



40c 40c 

i'w 'ii'A 



VA 5« 



i2 60 
1« 1)4 



50c 50c 
18)4 18)4 
4)4 4)2 






10 
29)4 
5X 



1« t. 

t 4 

26)4 20 

33)4 29 



21 18 
50c 50c 
2 IS 



m v. 

3 , 2?1 
tiii 5 



12 11)4 
'«'.' "iii 



l?i 1 
-i'i 1 ..■ ;!u^- 

45c 40c 



3% 

63" 'i 
« IS 



21 21 

"iii "i' 



•A 'A 

20 10)4 

4M i'A 

H>4 VA 



a 

a 

B 



ASSESSMENT S, MEETINGS, DIVIDENDS. 

A Shareholders' Directory— Compiled Daily for the Mining Press. 
NoTE.~In the Stock EoardB an assessment is delinquent thirty days from the dat* of levy, excluwurat off 
that date. The delinquent dates given in this list are those of the mining; offices. 

ASSESSMENTS.— Stocks on the Lists of the Boards. 

Location. No. Ami. Levied. Delinq'nt. Sale. Secretary. Place of Business.. 



Company. 

Amador Tunnel M. Co. Ely District 

A. merIcanFla« M. «&M. Co. »ElyDiat. 

Arizona & Utah 

Baltimore Con. M. Co. "Wasboe. 

Bellevue M. Co. Placer Co., CaL 

Buckeye G. & S. M. Co-B Washoe. 

Caledonia S. M. Co Nevada. 

Chief of the Hill M. Co. Ely District. 

Consolidated Vir^'nia M. Co. "Washoe. 

Chief East Extension M. Co. 

Daney G. A S. Co. 

EI Dorado Quar1zM.Co. 

Empire M. & M. Go. 

Globe M. Co- 

Gould & -lurry S.M. Co. 

Golden Chariot M, Co. 

Hale A Norcross S. Ml Co. 

Julia G. & S. M. Co. 

Justice M. Co. 

Jackson M. Co. 

Kentucky G. & S. M. Co. 

Kentucky G. M. Co. 

Lady Franklin G. & S. M. Ca 

Mahopany G & S- M. Co. 

McMahon S. M. Co. 

Minnesota M. Co. 

New York Cons- M. Co. 

Nonnday M. Co. 

Ophir M. Oo. 

Overman SM. Co. 

PhenixS. M^Co 

Pictou M. Co. 

Pioche Phenix M. Co. 

Pioche "West Ex. 

Rock Island G.M.Co. 

Senator S. M. Co. 

Silver "West Con. M. Co. 

South Chariot M. Co. 

Spring Mountain Tnimel Co. Nev. 

Star Con. M. Co. Nevada, 

Teoiimseh; G A S. M. Co. 

Woodville G. & S. M. Co- Wasl:oe. 

Yule Gravel M. Co. Placer Co.. Pal 

Yellow Jacket M. Co. 



1 00 June 4 

1 50 Jnne 3 

1 00 Jnne IG 

75 June 3 

50 April 14 

1 00 July 14 

2 00 July 11 
50 May 23 



Cal. 

"Wishoe. 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Idaho. 

"Washoe. 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Ely Diet. 

Cal. 

Cal. 

Idaho. 

Nevada. 

Washoe. 



"Washoe . 

Washoe 

Nevada. 

Nevada. 

Ely District. 

Ely District. 

Washoe. 

Ainerif nn Flat. 

{Nevada. 

Idaho. 



Other Companies 



Atlnntic & Pacific Con. M. Co. 
Beckwith M. Co. . Ely Distriot. 

Brown's Yallov Cons. M. Co. 
Buena Vista Vinicultural Society, Cal. 
Bunker Hill M. Co. Oal. 

Caroline M. Co. Ely District. 

Central X.and Co. Cal. 

California Beet Suffar Co. Cal. 

Cederbpre FirslN.Ext.G. & S.M.Co. Cal. 
Central Coal M. Co. Cal. 

■ Central PolynesiaLandCo.Navieators Ib 
Commercial Coal Itf. Co. Cal. 

Hutch Flat Blue Gravel M. Co. 
Taisv Hill G. M. Co. Grass Valley. 

East'ldaho M. Co. Oal. 

Eclipse & Lee ". M. Co. Cal. 

Emerald Hill M. Co. Utah. 

Enterprise Gravel M. Co. eras'- Valley, 
Eureka M. & Smelting Co. Eureka Nev. 
Eliza M. &M. Co. Siskiyou Co., Cal. 

Equi ( able Tunnel *i: M. Co. 
Freur Stone Co. Oal. 

Greenhorn G. M. Co. Cal. 

Granite Tunnel M. Co. Cal. 

Grace M. Co. ScheU Creek. 

Great Blue Gravel Range. Cal. 
Greenville M. Co. Plumas Co.. Cal. 

lSeckcrdorn G. «fe S. M. Co. Cal. 
Uasloe SI. «feM. Co. Mariposa Co. 
HermipueiaMining Co. Lower Cal. 

Lady Eaten Tunnel <fe M . Co. Utah. 
La Paz M. Co. Ely District. 

Ladv Emma M. Co. Oal. 

Mendha S. M. Co. Nevada. 

Manhattan Marble Co. Cal. 

Omega Table Mountain M. Co. Cal. 
Orients. M. Co. Nevada. 

Placer G. M. & Canal Co. Cal. 

Potrero Land Investment Co. 
Phenix Tunnel AM. Co. Utah. 

Pioneer Cons. M. Co. Nevada. 

Potrero Land Investment Co Cal. 

Plymouth Rock M. Co. Uiah. 

Prospect M. Co. Grass Valley. 

Begcut Cons. M. Co. Utah. 

Risng StarM. Co. Oal. 

Sanderson G. M. Co. Cal. 

Schuylkill Quartz M. Co. Cal. 

Stanislaus "Water Co. Oal. 

StanfidauM "Water Co. Cal. 

Starr King M. Co. Nevada. 

South Emma M. Co. Utah. 

Silver Sprout M. Co. Inyo Co.. Cal. 
Stickle QuarlzM. Co. Cal. 

St hell Creek Af. Co. Schcll Creek. 
Kprmg Mount M. Co. Ely District. 

State of Maine M. «fc M. Co. Cal. 
StevensPaciflc Smelting A V r 
San Jacinto Tin Co. Cal. 

The City Gardens, S. F. 

Victoria and Impe»ial T. & M. Co. Utah. 



IS 


3 00 


June 11 


1 


20 


May 28 


ti 


51 


May 28 




10 


July 3 


IS 


1 00 


JutelO 


II 


25 


July 2 


IS 


1 00 


June 9 


411 


2 00 


May 26 




S 00 




14 


Ml 


June 9 


e, 


1 00 


June 24 


« 


II) 


June 25 


« 


1 50 


June2 


4 


20 


June 23 




511 


Julyl 


u 


2 00 


June 11 


4 


25 


June 19 


« 


1 III! 


May 21 


4 


50 


May 31 


14 


25 


May21 


■•Ii 


5 Oil 


June 24 


'*> 


4 0G 


Jnne 4 


II 


25 


Way 28 


3 


211 


June 19 


it 


1 I'll 


May 6 


4 


£0 


May 10 




50 


June 20 


H 


.111 


June 24 


4 


25 


June 10 


K 


50 


Ma* 23 


H 


VII 


June 20 


a 


10 


June 19 


•i.H 


25 


May 28 


a 


75 


July 16 


a 


20 


June 4 


is 


5 00 


July 10 


S 


(not on 




' 6 


June 20 




15 


July 7 


1 


50 


June 27 




5 00 


June 12 


111 


10 00 


June 5 


1 


20 


June 20 




1 25 


June 9 




III III! 


May 26 


3 


20 


Way 27 


a> 


■/II Oil 






5 00 


May 14 




50 


July 9 


a 


50 


Stay 13 


^ 


50 


June 12 


h 


5 




1 


25 


Jnne 13 




25 


June 24 


•2\ 


4 00 


June 11 


1 


20 




* 


1 00 


May 1 


2 


III 


May 5 


ti 


2 00 


May 27 




1 50 


July 11 




III 


June 27 


1 


10 


June 20 


It 


10 


June 12 


4 


1 on 


June 11 




25 


June 9 


1 


Ml 


May 14 




3 on 


May 6 


'A 


5 


June 11 




Ml 


June Ifi 


H 


mi 


June 25 


1 


1 00 


June 9 




1 CO 


June 23 


'2 


5 


June 4 


'/, 


10 






in 


July 8 




70 00 


June 11 




III 


July 2 


1 


III 


June 19 




70 on 


June 11 


1 


5 


June 11 


4 


4 


June 6 


- 


— 


May 26 


h 


G 


July 11 


ft 


15 


June 20 


ID 


10 




2 


2 


July 2 


1 


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June 3 


;t 


511 


June 10 


1 


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June 11 


a 




June 3 




50 


June 11 




10 
50 


April 10 
May 14 


3 


5 


May 23 


1 


20 


June 4 


H 


10 


June 14 




6l)5!jjiine 27 




20 


July 1 



July 10 
Jhlyfl 
July 21 
July 6 
Way Iff 
Aup 19 
Aup21 
July I 
July IG 
July 2 
Julyl 
Aug II 
July 14 
Aur. 4 
July H 
Jane 30 
Aug 2 
July 12 
July 29 
July 29 
July 21 
July 24 
Aug 15 
Jnlyl9 
July 25 
June 27 
July 2 
June 27 
July 29 
JulyS 
July 3 
July 21 
June 19 
June 24 
July 20 
July 29 
July 17 
June 30 
July 29 
July 24 
Julyl 
Aug 19 
July 9 
Aug 15 



July 24 
Aug 11 
Aug 2 

Juiy 15 
July 7 

Aug 8 
July 10 
June 30 
June 28 
July 15 
June 17 
Aug. 16 
June 14 
July 15 
July 28 
July 19 
Aug 1 
July 10 
Ju'y9 
June 9 
July 17 
June 30 
Aug 18 

Aug 4 
July 26 
July 14 
July 16 
July 10 
June 28 
July 2 
July 17 
July 21 
July 26 
July 15 
July 2i 
JulyS 
July 19 
Aug 11 
July 14 
Aua. 6 
July 25 

July 14 
July 18 
July 7 
June 28 
Aug 13 
July 19 
July 10 
Aug. 10 
July 7 
July 14 
July 21 
July 15 
July 17 
June 27 
June 21 
July 2 
July 7 
July 28 
Aug7* 
Aug 5 ' 



July 30 
Aug. 4 
Aug 12 
July 31 
July 30 
Sept 8 
Sept 11 
July 21 
Aug. 7 
July 30 
July 25 
Aug 29 
Aug. 6 
Aug. 25 
Aug, 4 
July 21 
Aug 22 
July 31 
Aug 19 
Aug 18 
Aug 11 
AusB 
Sept 15 
Aug 4 
Aug. 19 
July 21 
July 31 
July 21 
Aug 18 
July 28 
July 23 
Aug. 8 
July 31 
July 22 
Aug. 12 
Aug IS 
Aug 12 
Jub 21 
Aug 18 
Aug. 18 
July 19 
SeDt 6 
July 29 
Sept 15 



Aug. 12 
! Sepi 2 
Aug 25 

Aug. 4 
July 28 

Sept 4 
Jufy28 
July 22 
July 18 
Aug. 5 

Aug 5 
Sept. S 
July 29 

Aug. 2 
Aug 16 
Aug. 11 
Aug 26 
July 31 
Aug. 1 
July 30 
Aug 8 
July 21 
Sept 10 
Aug 22 
Aug 20 
Aug. 5 

Aug. 4 
July 28 
July 21 
Aug. 18 

Aug. 3 
Ang. 16 
Aug 18 
Aug. 11 
Aug 11 
July 28 
Aug. 11 
Aug 30 

Aug 4 
Aug. 15 
Au« 1H 
Aug 4 
Aug 18 
July i'l 
July 22 
Aug 30 
Aug 4 
July 28 
Aug % 
July 28 
Aug. 4 
Aug 15 
Aug 12 
Aug. 30 
July 21 
Julyl? 
July 2\ 
Juty 24 
Aug 31 
Aug 25 
Aug 27 



L. Kaplan, 
Geo. R Spinney, 
Joseph Msgutre, 
D. P. Baglev, 
T. F. Cronise. 
J. Magitire, 
R Wegener, 

C. S. Heal. 

D. T. Bagley, 
R. Wegener, 
Geo. R.. Srenney, 
G. W. R King, 
Geo R. Spinney. 
Joseph Maguire. 



Merchants' Ex.. 
320 California st 
419Californiast 
401 Calilorniast, 
■133 California at 
419 California Bt 
414 California st 
419 California st 
401 California st. 
414 California St 
320 Calif orniast 
411 California st 
320('alii'orniast 
4lf) California st 



A. K Duibi ov.-,i oom22, Blerch's'.Ex 
L, Kaplain, Merchants' Exchange 
J. F. Lightner, 438 California st 

A. Noel, Room 20, 419 California st- 
K. Wegener, 414 California sfe 

H. C Kibbe, 419 California sfc 

J. P. Cavallier. 509 Montgnmeryst 
Geo. Fletcher, Grass Valley 

J. S.Luty, £07 Montgomery st, 

E. McFaddin, Express Pld'g: 
Geo R. Spinney. 320 California st 
Wm. WilliB. 416Califoinia8t 
H. O. Kibbe, 419 California Btt 
J. Vaguire. 419 California nt 
J. Marks, Merchsnt'sEx 
W. W. Stetson, 414 California Bt. 
Joseph Maguire, 419 California st 
S. Phillips. 408 California Bt 
O. E. Elliott. 419 California st 
T. W". Colburn. 414 California st 
w.E Dean. 419 California st 
Henry B' .vie, Stevensun's Bld'g 

F. E. Bunker, 36 Montgomery st. 
J. L. King, 411 California st. 
J. M. Bufllngton, 37 N. M. Exchange 
Geo. R. Spinney. 320 Californiast 
T J.Herrmann, 418 Kearny si. 
A Noel, 419 California 8t 

W. H. Watson, 302 Montgomerv Bt 

G. W. Hopkins, God Hill 



the Boards.) 



A. Noel. 
W. H. Watron, 

E. B. Noyes, 
H. Selmer, 
C H. Knox, 
C. E.Elliot. 
B F. Haewell. 
Louis Fnmcfini, 
J. N. Weu.-tev. 
W. Hilleelass, 
J.J. Moal'Urn, 
S. B. Hanson. 
W M Helman 
H. Silvester. 

P. H. Paynter, 
A. Trcadwell, 

F. Madge, 
M. McDonougb, 
T. P. Beach, 
T- F. Cronise. 
C. S. Healy. 
R. Wegener. 
Joel F. I ightner 



419 O.ili forma st 

302 Aiuiitgomeryst 

411!^ California st. 

409 Buttery st. 

19 First st. 

419 California bb 

338 Montgomery st. 

314 California st. 

50 B Montgomery st 

457 8th st. Oakland. 

319 California at. 

402 Montg'ry Bt 

401 Ca'iforiiie st 

GraSB Valley. 

Grass Val.'ey 

4111b California st 

Merchants' Ex 

Grass Valley. 

217 Sansomest. 

438 California st 

MerchantB' Ex 

414 Calilorniast 

438 California et 



W. G. Holme , Cor. Wash. <fc Battery 
W. H. Knight, 331 Mont, st 

Wm. H. Watson, 302 Montgomery sr. 
H. C. Kibbe, 419 California st. 

L. Terme, 734 Montgomery si. 

J W Tripp. 408 California bt 

J. H. Applegato. 729 Montgomery st 

C. S Healy. Merchants' Ex 
W. W. Hopkins. 411^ California st 

A. D. Carpenter, 605 Clay st 
Geo. R. Spinney, 320 Calilorniast. 

D. M. Bokee, 319 Pine st 
David v* jider, Merchants' Ex. 
Joseph Maguire, 419 California ?t 
Geo. W. R. King, 411 California st 

B. B. Minor, 41 lis California st 

C. S. Healy. Alerchants' Ex: 
C S.Meal, 419 California st 

B. B. Minor, 411J6 California st. 
Jap. Mason, 422 California st. 
J. Jackson, Grass Valley. 

W. L. Ualick, 438 California st 

J. M. Buthngtcn, 37 Merchants' Ex 
Wm. Stuart, 113Liedesdorff at 

W. E. Reed, Grass Valley. 

C. C. Tripp. .'2fi Kearny st 
C. O. Tripp, 526 Kearny st. 
L. Kaplan, Merchants r Ex. 
HemylSoyle, Stevenson's Bidg 
T B.Wingard, 318 California Bfc 

E. When ton, 401 Montgomeryst 
P W. Van Winkle. 304 California st 



T. W. Colburn. 

H. B. Congdon, 
J. M. Knight, 
L. Fran coni. 

G. S. Ladd, 

W. H.Watson, 



419 California st 

sue Montgomery st 

320 Montgomery st 

314 0.1 HI ormast 

522 Calilorniast 

302 Montgomery st 



MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 



Name of Co. Location. 

American Flat M. Co. Nevada, 

California Pacific R. R, Co. Cal. 

Ccderburg G. M Co. Cal. 

Cons. Gold Hill Quartz M. AM. Co. 
Dardanelles M. Co. 

Eclipse Winters & Plato Gold Hill M Co 
Frear Stone Co. 
Kentucky M. Co. 
Frear Stone Co. 
Latrobe Tunnel A M. Co. 
New York Cons. M. Co. 
Overman S. ML. Co. 
Pictou M. Co. 
Red Jacket M. Co. 
Savage M. Co. 
South Overman M. Co. 
Tyler M. Co. 

Tecumseh G. S. & C. M. Co. 
Union Cone. M. Co. 
Washington M. Co. 
Yellow Jacket S. M. Co. 



Nevada. 
S. F. 

Nevada. 



Washoe. 
Washoe, 



Secretary. 
L. Hermann, 
E. H. Miller, Jr. 

D, M. Bokee, 
R. Wegener, 
J. L. King, 
J. Marks, 

R. Wegener, 
J. P. Cavallier, 
R. Wegener, 
R. N. Van Brunt, 
H. 0. Kibbe, 
Called by Trustees 
S. Phillips, 
H C. Howard, 

E. B. Holmes, Cor. 
D. V\ ilder, 

A. K. Durbrow, 
F J. Hernm nn, 
J. M. Bufflngton, 
T. B. Wingard. 
G. W. Hopkins, 



Office in S.F. 

Virginia City. 

319 Pine st 

414 California st 

411 California et. 

Merchants' Ex 

*414 California et. 

509 California st 

414 California st 

Merchants' Ex 

419 California st 

414 Calitomiasi. 

408 California st. 

332Mcnlgo , i ery st 

Cal- & San some sis 

Merchants' Ex. 

Merchants' Ex. 

Cor. Clay &, Kearny 

* Merchant's Ex. 

318 California st 

Gold Hill 



Meeting'. 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Special 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Annual 
Animal 
.Annual 



Ann 



ul 



Annual 



LATEST DIVIDENDS— MINING INCORPORATIONS. 



California- 
Wash oe. 
Washoe. 
California. 
Cal. 



Name of Co. Location. 

Blaok Bear Quartz M. Co. 
Black Diamond Coal Co. 
Belcher M. Co. 
Crown Point G. & S. M, Co. 
Cederberg G. M. Co. 
Con. Amador M. Co. 
Diana M.'Co. 
Eureka M. Co. Grass Valley, Cal. 

Eastport Coos Bay Coal. Oregon. 

Eure'ka Consolidated M. Co. Nevada. 
K. K. ConBoMdated M. Co. 
La Grange Ditch & Mining Co. 
Meadow Valley M. Co. Ely District. 

Mahogany G. & S. M. Co. Idaho. 

Monitor-Belmont M. Co. Nevada. 

Providence G & S. M. Co. 
Raymond & Ely M. Co. Ely Dist-, Nev. 



Secretary. 
W. L. Oliver, 
' . B. Cornwall. 
H C. Kibbe, 
C.E.Elliot, 

D. M. Bokee. 
F. B. Latham. 
N. C. Fasset. 
R. Wegener, 
J. L. Pool. 

W. W. Traylor, 
B.B. Minor, 
R. Abbey, 
T. W. Colburn, 

E. McFadden. 
B. B. Minor. 

J. M. Buffington 
A. J Moulder 



Office in S. F. 

316 California st. 

Cor. Harrison & Spear. 

419 California st. 

419 California St. 

420 Montgomery St 

402 Monigomesy St 

220 Ulay St 

414 California st 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California st. 

41P-6 California St. 

312 Montgomery St. 

409 California St. 

402 Mont'gry, St. 

411^ California St. 

Merchants' Ex. 

419 California St. 



50c 
I 00 
1 00 
1 00 
5 00 
1 00 
25 



Date. 
|July 2& 
Aug 11 
July 31 
July 31 
July 19 
July 21 
August 1 
July 17 
Augl 
Aug 2 
July 29 
Aug 12 
Juiy 22 
Aug 5 
July 17 
July 26 
July 28 
July 17 
Julv21 
July ;-o 
July 2) 



Payable 

July 17 

Mar. 10 

July 1C 

July 12 

Feb. 6 

Apr. 1 

Jan . 20 

Julv9 

Apr. 11 

Jnly 21 

July 10 

June 12 

July 15 

Aug. 7 

Mar. 15 

Nov. U 

Feb. 1 



LATEST DIVIDENDS— MISCELLANEOUS INCORPORATIONS. 



Name of Co. vocation. 

B:ink of California, S. F. 

California Theater Co S. F. 

California Insurance Co. S. F. 
First National Gold Bank of S. F. 

Aerman Savings .t LoanSociety. S. F. 
Humboldt Savings & Loan Society, S. P. 
Merchants' Exchange Bank of S. V. 

Alu reliant* 1 hxchange Ass'n. S. P. 

Naiional Gold Bank & Trust Co S. F. 

North Beach & Mission R. R. Co. S. F. 

Pacific Oyste* Co. S. F. 

Spring Valley Water Woiks. S. F. 
San Francisco Pavings Union. 

Union Insurance Co. S. F. 



SecorCashie r. Office in S.F. 
W. C, Raiston.Ch'rtCor. Cal A Sans'm. 
Z. C'rowell, Sec. 318 California st. 

Bush d -HrKearnv st. 
N. K. Mastick, Ch'r, M it. & Bursts. 
Geo. Lette, 526 California st. 

A. Harlmann, 16 Geary at. 

R. N. VanBruiit. Ch'r.. 415 Cal. st. 
J. A. Coolidge, Sec. i\ ..TChain-' Ex. 

D. O. Thompson Ch'r., 4Vl Cal. st. 

Fourth Jt Louisa sts. 
J J. Winant, 27 S. F Market. 

E. M. Miles, Sec. 516 California st. 
L. White, irh'r., 532 California st. 
C. D. Haven, Sec. 416 A 418 California st. 



Amount. Payable. 


1 per cent. 


May 15 


3 per cent. 


April 15 
May 

April 7 


W per cent. 


2S )'ier cent. 

9 6 10 & 8 per cent. 


July 15 


9(i 10, 8 A 4 per cent. 


July 16 


1 per cent. 


May 10 


,'i. per cent. 


Mar. 15 


1 per cent. 


May 


% per cent. 


April 
Julyl 


10 00 


!;5 per cent. 


May 10 


9 6-10 4 8 percent. 


July 14 


3 per cent. 


lAprll 



July 19, 1873.] 



MINING AND SClENTiFJC PRESS. 



fa-7 



Our Weekly Stock Review. 

Thursday Eve, July 17, 1813. 

Our stock market bu been in a deplorable condition 
most of too put week, the feature, however, being the 
break In Savage. It vu reported that tbe 1,700-ft, 
level cross-cut* of that mine wan failures, and the Vir- 
ginia stocks broke wltb the news, creating aparfic, 
which carried other stocks down also. Savage has been 
going up since the first of April, but after the books 
closed, the election Was virtually decided and the de- 
feated parties threw their stock on the msrkct. 

Dividends this month were as follows: 

Per Share Amount 

Belcher * 8 f&W.OOO 

Crown Point 4 400,000 

Black Bear 60c 15,000 

Eureka 1 30,000 

Eureka Con 1 20,000 

Keystone Con 1 10,000 

K K, Con 2*c 12,600 

Meadow Valley 1 cu.i.nm 

On Friday the market evinced no extraordinary ac- 
tivity, and was weaker than on the previous day. On 
Saturday there was no more animation, and the fluc- 
tuations In prices were of no moment. 

On Monday it was still weak under the heavy break In 
Savage. Tuesday Savage again fell heavily, carrying 
-other stocks with It. The market rallied a little In the 
afternoon, and Baltimore Con. rose $2; Belcher,$3; Hale 
£ Norcrou, ti; Ophir $1; Raymond it Ely, $2; Belcher 
fell $1.50 lower and Crown Point, $2. 

On Wednesday a slight advance In prices was appar 
•■at, but the fluctuations were small. 

The Baymond & Ely paused its dividend again this 
month, much to the dlBgust of stockholders. The 
Crown Point surplus this mouth Is $609,096. The Ray- 
mond & Ely dispatch of the Hth says the total ship- 
ment up to 14th, for July, amounted to $93,008. The 
Idaho mine, of Orass Valley, paid a dividend of $77,500 
—$25 per share— produce of June run. The Belcher 
telegram of the 11th says: "South drift, 1,300-ft. level, 
still In Bplendid ore, and looks very favorable. South 
cross-cut, 305 feet south, 1,200-foot level is in twenty 
feet, and shows fine ore. Oar samples, $104." Thus 
It appears, the 1,200-foot level is also 305 feet In the 
Belcher and 390 feet In the Crown Point. The Ait-t 
aays: 

In the descent of 400 feet from the 9th level the ore 
has lengthened from 70 to 670 feet, and has widened 
from a few feet to 120 feet. The 1,400-feet level is now 
draining in the Crown Point, and three winzes are sink- 
ing on it in *100 ore. This level may prove Btill richer 
than the others where a portion of the ore has been 
taken out. The pyramidal shape of the ore seems to 
continue, and the Jacket mine, on the north, 1b feeling 
for it with good indications. The striking it there will 
at once determine its entire occupation of the Crown 
Point ground, as well as that cf the Keotuck and a por- 
tion of the Jacket. It may, on the south, cross the 
Belcher to the Seg. Belcher, and the present aspect of 
the works justifies such anticipations. The mines pos- 
sess the most perfect machinery; but the removal of 
such quantities of ore requires very careful proceeding 
in filling In. It Is sometimes not prudent to move ore 
until the substitute for it is quite ready to take its place, 
and there/ore the outturn is occasionally retarded. 

There are apprehensions of trouble between the 
Crown Point and Belcher Companies about some ground. 
An accurate survey ,showa that the Belcher Company 
has worked on the Crown Point ground 3J$ ft. at the 
1,000-ft. level; 6 feet at the 1100-ft.; 14 ft. at the 1200- 
f t. and 18 ft. at the 1300-ft. level. Several thoroughly- 
competent engineers will act for both companies on 
a certaining exactly the amount orground worked over, 
A suit for reclamation of ore may be instituted, unless 
amicable arrangements are made. The value of the 
ground Is thought to be worth upwards of half a mil- 
lion dollars. Work upon the ground has been stopped 
until the matter is decided. 

To-day Btocks were weak and irregular and a decline 
is apparent In several descriptions. 



SflNING 



iUMMARY. 



The following is mostly coodtiued from Journals pub 
laned Id tneintenor.io proximity to the mine* meutiooed; 



An Impboved Cooking Kange. — A cooking 
range was patented through the Scientific 
Pjbess Patent Agency recently, by James H. 
Mitchell of this'city, which shows some new 
and important points in constrnction. The 
front plate of the stove or range is removable, 
and the ovens are secured to it so that by tak- 
ing away the front plate, the ovens will also be 
removed, so that they can be repaired when 
necessary, without resorting to the present 
plan of tearing down the range to get at the 
ovens. The top of the range is made in sec- 
tions, and when one of the sections becomes 
cracked or broken, it can readily be removed at 
little expense, whereas as formerly constructed, 
in a single piece, the whole top has to be re- 
newed when it is cracked in any portion, Mr. 
Mitchell also claims an arrangement for pro- 
tecting the water pipe, which is usually carried 
around inside of the range to furnish hot water. 
The range also is provided with a permanent 
shelf arrangement conveniently situated to re- 
ceive and keep hot, dishes and viands which 
have been prepared. This range appears to be 
just the thing for hotels and restaurants, and 
we learn that the inventor has put up quite a 
number already, and has orders for many more. 
Messrs. Locke & Montague, of this city, have 
made arrangements with the inventor to man- 
ufacture and sell these ranges upon the Pacific 
Coast. 

' Steamboat Ceeek mines, Douglas County, 
Oregon, are again being worked. The owners 
are now busily engaged, making ditches and 
flumes, and have hopeful prospects. 

Daniel "Wellington, of Virginia City, Ne- 
vada, is requested to communicate immediately 
with this office, 



California. 

CALAVERA8 COUNTY. 

Railroad Flat II i strict .—Calaveras Chronicle, July 
12: The Superintendent of the Sandersou is anxiously 
awaiting the arrival of a new Cornish pump. Ore In 
bottom of sh :ft looks and prospects splendidly. A few 
hands are sloping above the lower uurth level, extracting 
ore worth f50 per ton. 

Some work Is being done on the Prussian Bill with 
a vliw to giving certain parties a fair opportunity to In- 
vestigate its merits. 

W. Sambo] fc Co. are reopening their old mini an Ub 
South Fork ridge, some two miles north of Railroad 
Flat. The mine paid well previously. 

West Point District.— All late developments in the 
Lone Star enhance the value of the property. 

The shaft ol the Atlantic Is 76ft, deep; running levels; 
or.' will probably average 18 Inches In tblcklK 
gold freely. 

Zscatero struck a 20 inch vein in south level; the ore 
shows gold pretty lively. 

The transverse drift of the Ohio has tapped the east 
vein, 4 ft.lhlckof fairmlllingore. Tbodrlftbasevident- 
ly cut the north end of an extensive and valuable chim- 
ney. As the south level of the west vein progresses 
with its usual width the ore gains in gold. 

Rich Strike.- -Calaveras Uitixen, July 12; During the 
week there has been one of the richest quartz discov- 
eries near San Andieas ever made in this county. Fran- 
cisco Qehoa, a young man who has been living at West 
Point, came here last week for the purpose of pros- 
pecting for quartz in the vicinity of San Andreas. 
After several days' work he found a small ledge about 
one mile from town, from which he has taken rock of 
astonishing richness, fie has done no work on it as 
yet; but it is calculated that some 10 or 15 pounds 
rock which he found on the top will yield $800. The 
ledge 1b about 1 ft. wide. The proprietors of this treas- 
ure are Francis Ochoa, Dr. Ovlatt and George It. Chick. 

Rich Gravel Claim. — Lloyd's claim is now paying 
better than ever, the last clean-up having exceeded 
their utmost expectations. The Co. now employ 12 
men, and the arastra is ke; t constantly running. The 
proprietors sunk cousiderable money In prospecting 
the claim, and are now receiving it back with interest. 
We hope their good luck will continue, and the pros- 
pects are very favorable for its doing so, 

INYO COUNTY- 

Inyo Indendent, July 12 : ' Panamint Mines, — We are 
permitted to extract from a private letter the following 
Items concerning the Panamint district, the mines of 
which are now creating Borne little excitement in the 
southern portion of our county. The district was dis- 
covered in January last, by R. C. Jacobs, W. L. Kenne- 
dy and R. B. Stewart, the enterprise being projected by 
Jacobs and Kennedy, when alterwards Stewart went 
with the party. The number of locations recorded 
amount to 80 or 90. The class of ore is copper silver 
glance, or grey copper ore heavily charged with silver 
bearing eulphurets and chloride. About June 1st gale- 
na lodes were discovered by Cburen and Wilson; some 
of them are large, 10, 12 and 15 ft. wide, and some run- 
ning on the Burface for a mile or more. The mines are 
situated immediately south of Telescope Peak, the Re- 
corder's office being in Surprise Valley, where the prin- 
cipal mines are situated. The rock assays all the way 
up to $3,000 per ton, but the probable average of metal 
bearing ore is $125 per ton. Nothing except the Sierra 
Nevada can beat the location for timber and water. Al- 
titude of mlneB about 8,000 ft. Country rock, lime. 

The Bilver ore is properly milling rock, but if lead ie 
found in abundance it will be smelted. Distance from 
LagunitaPost Office (Little Lake), 55 miles; from Los 
Angeles, 210 miles. The principal lodes found are the 
Wide West, the Gold Hill, No. 1 and 2, Wonder, Wyo- 
ming, Marvel, Pinos Altos, Surprise, Challenge, Beauty, 
Chief, Canon, Venus, K ing of Kayorat, Esperanza, Sil- 
ver Ridge, Garry Owen, Balloon, Panamint, Mina Verde, 
Blue Belle, Sunset, Pine Tree and many others. Sur- 
prise Canon runB about 50 incheB of water under four 
inch pressure, The mines are all in Inyo coxtnty, and 
distant 100 miles from Independence. 

NEVADA COUNTY- 
North Star Mine.— G. V. Union July 11: During the 
past month, the North Star mill reduced 366 tons of 
quartz taken from the mine. This yielded 2,495 ounces 
of amalgam, or 820 ounceB of gold. This gold is val- 
ued at $14,608. The expenses of the mine for the Bame 
time amount to about $26,500. It must be remembered, 
however, that the North Star is doing an immense am- 
ount of dead work, which will result, eventually, 
in causing the balance to go to the other side of the ac- 
count. 

Mining near Allison Ranch. — Grass Valley Union 
July 15: The Atlantic Co., consistieg of Mr, Colbert 
and others, are starting work on the Atlantic claims, 
situated south of Allison Ranch, in Tail's ranch. 

The Omaha, near the Ranch, has a ledge which is 
about two feet in thickness, and shows well in free 
gold. There are many ledges in the vicinity of Allison 
Ranch, the moBt of them located, which will pay for 
working. 
YUBA COUNTY- 

Smartsvuxe Mining Co. — GrasB Valley Union, July 
15: The Enterprise Co., operating at Smartsville, will 
soon have the great tunnel and flume completed, and be 
ready for washing rich gravel. The flume is a mile 
and a quarter long, the greater portion of it being (n 
the tunnel. It is 4 ft. wide and 30 inches deep. It will 
be paved with stone. The tunnel is 8 ft. high and 7 ft , 
wide at the bottom. The tunnel has cost something 
like $100,000. In its construction about $12,000 worth 
of Giant Powder was used. The work has been in pro- 
gress about 3 years. When the flume is completed it 
will require $10,000 worth of quicksilver with which to 
charge it. The Co. has a great body of gravel, which 
prospects well from surface to bedrock, 

Nevada. 

STAR DISTRICT 

De Soto Mine.- -Silver Stale, June 28: This mine, we 
are informed, is worked more extensively than any 
other in the district. It is located on the south side of 
the canon, in a siliceous limestone formation known 
as the "Shebabelt," and is traceable on the surface 
about 3 mileB, Two ledges, known as the east and 
west veins, running parallel with each other, and 100 
ft. apart, have been developed in the works. The east 
vein, at a depth of 300 ft., is from 11 to 14 ft. wideband 
in a EO-ft. stope, which is now being worked on the 
lower level, carries considerable Bhipping ore, worth at 
San Francisco $600 per ton. The west lode, which iB 
not being worked at present, is from 1% to 5 ft. wide, 
and not so rich as the larger vein. The Co. has let a 
contract to run the lower level on the east ledge 100 ft. 
further south. 

From Star Disthict. — Pioche Record, July 11: Mr. 
Wesley Williams, Star District, Utah, gives usthe follow- 
ing items about that locality: The principal ledge in the 
district is the Hickory. On this ledge a shaft has been 
sunk to the depth of 135 ft. So far as prospected, the 
lode shows a body of ore from 4 to 9 ft. wide, of good 
milling quality, and rich in Bilver. A ten-stamp mill is 
now on the way from Chicago, belonging to the com- 
pany who own the Hickory mine. The Hickory is situ- 
ated in what is known asNorthStar — Star district being 
subdivided into North, South and Middle Star, and 
West Camp. South Star was the first portion of the 
district discovered, and contains a great many ledges 



mon of Li . rJ llv very rich. 

In Xurth Star there are also a groai number of Locations 
■on* of them of a very premising chsxtctar, but the 
main mine of that section is undoubtedly the Hickory. 
lo Mii'lU-aud West camp the veins appear tobt 

I r defined than elsewhere, and it is not Impos- 
sible that . piiiMit- will pruw them to b»- 
the main mines of the camp. Lincoln District, 1m 
miles from Hlnartville, about which there wu 
erable excitement two years ago, is now untenanted by 
» solitary miner, th.ufh th.n- in do doubt that there 
are some very valuable mince in the district. Litiga- 
tion, that curse of mining camps, has had much to do 
with producing thiB state of affairs. Hinersville holds 
its own, and Is quite a thriving place. 
WASHOE. 

/rt*., July B: The shaft is now 
down 60 ft. and is in tolerably hard and dry rock. It is 
itiiu three compartments and is being very 
noatly and substantially timbered. The engine and 
hoisting Duchlnerj ll u)l on the ground and the pit for 
the engine foundation Is dug. It has been excavated in 
the solid nek and the foundation win therefore be firm, 
The new shaft is situated about 300 ft. east of the old 
one. which was Mink to the depth of over 300 ft. The 
ground from the old shaft down to the new One la lib r- 
ully covered with quartz and quartz boulders. The 
lead is of Immense size. The main lead crops out Just 
wcBt of the old shaft, while a large branch of it comes 
to the surface went of the new shaft. While the main 
ledge dips to the east, the large Bpnrwe here mentioned 
appears to stand tn a vertical position. The ore found 
In the ledgo prospects excoediugly well, and now that 
machinery is being erected and preparations made to 
properly work it, we hove no doubt an excellent mine 
will be developed. 

PHELPS' Consolidated.— This property embraces a 
lead lying to the eastward of and running parallel with 
the Eossuth lode, and south of and about in range with 
the Buckeye and Lewlston mines. The lead was first 
found and opened upon while the work of construct- 
ing one of the tailing reservoirs was in progress, but 
has since been opened in several other places. It as- 
says well in both silver and gold, and, if properly de- 
veloped, would prove a valuable claim, 

Buckeye Mine — We yesterday called at the Buckeye 
mine, while on a visit to the various mines now com- 
loginto notice about Silver City. Work is being steadily 
prosecuted, 30 men being employed at the works. 
They are taking out 25 tons of good milling ore per day, 
which is reduced at the Hope Mill. They are now down 
400 ft., and are taking out ore from 4 different levels. 
The principal yield of the ore is gold. During our stay 
at the mine, James Eellen, foreman, took a hornful of 
dirt from the car and washed it out. The dirt came 
from the 200-ft. level, and judging from the prospect 
obtained from that washed, would pay $17 or $18 per 
ton. The gold is very fine — almost as fine as flour. A 
good deal of water is coming in at the bottom of the 
mine, and the pump is kept constantly running. 

Lewiston Mine. — This mine, located and principally 
owned by Mr. McLaughlin, is situated Bouth of and on 
a line with the Buckeye and in Long Ravine. Two 
shafts have been sunk on it The upper one, or that 
nearest the Buckeye, is down a depth of 60 ft., all the 
way on the ledge, which ia very well defined, and is 
here four ft. in width. The ore yields well in both sil- 
ver and gold. We were shown assaya made of ore taken 
from the veln.whic h run all the way from $53.66 to over 
$300 per ton. There is no machinery on the mine, and 
so much water in the Bhaft that it is impossible to sink 
it deeper with a common windlass. The lower shaft is 
about 30 ft. In depth, and in sinking it the Bame diffi- 
culty with water was experienced. 

Crown Point.— Gold HillJVews, July 12 Ih: Owing to 
the breaking of one of the spur-wbeelB of the hoisting- 
engine, during the first of the week, the usual yield of 
ore has been greatly leeBened, comparatively few men 
being employed in extracting ore. The main south 
drift on the 1400-ft. level is Btill driven energetically 
ahead toward the Belcher lice, with no change of inter- 
est since our last report. The eaBt crosscut from 
this drift, to tap and drain the heavy body of water be- 
tween the 1300-ft. and 1400-ft. levels, is in 68 ft., four 
drill-holes being kept driven ahead to drain the water, 
which is easily handled by the pump. As fast as the 
preBBure of the water decreases, another drill-hole 1b 
started, so aB to keep the Bupply of water up to t he 
full capacity of the pump. As soon as the water 
began to disappear from the 1300 foot level, three 
different winzes were started on that level, one near the 
north line, another near the center and the other near 
the Belcher line. The north and middle winze are each 
down 8 or 10 ft., the entire distance in rich ore The 
machinery is again repaired, and the ore-yield will be 
increased during the coming week to 450 tons of ore per 
per day. 

Green Mine,— Some rich quartz encountered in clean, 
ing out the old incline Bhows a concentration of the 
fine strings of ore found above. ProgreBB in the incline 
is necessarily Blow, owing to the works having laid idle 
bo long, necessitating the removal of considerable debris, 
and some slight caving. In every instance, thus far, the 
favorable condition of the mine fully agrees with the 
accounts given by the former Superintendents, there- 
fore the company are fully confident of finding the rich 
body of ore at the incline, bo favorably described by the 
Superintendents aforesaid. That point is expected to 
be reached by the first of next month. 

Belcher. — Daily yield 450 tons per day, from the ore- 
producing levels, all of which are still looking finely. 
The Bouth drift in 288 ft. from the Crown Point line, 
with the face still in fine ore. The main incline is 
down 191 ft. below the 1200-ft. level, and the 1300-ft. 
level Btation will be opened as soon as the Surveyor 
gives the proper points to start from. The dividend of 
$8 per share, declared on the 5th inst , and disbursed 
day before yesterday, aggregated $832,000. 

Baltimore Consolidated. — The heavy body of water 
at the upper level in the ore-vein shows no sign of de- 
creasing, which may be considered a fair indication that 
the lower level drift has not yet reached that ore vein, 
as it would doubtless tap the water. The north drift is 
still following the ore vein, which shows continued im- 
provement as farther drifted upon. At the lower level 
the drift west is in clay and quartz, with increase of 
water. The indications are such as to justify the belief 
that the ore vein is close by. 

Consolidated Virginia.— Sinking the shaft is making 
steady, though not quite so good headway as at our last 
report, owing to the striking of a belt of porphyry of a 
much harder quality than that heretofore penetrated. 
The main north drift on the 1,167-ft. level from the 
Gould & Curry shaft has made no progress during the 
week on account of the heavy and continuous flow of 
water from the face, which is all that the new pumps of 
the Gould & Curry can handle. 

Julia.— The main east drift on the 800-ft level is still 
driven vigorously ahead, with no change to note. The 
south drift from the main west tunnel on the 1,000-ft. 
level tapped a heavy body of water on Thursday last, 
which has stopped all work in the face at present. The 
water rose in the shaft a distance of 20 ft., but not so as 
interfere with the work. The hoisting tanks are now 
able to drain 1 he supply with ease. 

Chollab-Potosi.— Daily yield 100 tons of ore, the as- 
say value of which is ?30 per ton. The ore breasts in 
the Belvidere, Blue Wing, and other portions of the old 
workings In the upper mine, are not looking quite bo 
favorable. The east cross-cut from the main northwest 
drift at the fourth station is in 60 ft., the face in quartz 
carrying some metal, but showing no rich development 
as yet. Annual meeting next Monday. 

New York Consolidated. — Shaft down 260 ft. and 
making good progreBB. The pump keeps the shaft en- 
tirely clear of water, allowing of the most perfect facil- 
ity in sinking. From two to two and a half feet per 
day iB the average downward progress made. Mr. 
Thomas Brooks, the Superintendent, iB conducting 
operations to the very best and moBt effective advantage. 

American Flat. — The drift from the Baltimore shaft, 
at the 450-f t. level, has reached within 40 feet of the 
American Flat line, and is in clay and quartz, with the 



water increasing. The winze is in popbyry and clay 
looking very favorable. 

Pinoc— The main tunu. 1 is still being ruergeticallv 
driven ahead, with favorable indications coming In a*t 
the face. 

Crown Point Extension.— The large new working 
shaft of this company is making most excellent pro- 
'■'■ award, and will soon require steam hoisting 
works, the foundations for which are already »>eing 
graded and prepared. It ie a three-compartment shaft 
intended to work the mine a great depth, and being 
located on the north side of the canon Just below the 
Jon« B residence, it will anticipate the regular eastward 
dip of the great lode, which it is expected to cut at the 
depth of 1000 feet. Thr location being covered by 
I nited StaU* patent, and immediately adjoining the 
Crown Point and Belcher, la one of considerable im- 
portance. 

LowxnCosnrrofK.-Th.* linking of the new working 
•malt of the mine is being most energetically conducted 
with excellent progress, the rock working well As 
soon as required adequate hoisting workK will be erect- 
ed to carry the shaft to a depth of 1.11011 feet or more 
The ledge, however, will be cut at a depth of 800 feet! 
Lying as it does on the branch of the great lode which 
passes down Gold Canon, between the Silver Hill and 
Dayton mines, the Lower Comstock Is a most valuable 
mine and will so prove to be one of these days. 

Overman.— Good progress is being made westward 
with the main drift, and branches at the 1,000-ft. level, 
The machinery and everything works well. The Over- 
man Company are deserving of the most triumphant 
ultimate success for the great perseverance and energy 
they have displayed thus far in developing that particu- 
lar section of the old Comstock. 

Mnrr.— The tirst cross-cut, seventy-five feet from the 
shaft in the main southeast drift at the first level, has 
penetrated the ledge, which, at that point. Is ten feet in 
width, showing some ore of on excellent quality. The 
second croBS-cut, on the same level, is through the vein 
which, at that point, is eight feet in width, and of a 
very promising character. 

Occidental.— The mill was started up on ore from 
the mine last Wednesday. A supply of 600 tonB of ore 
is already delivered at the mill ready for reduction. 
From 30 to 3G tons per day are being extracted, with 
thousands of tons in sight, which can be extracted as 
fast as the mill can crush it. The mine never showed 
better or looked more prosperous than at the present 
time. 

Or-HiB.— The main shaft from the 1,475-ft. level, after 
passing througblajhard belt of rock into a soft stratum is 
now in hard rock again. The north drift at the l,3uo-ft. 
level is also in hard, unfavorable rock. The south drift 
at that level is in excellent working ground and favora- 
ble indications. No change elsewhere. 

Savage.— The main south drift on the 1,700-ft. level is 
Btill driven energetically ahead to connect with the 
north drift on the same level, from the Hale k Norcross, 
with no new developments. Prospecting the other lev- 
els still continues, with no change of interest to chron- 
cle. 

Gould fc Curry.— Prospecting the 1,500 and l,6()0-ft. 
levels continues with unabating vigor, and no favorably 
developments to report. About 10 tons of ore per day 
are being extracted from the old upper workings. The 
new pumping machinery works to perfection. 

Caledonia.— Daily yield 50 tons of ore from the 400 
ft. level, keeping the Sapphire mill Bteadily running. 
Both the north and south drifts on the ledge, from the 
main weBt tunnel on the 500-ft. level, are showing more 
favorable indications of ore developments than hereto- 
fore. 

Hale & Norcrosb.— The north winze on the 1,700-ft. 
level is down 120 ft. in good sinking ground, and no 
material change of interest to report. Nothing new to 
report of the other levels of the mine. Sinking the in- 
cline for a new level will be resumed in a few days. 

Silver Hill.— The first station continues to yield 60 
tons of ore per day, keeping the Bacon mill running 
steadily. The main north drift at the second Btation is 
still driven ahead parallel with the ledge and no change 
of interest to report. 

Franklin, --The main west drift has been cleaned out 
and repaired to the ledge, and is now in very favorable 
looking vein matter. It is expected to reach the ore 
body, known to exist, in a very Bhort time, when some 
good developments may be looked for. 

Jacob Little.— The ore in the lower tunnel continues 
to show finely as further developed. Some very rich 
assays are obtained from it. From the second cross- 
cut, drifting in the ledge Bhows good ore, assaying well 
in both gold and silver, 

Daney,— The hoisting works are completed and in 
full operation, and the sinking of the new Bhaft is be- 
ing prosecuted with great energy. From what is known 
of the ledge at this point, some good paying ore is sure 
to be developed by this shaft. 

Yellow Jacket.— Drifting as usual, both north and 
south, at the 1,400 and 1,500-foot levels, with no new 
developments to report. An assessment of $5 per share 
iB levied. 

Sterua Nevada,— Daily yield, 50 tonB of ore, keeping 
the mill steadily running. The ore breasts continue to 
look and yield well the further the vein is followed back 
into the mountain. 

Utah.— The water was drained, and sinking the Bhaft 
resumed on Monday last. The sinking is making excel- 
lent progress, the rock in the bottom blasting finely, 
and the machinery working to perfection. 

Arizona and Utah.— Sinking the shaft is progressing 
at the rate of 2 feet per day. The winze in the main 
east drift on the 250-foot level ie down 70 feet, the face 
still in ore of an excell nt quality. 

Woodville.— The north ore sections show still further 
improvement this week. Superintendent Curtis has got 
the mine in excellent working shape, and is developing 
it for all it is worth . 

Knickerbocker.— The southwest cross-cut from the 
main west tunnel on the 400-foot level is in 36 feet, the 
face in quartz, and showing some very favorable and 
encouraging indications. 

Globe.— No further work can be done to advantage, 
by reason of the great heat and bad air, till an engine 
and blower are put in operation. 

Buckeye.— Daily yield, 20 tons. The ore-producing 
sections look well, showing little or no change for bet- 
ter or worse. 

Colorado. 

Items.— Herald, July 2. The liveliest mining district 
of Gilpin county at present, is between Mountain City 
and the Bob Tail hill. Thi Briggs Brothers are raising 
large quantities of rich ore from the Gregory and Briggs 
mine. Rogers is mining on the Bobtail through the 
1,150 ft. tunnel, recently completed. The Fiske is mined 
by George Mabee through this Bame tunnel. Bela 
Buel is still mining extensively on the Leavitt at Moun- 
tain City, and is putting in a sixty-stamp mill. "Work 
has again been resumed on the Bates and Hunter and 
on the Gregory Second lodes. 

Above Central, George Barrett is working the 'Winne- 
bago and CaBtro mines, under lease from the Co. The 
ore pays well. 

The lower portion of the Prize lode is being worked 
by Gilbert. On Quartz hill less mining is being done 
than at any previous period for several years. Roberts 
& Co., who pumped the water from the shafts of the 
Ophir Co.'s property on the Burroughs, one of which is 
600 ft. deep, are now working about 40 men, and are 
raising large quantities of rich ore. J. B. Tomlinson iB 
working number six on the Kent County with profit. 
Kimber, Fullerton & Mackey are werking the Pocahon- 
tas near the Illinois. Sparks & Fagan are extensively 
working the Waterman on the Kansas lode. The quality 
of ore now raised is not very rich, but prospects are 
fair for a better condition. The ShanBtrom Brothers 
are raising considerable ore of fair quality from the 
American Flag. On the hill north of Nevada Topping, 
Hense & Co. are working the Hubert successfully. 
(Continued on Pag-e 44.) 



38 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, I873- 



The Great Valleys of California. 

How Shall they be Irrigated? 

No country on the globe possesses more 
fruitful or extensive valleys, available for cul- 
tivation only by irrigation, than the State of 
California. The experience of the three or 
four years past, has shown that a general, 
liberal and comprehensive system of irriga- 
tion is essential to a proper development of 
these extensive tracts of land — that by such a 
system, they may soon be fitted to contain, 
and furnish remunerative employment for, a 
population of two or three millions of people. 
Without such improvements they -will continue 
for ever the same arid wastes which they now 
present. 

The measure of their growth and develop- 
ment will depend upon the plan and policy, 
which may be adopted for their irrigation. If 
a broad and liberal policy is adopted, fostered, 
guarded and protected by the State, they will 
soon teem with millions of happy, thriving peo- 
ple, sufficient in numbers and intelligence to 
furnish bread, sugar and textiles for almost the 



able. There is probably no question that will 
come before the next Legislature, or before 
Congress, in which this State will have so 
great an interest as the settlement of this mat- 
ter of irrigation. And who doubts that a Leg- 
islature, the majority of which shall be made 
up as our two or three last ones have been, 
will hesitate to Bell itself to the moneyed in- 
fluence that will present itself for special 
privileges ? 

California is at this time a prolific field for 
speculators. It seems as if men had gone mud 
over the idea of acquiring large and speedy 
wealth, and any measure, however corrupt, 
which bids fair to aid, in such acquirement 
seems to find ready supporters. 

We have a grand scheme of irrigation for the 
San Joaquin valley already under way, without 
any definite plan or purpose of action. They 
are looking to Congress and our Legislature for 
aid and encouragment, and they should receive 
it under proper restrictions and regulations. 
There are other similar enterprises on foot for 
the Sacramento and other valleys throughout 
the interior. No doubt there are many, and, 
perhaps a majority of well meaning, honest 
men engaged in these various schemes for im- 



work is about half a million of dollars. It is 
believed that nearly all the water of Butte 
Creek will thus be diverted from its natural 
channel, and that as a consequence, the stream 
in the valley will be dry in the summer. The 
farmers along its course are uneasy at the pros- 
pect, and fear that they will be seriously in- 
jured. Indeed, we learn that steps will be tak- 
en to test the right of the Company to divert 
the waters of the creek : the farmers claim that 
they have rights in the premises which must be 
respected. The probability is that the matter 
will be in litigation for some time to come, and 
that there will at least be a feast of fat things 
growing out of it for lawyers. 



The Chinese Temple. 



It seems hardly worth while for the Chinese to erect a 
temple for worship in this city, because almost every 
Chinamen puts up a little god on his own hook in his pri- 
vate apartments. Nevertheless there are such things as 
" Joss Houses " in San Francisco, and a representation of 
the'interior of one is herewith given, from a drawing by 
Eastman. It is situated in the Chinese quarter of the city, 
and presents nothing peculiar in its exterior appearance, 
with the exception of the tinsel ornaments and Chinese 
infcriptions at the door. Irt this temple there are four 



main cabinet an oil-fed lantern is k«pt burning, not by 
" vestal virgins," but by a very unpreposessing Chinese 
priest. Should the flame eipire, they think as did the 
"College of Virgins," that it betokens dire calamity. In 
the cabinet on the left is Wok Taw, the " God of Medi- 
cine," who appropriately holds in one hand a large golden 
pill; arguing method again, needing no explanation to be 
appreciated'. Before his altar is a table covered with sand, 
in front of which a priest sometimes stands, after repeating 
h?s incantations, till he reaches a clairvoyant state, and then 
he_writ.es with a stick, under dictation of the Spirit, what 
is intelligible to no one else, but what he never fails to 
read and interpret. 

The priest or attendant has the care of eleven tin or bam- 
boo canisters, about a foot high and three inches in diame- 
ter. These contain bamboo slips, each numbered to cor- 
respond with slips of paper containing the answer of the 
god. After the worshipper bows once or twice, he kneels 
and shakes the slips till one falls to the floor. This is placed 
on the censer of incense, where the god can see it, and his- 
approval is sought. If not approved, the process must be 
repeated until a favorable answer is received. This ap- 
proval is gained by means of the divining-sticks, the general 
method of consulting the gods. If the deity is not sup- 
posed to know the circumstances of the case, he may know 
them by the burning of paper, upon which is written the) 
necessary information. On the floor, in front of the images, 
are vessels to receive the libations. Cooked food is placed 
before them while the act of worship is going on, but is 
then carried home and eaten by the judicious worshippers ; 
cups of tea can always be seen before some of the images. 
The worshipper prostrates himself, either bowing or kneel- 
ing three times, and then lets the divining-sticks fall to the 
floor. These are pieces of wood six or eight inches long 
and shaped like the half of a split bean II the flat surface 




CHINESE JOSS HOUSE, SAN EEANCISCO, CAL, 



entire Unionjand their annual products may be 
counted by hundreds of millions of dollars in 
value, to which the yield of the mines of the 
entire Pacific Coast will be but a mere baga- 
telle. 

On the other hand, if the waters which exist 
in ample sufficiency for all purposes of irriga- 
tion, are placed under the control of a few un- 
scrupulous capitalists, they will be doled out 
at the hightest price which the land owners 
can possible pay and live, by which policy a 
shabby, ill-directed system of cultivation will 
be introduced, which will largely diminish the 
numbers that will people these valleys, and 
greatly reduce their moral, social and physical 
status. 

"Which of these two policies shall we adopt ? 
Which will most benefit the great masses of the 
State at large ? These questions will probably 
receive a practical and final answer next Win- 
ter, at Washington and at Sacramento, and 
every person in the State is more or less di- 
rectly interested in securing an issue which 
Bhall benefit the masses rather than a few 
speculators. 

The people can bring about such a result 
only by a determined unity of effort to send 
to the next Legislature and to Congress men 
of enlarged and liberal views — men who will 
have the interest of the people at heart, and 
men who have shown themselves incorruptr 



provement; but in view of the general spirit of 
speculation, and the corrup legislation which 
everywhere abounds at this time, none can doubt 
that so prolific and promising a scheme as is 
here presented will fail to be improyed by 
scheming and designing men, who'are already, 
or may hereafter, become interested in these 
projects. There can be no question as to such 
an event, unless the people elect men who will 
refuse to become parties to such conspiracies 
against the good of the State. 

Divebsion of Btjtte Ceeek to Concow Vat- 
ley. — The Butte Record of yesterday says: The 
Cherokee and Spring Valley Consolidated Min- 
ing Company, on the 5th, commenced to divert 
the water from Butte Creek, taking it to Con- 
cow Valley through the discharging arm of the 
Dogtown pipe. The work just completed was 
one of great magnitude. The water is piped 
across Little Butte below Dogtown, thence 
along the ridge and over the west branch ol 
Feather river into Concow Valley, thence by a 
ditch leading along the ridge to a point oppo- 
site Cherokee Flat; and thence it is taken in 
another pipe and conveyed back across the 
west branch to Cherokee Flat with a pressure 
of 900 feet. There were used in the work 6,500 
feet of 30-inch pipe, and there are eight miles 
of canal eight feet in width. The capital em- 
ployed in the construction of the stupendous 



rooms containing idols; the drawing, however, shows only 
the main room, which has four alcoves and six gods. In 
the central alcove there are three gods, and hideous looking 
objects they are, not at all calculated to inspire either con- 
fidence or fear in the observer. 

The middle one of these three is Tun Ten Tin, the "God 
of the Sombre Heavens," who controls water, and is wor- 
shipped to prevent the fires so much dreaded by Chinese 
in their crowded, wooden buildings. Their deity is a veg- 
etarian, and only vegetables are used as offerings. On the 
left hand is Kovan Tai, the " God of War," corresponding 
to the Mars of the ancients, and possessed of an appropri- 
ately red face. This personage is worshipped by the Chi- 
nese in this country more than any of their gods, and in 
temples where there is only one image, it is invariably his. 
He is also regarded as a god of wealth, and is besought for 
general benefits, receiving almost universal worship. From 
this it will be seen that there is " method in their madness," 
and their action will strike a sympathetic chord in many 
hearts which worship the same idea in another form. The 
head on a twenty dollar piece is perhaps handsomer to look 
upon than that upon a Chinese god, but tastes differ. This 
god is found more frequently than any other in Chinese 
shops, stores, and dwellings. He is a great arbiter of dis- 
putes and quarrels, and to invoke or threaten his aid is as 
effective in settling accounts as to begin a law suit. On the 
right hand of Kovan Tai is Nam Hoi Hung Shivg Tai, the 
" God of the Southern Seas," or local god of Canton, who 
controls fire. He receives his worship, and offerings of 
wine, tea, meats and vegetables, from those whose effects 
he has preserved from the flames. 

The alcoves, or cabinets, in which the gods are enthroned, 
are made of wood, profusely, but not elegantly, carved, and 
lavishly gilded. The general darkness of the room is re- 
moved by the rich gilding and the gaudy robes of the gods, 
and an abundance of tinsel, peacock feathers, etc., on the 
top and at the base of the alcove; and on the fantastically 
embroidered vestments of the idols may be traced the sinu- 
osities of the dragon, which is itself idolized. Before this 



of one rests on the ground and that of the other is upper 
most, the answer is affirmative and the inquiry ceases. But 
if both flat surfaces are on the ground the answer is unpro- 
pitious, and is repeated to see the result of twice out of 
three times. With unfavorable continuation, it may be ne- 
cessary to continue to three times three, or even longer. 
Should both flat surfaces be upward, the answer is indiffer- 
ent. When the oracle is consulted by the bamboo slips, and 
the lot is approved in this way, the priest always makes a 
charge for the slip of paper, thus adding tohis support ; and 
this final answer is often as indifferent, equivocal or ambigu- 
ous as were those of Dodona or Delphi. 

Between the two alcoves already spoken of is a tall stand 
containing red flags, each having a letter or character upon 
it. These are the symbols of authority for messengers. 
Corresponding to this, on the opposite side of the main cabi- 
net, but hidden from view by the large metallic vases and 
candlesticks on the tables in the middle of the room, is a 
box with the seals of office. The vases contain artificial 
flowers and the candles are of Chinese vegetable tallow, 
sometimes highly colored. The god in the cabinet on the 
right is Tsoi Pak Shing Kvrwn, the " God of Wealth." 
He holds in his left hand a bar of bullion, emblematic of his 
power, which is singularly appropriate on this coast. 
(Query — If in the Eastern States, would he hold a green- 
back?) He is the special patron of merchants and all 
receivers of money, and is worshipped by those desiring aid 
in their enterprises. In front of all the altars or cabinets, 
are incense-jars filled with ashes, in which are placed up- 
right pieces of lighted incense, sticks of punk or other ma- 
terial. The worshipper often holds a small bunch of ihese 
lighted sticks while he bows or prostrates himself before the 
god. The bell shown to the left of the engraving is used 
in arousing the god when he is asleep. It was cast in 
China. 

There are a number of other images in this temple, dis- 
tinguished by no particular feature but unpronouncable 
names. Christians are always permitted to visit the temple 
to whom the attendants are uniformly courteous and polite. 



July 19. 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



Use^Ul IftfORp^T 10 "* 



Insect Life — Something to Think 
About. 

It is often aaiJ by persons when speaking 
of animals, insects, etc., that they are poor 
brainless things; yet do they not often display 
greater sagacity or what is called witchcraft, 
than man wonld show by his reason under like 
circumstances? 

"Long ago, it was ascertained by naturalists 
that worms and insects are without a brain, 
and yet they pursue a course of activity which 
bears much upon the domain of reason; so we 
are accustomed to say that they act from in- 
stinct, which is no explanation at all of the 
phenomena in the higher orders of organic 
life which have their origin in the brain. If 
that organ is severely injured, so that its nor- 
mal functions are no longer performed, con- 
sciousness and orderly manifestations of its 
influence are interrupted or suspended. But 
the insect world swarms with beings of the 
most delicate construction, without hearts and 
without bruins, whose movements and habits, 
independently of thousands of contingencies 
to which they are exposed, prove in the most 
satisfactory manner that their acts are a near 
approach to the elements of a reasoning facul- 
ty, if they do not indicate reason itself. When, 
by accident, a thread of a spider's web is 
broken, the little weaver examines the misfor- 
tune with extreme care, and by taking different 
positions, surveys the damage, and then pro- 
ceeds artistically to repair it by splicing or in- 
serting an entire new cord. Again, when a 
wandering fly becomes entangled in the net, 
the cautious approach of the owner of the trap, 
lying patiently near by for game, indicates cal- 
culation in regard to the character and strength 
of the victim. Does it not strangely resemble 
reason when all its movements, under such an 
aspect of affairs, show beyond a donbt the spi- 
der considers the matter in all its relations be- 
fore venturing to seize the prey? And yet spi 
ders are without a brain." 



Philadelphia, and while stopping in the parlor 
of the hotel there to rest, a gentleman who 
was with them— the father of one of the girls 
— called for sherry cobblers for the party, which 
were served, each tumbler being provided with 
a glass tube by which to draw the liquid into 
the mouth. When the tumblers were nearly 
empty the air, entering with water into the 
tubes, produced a gurgling sound, when the 
deal and dumb girl became greatly excited, 
laughed vociferously, and springing to her 
feet, and calling by gesture the attention of 
her companions, pointed first to her tumbler 
and then into her ears, and then laughed again, 
and as soon as she was sufficiently composed, 
told the other girls in the manual language of 
the deaf and dumb that she distinctly heard, 
when finishing her sherry cobbler, the noise of 
the water passing through the glass tube from 
the tumbler to her mouth — the first sound that 
Bhe had ever heard in her life." 



CULTIVATION OF FlSH IN DXTCUKS AND PONDS. 

— Experience proves that fish are much more 
easily cultivated than has been supposed. 
Much attention is now being paid 
in Germany to their cultivation in 
ponds and ditches, and it has been found, con- 
trary to the generally received opinion iu re- 
ference to auch localities, that they are more 
favorable for the purpose than other large 
bodies of water, apparently fresh and pure in 
their character. This is doubtless owing to the 
great abundance of animal life, as well as to 
the more decided concentration of vegetable 
substances in the form of living plants of dif- 
ferent kinds, including the alga). This pro- 
duces a constant evolution of oxygen, needed 
for the respiration of the fish, and allows a 
larger mass of life to be crowded together in a 
given space. The reproduction of the species 
is also unusually rapid, and the young grow 
very quickly. 



QOOD H e \ l TH- 



Eyes. 

There is a wonderful diversity among ani- 
mals in respect to the number of their eyes. 
In mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes, they 
are limited to two, and are always placed on 
the head. The greater part of the surface of 
the heod of the house-fly is covered by an ag- 
gregation of about 10,000 eyes; and in the 
dragon-fly they number about 50,000, and may 
be easily seen by the use of a magnifying lens 
even of very small power. 

They are not always confined to the head 
alone. In spiders and scorpions there are gen- 
erally eight or ten of them in one or more clus- 
ters, on the dorsal aspect of that part of the 
body which is formed by the union of the head 
and thorax. 

, The'star-fish qr five-fingers, familiar to every 
one who has spent any time on our sea-coast, 
has an eye on the tip of each ray or arm. In 
the sea-urchin, which is homologically nothing 
but a star fish with the ends of its rays drawn 
close together, the five eyes are gathered in a 
circle around what is considered the hinder 
portion of the body. 

The scallop has numerous eyes on the edge 
of his mantle, extending from one end of the 
animal to the other, and forming a semi-circle. 
Some marine worms have them in clusters, 
not only on the head, but also along each side 
of the body, even to the tip of the tail, and 
they are connected individually and directly 
with the medium nervous cord. If we descend 
to the lowest forms, we find many infusoria 
which have neither eyes nor nerves, and yet it 
is easy to see that they are sensitive to light, 
for they either seek or avoid it. — Hours at 
Home. 

Hearing by the Teeth. — A correspondent 
of the New York Observer, after reading an ar- 
ticle on the "Conveyance of Sound," stating, 
as a fact not generally known, that sound may 
be transmitted by the teeth, when the ears are 
closed, almost as distinctly as by the ears when 
they were open, and wishing to test its accuracy, 
experimented and wrote to that journal as fol- 
lows: — "I took the end of a long wooden pole 
(22 feet long) between my teeth, and requested 
another person to scratch with a pen-knife at 
the opposite end, when I distinctly heard the 
sound of the scratching, though when my teeth 
were removed from contact with the poleitwas 
quite inaudible. 

This, in connection with the following inci- 
dent, a few years ago, suggested to me the in- 
quiry whether contact with the teeth, or inter- 
ior of the mouth, as a medium for the com- 
munication of sound, might not be resorted to 
in some cases with advantage in the education 
of the deaf and dumb. The incident I alluded 
to is this : 

In 1860 I became acquainted with a very 
sweet deaf and dumb girl, about fifteen years 
old, who was a great favorite with my daughter, 
(of nearly the same age), as indeed she was 
with all who knew ber. One daymy daughter, 
her dumb friend and several other young girls, 
accompanied by the parents of some of the 
latter, visited Fairmount "Water Works, in 



Sensations Produced by the Inhalation 
of Nitrous Oxide Gas. 

Many of our readers may possibly feel some 
interest in learning what are the sensations ex- 
perienced during the inhalation of nitrous ox- 
ide gas, which has come to be extensively used 
as an anesthetic. Doubtless, the sensations ex- 
perienced by any individual will be quite dif- 
ferent from those which will be felt by others 
in the same circumstances, so that the record 
of one experience would be but little guide. 
Yet the following description, from the British 
Journal of Dental Science, is bo well written, 
that it may serve to gratify reasonable curios- 
ity of the fortunate people who have never yet 
been obliged to resort to any of the modern 
means of alleviating suffering attendant upon 
severe surgical operations: 

I had to undergo a painful operation. I 
wished to take the nitrous oxide gas. I had 
administered it a great number of times, and, 
in healing the incoherent way in which pa- 
tients expressed themselves as to the sensations 
whilst passsing into an anaesthetic state, I 
hoped I might be able to define, somewhat, the 
effects of the gas. I say I hoped to be able, 
for, of course, it is impossible to say what may 
be the effect of such an action upon any indi- 
vidual, until we have experienced it, as I have 
no doubt different persons are differently af- 
fected, and the gas is so interesting and im- 
portant to us that everything concerning it is 
worthy of notice. I was well attended. Two 
Fellows of the Royal College of Surgeons and 
the anaesthetist were standing behind me so that 
I could only see the face of the anaesthetist, as 
he leaned over my shoulder with the mouth- 
piece; the other two were quite hidden from 
me. I am quite sure of that; I was perfectly 
composed, and as soon as the pipe was put to 
my face I formed a resolution steadily to take 
in the gas. My eyes were open and I looked 
at the distant wall. I heard them say "He 
takes in the gas freely, " which were the last 
words I heard distinctly; then I felt my eyes 
droop and close. Now I seemed to be in a dif- 
ferent atmosphere, just as we feel in passing 
into a tropical house at Kew Gardens — differ- 
ent, but not an unpleasant atmosphere. As to 
choking, we hear so much about, or suffocation, 
I felt not even the least repugnance. The only 
effect was, I remember, thinking to myself this 
is another atmosphere; it seemed sweet and 
sooty; at the same time, my ears were filled 
with a burring sound, such as I suppose is felt 
in descending in the diving-bell, but not so vio- 
lent. Immediately there danced before me a 
violent light the size of a large candle, and with 
a strange, unearthly motion, and a confused, 
burring sound, it rose higher and higher, and 
I seemed to be strangely upborne with it. Up, 
up we went to a very high altitude; at last the 
light stood still , the burring ceased, and my atten- 
tion was simply fixed on the light. It seemed 
an immense height we had come. To this stage 
I seemed to be a nonentity; all my care had 
been devoted to the sound in my ears and the 
movement of the light; all the unpleasantness 
of atmosphere had passed away. 

Now, however, a change came over me; I be- 
came a person — a some one — I felt as though I 
could see from every part of me — a sort of cat- 
aleptic state; and, just as in looking over a 
cliff at Beechy Head, on a calm day, you hear 
conversation on the sea below, though you 



cannot discern the men in the skiff, so now, 
in a Btrangc, muttering nndertono, I heard 
a voice as though explaining something 
about me toothers. I was sure there were others 
present, and though explaining something, I 
did not know a single word of what was said, 
and, gradually, there crept over me the convic- 
tion that I was bound helplessly, and that they 
were doing something to me. There was a dead 
calm, the mutter ceased; I could see them look- 
ing intently, with heads inclined. Simulta- 
neously they raised their heads, and the voice 
again spoke, but I had no pain, nor had I any 
puin or feeling when the gash was made; in- 
deed (though I was cut in two places, ) not even 
the slightest prick; still, I knew when the 
tumor was punctured. Although it was aw- 
fully tender to the slightest touch in my nor- 
mal state, I had not the slightest pain until the 
tumor was violently pressed, to forco all the 
blood out; then I was conscious of painful 
sensation, and I groaned, as I thought, on ac- 
count of tho severity of the pain from squeez- 
ing. I felt whatever they were doing to me 
was now done, and done successfully, and I 
wanted to express my thankfulness, but I 
found myself unable to move or speak. Now 
the burring commenced, and the light which 
had hung all the time shiniug over my head, 
began to descend, and I with it, and, gradually, 
the talking became nearer and more audible, 
the light went out, and the burring sound died 
away in the distance, and my eyes opened, and 
with a heart full of gratitude I stretched out 
my hand to the gentlemen and cried out lus- 
tily, " Thank God ! thank God !" To which 
they replied, "It is all right; it is nicely 
done." I rejoined, " I know it is; I know all 
about it." 

I asked if I bad made any groaning when 
the pressure was applied, and I was surprised 
to hear that I was not only silent, but also mo- 
tionless all the time. I took four gallons of 
gas, and from putting on the face-piece to my 
regaining consciousness, was seventy seconds. 

I was not conscious of any sensation of nau- 
sea or giddiness, but a decided consciousness 
of disturbance, sensation of pricking about the 
region of the heart, and a great pain about the 
main artery in the upper portion of the leg, 
like a severe rheumatic pain, which increased, 
and though in bed, it settled into a dead cold- 
ness and want of circulation, which were not 
removed till I took two stiff glasses of stimu- 
lants; since that I have had no inconvenience. 



Expanding the Chest. 

Take a strong rope, and fasten it to a beam 
overhead; to the lower end of the rope attach 
a stick three feet long, convenient to grasp 
with the hands. The rope should be fastened 
to the center of the stick, which should hang 
six or eight inches above the head. Let a per- 
son grasp this stick with the hands two or three 
feet apart, and swing very moderately at first 
— perhaps only bear the weight if very weak — 
and gradually increase, as the muscles gain 
strength from the exercise, until it may be used 
from three to five times daily. The connection 
of the arms with the body, with the exception 
of the clavicle with the breast bone, being a 
muscular attachment to the ribs, the effect of 
this exercise is to elevate the ribs and enlarge 
the chest; and as Nature allows no vacuum, 
the lungs expand to fill the cavity, increasing 
the volume of air, the natural purifier of blood, 
and preventing the congestion or the deposit 
of tuberculous matter. We have prescribed 
the above for all cases of hemorrhage of the 
lungs, and threatened consumption, for thirty- 
five years; and have been able to increase the 
measure of the chest from two to four inches 
within a few months, and with good results. 
But especially as a preventive we would recom- 
mend this exercise. Let those who love to live 
cultivate a well-formed, capacious chest. The 
student, the merchant, the sedentary, the 
young of both sexes — aye, all — should have a 
swing on which to stretch themselves daily. 
We are certain that if this were to be practiced 
by the rising generation in a dress allowing a 
free and full development of the body, many 
would be saved from consumption. Independ- 
ently of its beneficial results, the exercise is an 
exceedingly pleasant one, and as the apparatus 
costs- very little, there need be no difficulty 
about any one enjoying it who wishes to. — JDio 
Lewis. 



Nasal Catabbh. — A medical writer says: "I 
will give a remedy for nasal catarrh which I 
think of some value. Many cases of catarrh 
are caused by inability of the liver to perform 
its functions properly. In such cases there is 
often a too alkaline condition of the blood. 
When this is the case, the liver does not take 
out as much of the carbon and other substances 
as it should, and the mucus membrane of the 
nose becomes a dumping ground for the foul 
matter. If persons thus affected will squeeze 
the juice of a good sized lemon into half a tum- 
bler of water, and drink it without sugar just 
before dinner, they will, if they live hygienical- 
ly, be surprised to see how soon the catarrhal 
difficulty will diminish. When it fails to do so, 
it may be considered as due to other causes." 

A Ribbon Round the Throat. — The same writer 
says : — Dr. Ellis gave me a simple receipt for 
throat and lung affections with which 1 pro- 
pose to close this article. Upon my remarking 
on my tendenoy to such affection, he said 
"Now Doctor, you may go home and thank 
God for having seen me, for I will give you a 
simple remedy that will be the means of pro- 
longing your life many years. Get a silk rib- 
bon an inch or more wide, tie it about your 
neck and wear until worn out and then replace 



it, and continue to do so. " I confess I was 
a little surprised to find a man of Dr. Ellis's 
intelligence relying with so much confidence 
on such a remedy, and I asked an explanation 
of its virtues, but this he was not prepared to 
give. If any reader tries this or the foregoing 
remedy, I should be pleased to know the re- 
sult." 



Domestic Eco^o^y. 



Grapes and Their Use. 

The following, from the Pomvlogisl and Gar- 
dener, is not entirely out of place even in this 
chosen home of the grape, and especially at 
this commencement of the grape season: — 

A correspondent of the Pomoloyist and Oar- 
dener says: — I have often been surprised that 
so few people know of any other use for grapes 
than to eat them from hand or to make them 
into wine. Why, they are good to cook! Yes, 
strange as it may appear, they are most excel- 
lent stewed for Bauce, make a very rich tart or 
pie, the nicest of jellies, no fruit better canned. 
Can be dried with less trouble thau most any 
other fruit. But the seeds, the great rough 
seeds, what do you do with them? We rough 
country folks care nothing for the seeds, we 
eat 'em. But if you do not wish to eat them, 
all you will have to do is to procure a brass 
wire sieve (they are on sale made expreBBly for 
the purpose) with the meshes between the 
wires just coarse enough so that the seeds will 
not pass through, squeeze the pulp and seeds 
from the skins, throw the skins into one ves- 
sel, and then rub the pulp through the sieve 
into another; but when well cooked, if stirred 
a little, the seeds will mostly settle to the bot- 
tom, and be out of the way. To dry them, cut 
the canes with the fruit and all the leaves on 
them, and hang them in the sunshine. They 
will dry in a few days, and can then be packed 
away for winter use, when they will be found 
better, when properly cooked, than most any 
other dried fruit. 

And the best thing about the whole grape 
business is that the coaser, easiest grown and 
most unpalatable of our grapes are the best 
for cooking purposes. And I have no doubt 
but that there 1b now, and will be produced, a 
line of grapes too pulpy and austere to be 
eaten raw at all, but will be very fine for cook- 
ing, like some pears. I have now a large, 
beautiful and productive white grape that will 
keep fresh and sound through the winter, and 
though entirely unfit to eat, I have no doubt 
but that it will prove splendid when Btewed. 

Secrets of Tea-Making. 

Chemists tell us that theine is the peculiar 
principle which constitutes the virtue of tea. 
Without this element it would be valueless as 
a beverage. It may interest tea-drinkers who 
think tea is all right because it comes from 
China. In California we have some security 
for the purity of home wines. Grape-juice is 
cheaper than any material which can be got to 
adulterate wine ; but around the tea-shipping 
ports of China, millions of pounds A all sorts 
of leaves are yearly gathered and made into 
spurious tea, as one- third the cost of the genu- 
ine. These are mixed in varying proportions 
with genuine tea. They are known to the trade 
as "cheap Canton teas." They are rendered 
deleterious not so much by the substituted leaf 
as by the unwholesome chemistry used to diB- 
guise the imposition. But last year a new 
article made its appearance in quantity in the 
London Tea Exchange. It came from Shang- 
hae, and it was found to be made of willow 
leaves so perfectly resembling tea as to be de- 
tected only by experts. Half a million pounds 
of this sham tea were made at Shanghae, in 
1870. The leaves are gathered in Spring-time 
and treated exactly as tea leaves in the man- 
ufacture. It is all mixed with green teas, in 
varying proportions of 20 to 40 per cent., ac- 
cording to conscience. The former figure satis- 
fies the Chinese factor, while the conscience of 
the Christian trader is said to have much greater 
elasticity. It should be known to tea-drinkers 
that, instead of theine, the active principle of 
willow leaves is salacene, which has properties 
nearly the same as quinine. This is much 
more sleep-banishing than theine, and its 
habitual use will gonerate fatal congestions of 
the internal organs. Till we raise our own tea, 
the almost universal adulterations should tend 
to made us sparing in the use of low-priced 
teas. 

Why Some abe Poob.— Cream is allowed to 
mould and spoil. Silver spoons are used to 
scrape kettles. The scrubbing-brush is left in 
the water. White-handled knives are thrown 
into hot water. Brooms are never hung up and 
are soon spoiled. Dish-cloths are hung where 
mice can destroy. Tubs are left in the sun to 
dry and fall apart. Clothes are left on the line 
to whip to pieces in the wind. The pie-crust is 
allowed to sour, instead of making a few tarts 
for tea. Dried fruit is not taken care of in 
season and becomes wormy. Vegetables are 
thrown away that would do warm for breakfast. 
The cork is left out of the sugar jar, and the 
flies take possession. Bits of meat are thrown 
out that would make hashed meat or hash. 
Coffee, tea, pepper and spices are left to stand 
open and lose their strength. Pork spoils for 
the want of salt, and beef because the brine 
wants scalding. 



40 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, 1873. 




ifiMfTIMcfclll 

WW 

W. B. EWER .- Sekiob Editob 

DEWJBY «fc OO., PiVblisliers. 

K, T. DEWEY, GEO. H. 6TEONG 

VT. B. BWEB, JNO. L. BOONE 

Office, No. 338 Montgomery St., S. E. Cor- 
ner of California St., diagonally across from 
Wells, Fargo & Co.'s. 

Subsobiptions payable In advance — For one year, $4; 
six months, $2.50; three months, $1.25. Olnbs of ten 
names or more, $3 each per annum. $5, In advance, 
will pay for 1 H year. Remittances by registered letters 
or P. O. orders at our risk. 
Advertising Rates.— I week. lmonth. 3 months, lyear. 

Perline 25 .80 $2.00 $5.00 

One-half inch $1.00 $3.00 7.60 24.00 

One inch 2.00 6.00 14.00 40.00 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or 
reading notices, legal advertisements , notices appearing 
in extraordinary type or in particular parts of the paper, 
insertedd at special rates. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 19, 1873. 



Legal Tender Rates.— 3. F., Thurs., July 17.- 
buying86^; Belling 86%. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



GENERAL EDITORIALS— Utsch's Automatic 
Jig; A New Type-Setting Machine; Water Supply; 
An Invention Wanted, 33. The Great Valleys of 
California, 38. American Locomotives on British 
Railways; Diamonds in Hydraulic Washings; The 
Emma Scandal, 40. Commencement Exercises of 
University of California; Parshall's Continuous Lu- 
bricator; A Pomological Curiosity; Report of Chollar 
Potosi Mining Company, 41. 

ILLUSTRATION'S.— Utsch's Automatic Jig, 33. 
Chinese Joss House, 38. Parshall's Lubricator; A 
Bunch of California Pears, 41. 

CORRESPONDENCE.— NoteB of Travel in Eureka 
County, Nevada; The Vienna Exposition, 34. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. — Position of the 
Planets for July; Proper Combinations in Soaps; 
Government Aid to Science; Hardening of Dried 
Peas in Boiling; An Interesting Chemical Expert- 
ment; AgaSBiz on Development; Mating Hydro- 
fluoric Acid; Effect of Sunlight on Flour; Effects of 
Sulphur Water on Iron Pipes; Exhalation of Car- 
bonic Acid Gas; Reducing the intensity of a Nega- 
tive, 35. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— Steam as a Fire- 
ExtinguiBher; New Mechanical Movements; Incrus- 
tation of Locomotive Boilers; Machine for Testing 
the Value of Lubricants; Hot-gilding of Iron; New 
Plan for Removing Sand Bars; The St. Gotthard Tun- 
nel, 35. 

MINING SUMMARY from various counties in 
California, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, Mon- 
tana ann Utah, 37-44. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Table of Daily 
Sales and Prices and Comparative Prices for the 
Week; Notices of Assessments; Meetings and Divi- 
dends; Review of Stock Market for the Week, 36. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— Insect Life— Some- 
thing to Think About; Eyes; Hearing by the Teeth; 
Cultivation of Fish in Ditches and Ponds, 39. 

GOOD HEALTH. -Sensations Produced by the 
Inhalations of Nitrous Oxide Gas; Expanding the 
Chest; Nasal Catarrh, 39. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.— GrapeB and Their Use; 
Secrets of Tea-Making; Why Some are Poor, 39, 

MISCELLANEOUS. — Clean Up; City Creek 
Mines; The Sierra Madra Tunnel; Immensely Rich 
Gravel, 34. Diversion of Butte Creek to Concow 
Valley, 38. Patents and Inventions, 41. One Half 
Year's Work; The Emma Mine; Contemplated Water 
Project; Hydraulic Mioing; White Pine Tailings; 
Sir Samuel Baker's Discoveries; Another Quicksil- 
ver Discovery; Interesting to Tobacco Users, 43. 



Mining Appointments.— "We see that our 
friend Mr. Henry Sewell has been named man- 
ager of the Camp Floyd Company's property. 
The company is now being wound up for re- 
construction and Mr. Sewell has requested 
them to raise $60,000 for a working capital. 
This appointment is quite a feather in Mr. Se- 
well's cap as he is appointed by the same Di- 
rectors who have been pitching into him so 
long for telling them the truth about the Utah 
Silver Lead Co., of Bingham. The same Di- 
rectors had both companies. They probably 
found out it was not just the thing to persecute 
him as they did. Mr. Sewell was about leav- 
ing for London when he received his appoint- 
ment, but he has remained to pull this compa- 
ny through. 

We see also that our friend Mr. Kiotte part- 
ner of Mr. Stetefeldt, and part inventor of the 
furnace of that name has been over the mines 
pretty frequently of late. 

He was sent to Pioche to correct some diffi- 
culties in handling the ores there. He was 
then sent for to come to Eureka, but was only 
there a few days, when, as a correspondent tells 
us, he was asked to go to the rescue of the 
Eye Patch mill where some one else had been 
summoned, who was unable to mill the ores 
to the satisfaction of the company. We hear 
now that Mr. Kiotte is in Utah, and is super- 
intending a large mill in that territory. 

" Pigeon Spbings" anew mining camp in 
the Lida Valley county, has a ledge of galena 
22 feet wide, the ore averaging $400 per ton in 
silver, and from 40 to 60 per cent lead. 

Rich silver and copper ore have been 
found in the Humboldt Bange, Nev. , about 11 
miles sonth of Unionville. 

The Mint has coined already this month 
over $1,300,000. 



Amerioan Locomotives on British 
Railways. 

" It is beyond question, be the cause what it 
may that the locomotive enginesof the United 
States cost less money and do more work than 
English locomotives; yet no English locomo- 
tive superintendent has ever proposed to build 
an engine from Yankee patterns and try it on 
an English line. The thing would be contrary 
to all precedent, and therefore is not done. 

The above paragraph only recently appeared 
in the London Engineer, and hence, though not 
very old, is nevertheless already substantially 
contradicted by facts, at least so far that an 
order has been issued, as follows, for a Domin- 
ion road, the head of whose management is in 
London. Verity the world moves. 

At the late semi-annual meeting of the Direc- 
tors of the Canadian Grand Trunk Railway, 
held in the city of London, where the' Engineer 
is published, the Chairman announced that the 
company had contracted for 300 new American 
engines, to take the place of most of the En- 
glish locomotives which were then running on 
that road, and added that the reason for such 
iction was, " because there has been enormous 
progress in the type and manufacture of engines, 
especially on the American continent. They 
make them there now much cheaper than we can 
buy tkem here, and there have been many mechan- 
ical improvements in the mode of constructing 
engines ; and I do not hesitate to say that 300 new 
engines of the present most advanced modern 
type, made by the best manufacturers in Amer- 
ica, and coal burning are worth 450 of our old 
engines, wood burning. Therefore, you see 
you get this in the substitution of one engine 
for another; you get a large excess of locomo- 
tive power." 

Truly this is'a most important tribute to 
American mechanical progress, and to the su- 
perior model and workmanship displayed by 
American locomotive builders. That the com- 
pliment was not intended for any single man- 
ufactory which might have succeeded in pro- 
ducing a superior machine, or one which hap- 
pened to please the English eye, is learned 
from the further statement of the Chairman 
aforesaid that the contract had been made with 
several of the best locomotive builders in the 
United States. 

And This is Not All, 
A year ago 600 American cars were purchased 
for the same road, and a further recommenda- 
tion has been made that the road be relaid with 
American steel rails and furnished with Pull- 
man cars and other American conveniences, 
which are not found on English roads or in 
English shops. 

And here we may also say, that American 
locomotive and American cars, are now being 
generally introduced upon the Brazilian and 
Peruvian railroads in South America, and we 
may very properly accept these facts, as the ac- 
knowledgement on the part of intelligent Eng- 
lish managers, that the trial of American and 
English railroad theory and practice has fairly 
resulted in our favor. If such a trial has thus 
resulted in so costly an experiment as railroad 
management, may we not rest assured, that the 
same result will follow in other, and less im- 
portant directions. 

Referring to the extract from the Engineer 
prefixed to this article it must be reasonably 
inferred, that prejudice rather than reason is 
the great hindrance in the way of English ac- 
knowledgement of the superiority of American 
ideas in at least one important branch of manu- 
facture; else why, if our locomotives " cost less 
money and do more xoork," will "no English 
locomotive superintendent " " build an engine 
from Yankee patterns, and try it on an English 
line?" The answer follows in the same para- 
graph — "The thing would be contrary to all 
precedent, and therefore is not done." 

Now, however, that the ground has been 
fairly broken in this Canadian railroad case, in 
the introduction of some 1,000 tons of Ameri- 
can iron into England, the introduction there of 
iron axles and some other products, to say 
nothing about numerous importent inventions 
— the Dank's furnace for instance — may we not 
hope that facts, brought to their very doors, 
will eventually wear away prejudice, and es- 
tablish "precedents?" It may be added, that 
all of these occurrences transpire at a time 
when they are calculated to do ns the greatest 
good. ^^_^^_ 

Assessors' Returns. — The assessors' returns 
for the different counties are being published 
by the local papers. We see Calaveras County 
mining claims are valued at $121,965, and the 
improvements on same, $131,795. Mining 
ditches are valued at $76,915, and the total 
valuation is, of all property, $6,223,839. 



Diamonds in Hydraulic Washings. 

Diamonds have again been found in the 
ground of the Spring Valley and Cherokee 
Mining Company, in Butte County, California. 
The Oroville Record saw three of them which 
were taken out at the last clean up', a few 
weeks since. One of them is a large straw 
colored diamond; another is a small but re- 
markably pure; and the third resembles the 
African diamond, with which Arnold and 
Slack salted the ant hills of the plains. The 
editor of the Becord did not learn their weight 
or value. The occurrence of these diamonds 
is not rare in the hydraulic washings of this 
State. Professor Silliman, in a paper read be- 
fore the California Academy of Sciences, in 
1867, spoke of having seen them from five dif- 
ferent localities. 

The same gentleman not long since made an 
examination of the sands collected in the 
sluices of this same claim; and the microscope 
revealed the fact that they abounded in beau- 
tiful colorless zoreons (hyacinths) of the form 
Well known in the hyacinths of Expailly, 
Prance, associated with crystals of topaz, 
quartz in fragments, rounded grains of chro- 
mic and titanic iron, and a few small, almost 
globular, masses of very high refracting 
power, which appeared to be diamonds. To 
determine this chemically, a portion of the 
sands were treated so as to be freed from any- 
thing which could afford carbonic acid but the 
diamond, and further experiments proved that 
diamond powder was present in small quan- 
tity. The method employed was giyeu in our 
issue of April 19th, 1873. Professor Silliman 
stated that when he was provided with a larger 
amount of the sands, he proposed to deter- 
mine the amount of diamond dust quantita- 
tively. In the examination made by him, it 
was found that the black grains, which consti- 
tute fully one-half the bulk of the Butte Coun- 
ty sands, are about equally chromic iron, 
which the magnet removes, and titanic iron, 
which is unaffected by the magnet. No me- 
tallic grains of any of the platinum or iridos- 
mium metals or gold could be found. 

It is thought that by a more careful exami- 
nation, by experienced eyes, of the accumula- 
ted sands of hydraulic washings, many rare 
species of minerals may be found, which have 
as yet escaped notice for want of scientific 
skill. Dr. John Torrey found no less than 
twenty distinct mineral species, many of them 
of rare occurrence, in a sample of sands from 
Nicaragua Placer mines. 



The Keystone Mine Patent. 

The Commissioner of the General Land Of- 
fice has issued patents for the claims of the 
Keystone Mining Company, on the Keystone, 
Spring Hill and Geneva mines, in Amador 
county. These patents were issued under the 
late decision of the Secretary of the Interior. 
The original claim to the Keystone mine, which 
was raised by sharp speculators, involved the 
question of wide application, as to whether 
the grant to the State of California of the six- 
teenth and thirty-sixth sections for school pur- 
poses, under the Act of March 3rd, 1853, in- 
cluded said sections, when they were on min- 
eral lands. The Secretary's decision, which 
was referred to at length in our issue of May 
3d, was as follows: 

First. — That title to said sections sixteen 
and thirty-six, does not vest in the State until 
a survey has been made, which brings into 
existence and locates said sections, and that 
said mining companies having appropriated 
said lands under the Act of July 20th, 1866, 
prior to such survey, they had the better right. 

Second. — That the seventh section of the 
Act of 1S53, excepts from the grant nil of sec- 
tions sixteen and thirty-six on which there had 
been prior to the survey a settlement, by the 
erection of a dwelling house, or the cultivation 
of any portion of the land, and that the settle- 
ment referred to was technically known as the 
' ' pre-emption settlement. ' ' 

Third. — That the grant was not intended to 
include, and does not include, said sections 
when they are on mineral lands. 

The points in the decision were very im- 
portant ones, as they established a principle 
which protects honest miners from the schemes 
of wily speculators, who want to profit by the 
work done by the miners in good faith, by a 
mere legal technicality. Strenuous efforts were 
made to gain a decision contrary to what was 
rendered, but fortunately with no success. 
The Keystone Company now have good title 
to their ground, and the decision in their favor 
protects others in similar circumstanoes. 



The Emma Scandal, or Mrs. Grundy. 

Written for the Pkess. 

Well, well, Mrs. Grundy, the old woman 
who employs herself about other people's busi- 
ness, even if she has no facts to back her 
statements with, has been busy about that old 
" Belle," the celebrated Emma, and is trying 
to make it a " cause celebre." Bufit so hap- 
pens that a person with expressive eyes and 
aquiline nose, who resembles an eagle as much 
as anything I have seen, is after the old lady 
and has stuck his claws pretty deeply into her. 

The scandal, this time, is about a flashy girl 
called Emma. Mrs. Grundy, it appears, got 
some of her old friends, Park & Co., of Mari- 
posa, etc., etc., to puff up this fashionable 
"Belle." But finding no market for her in 
their own country, they took her to London, 
and succeeded, with the aid of diplomatic rela- 
tions, to marry her to the honorable Mr. John 
Bull. It was not long before the honorable 
husband suspected her of possessing false 
teeth, etc., etc., which brought on serious dif- 
ferences with his newjy acquired matrimonial 
prize, whom he also found had deceived him 
as to her wealth. 

He determined at last to employ the eagle- 
eyed aquiline-nosed doctor, to investigate this 
unsatisfactory state of things. The doctor 
soon found that Mrs. Emma had many more 
false things about her than was suspected by 
her doting John, and reported accordingly. 
Those who palmed her off were on the lookout, 
and remonstrated in a most formidable manner 
through the press, and stated, with all the 
elegance, but minus the logic, they possessed, 
that the doctor was simply "bearing" Mrs. 
Emma down, trying to bring about a divorce 
case, so that the lady should, with all her mil- 
lions, fall into the hands of his own immedi- 
ate friends, who, they said, had promised to 
do the right thing by him. 

The doctor, who is a wide awake sort fellow, 
determined to upset the Emma-Mariposa-ap- 
ple-cart and gave the honorable husband to 
understand that if he had the slightest doubt 
as to the state of things he would call in two 
other physicians, (one of whom had spent a 
summer in Mariposa, and, therefore, fully 
competent to decide on this case). The verdict 
of the other two physicians differed in no 
manner from that of the eagle-eyed doctor, 
which is as follows: That her reputation for 
beauty and intrinsic value was far beyond her 
merits, but that, notwithstanding the great 
deception practiced on Mr. Bull, with proper 
treatment she could be brought round to raise 
a big and thriving family, if time and patience 
were allowed. 

Now, sir, this the plain statement of the 
case. Yours, truly, Punch. 

P. S.— My address is Mr. Punch, Fleet St., 
London. Shall be happy to place myself in 
future communication with your eminent firm. 

Some Vandal thief, went into the Geological 
museum of our friend Henry G. Hanks, at No. 
649 Clay street, one day this week and robbed 
the cases of a quantity of the richest gold and 
silver specimens, together with three valuable 
medals, which had been presented to Mr. 
Hanks by the Mechanics' Institute, the State 
Fair, and an English Institution. They took 
some large specimens of tin ore at the same 
time, but finding them of no value left them 
on the door step the same evening. The mu- 
seum has usually been left open for the benefit 
of \isitors, but Mr. Hanks will, after this oc- 
currence, probably have to be more careful, and 
keep the place locked or have some one in at- 
tendance. 

Times are lively at Eureka, Nev., as the 
mines are giving evidence of permanency, and 
the furnaces are well supplied. There are few 
idle men, and everybody is satisfied with 
the present and future prospects. 

Calavebas County Citizens have formed a 
club or association similiar to the Tuolumne 
County association, for the purpose of pro- 
moting friendly social relations among resi- 
dents and ex-residents of the county. 

The last olean up of the Idaho Mine 
(Grass Valley) after a four days' run, was $15,- 
000. The amount for the month is $77,500, or 
$25 per share. 

A Ditch 97 miles long is supplying a mining 
camp, 40 miles in extent in Baker County, 
Oregon; considerable gold is being taken out 
this season. 

The Watee-Level tunnel on the Butte mine, 
now being run, will cut the Butte ledge of the 
Bye Patch Company 600 feet from the sur- 
face. 



The sum of $20,000 has already been Bpent 
in the development of a coal mine, near Mark 
West Springs, Sonoma I'ounty. 

The Baldwin Expedition, to explore the 
mineral resources of Southern Utah, has start- 
ed from Salt Lake City. 

The Humboldt Ledge, near Dun Glen is 
again being worked. The ore will be worked 
by the Krom Concentrator, in Star District. 



July 19, I873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



41 



Commencement Exercises of the Uni- 
versity of California. 

The closing exercises of the I'nivt r*ity, at 
Oakland, were witnessed with much pleasure 
by large numbers of our citizens and strangers. 
The graduating class numbers twelve, of whom 
but five are academical students, thu remain- 
ing seven having taken the partial course. 
Want of space forbids onr entering as much 
into detail as we wonld wiBh. We can give but 
a brief review of the event* that mark the ter- 
mination of the University year of 1873. 

On Monday evening, July 1 1th, the annual 
reunion of the Iota Chapter of the Zeta P*i 
Fraternity took place. On Tuesday, selections 
from the graduating theses of the class were 
read. Judging from the subjects treated, the 
students are especially devoted to 

Practical Science 
And topics of local moment. We append the 
titles of the theses, with the names of the 
orators: 

"The Vigilance Committee;" by Nathan Now- 
murk, of San Francisco. 

"Placer Mining in California;" by Frank 
Otis, of San Francisco. 

"The Metric System;" by L. L. Hawkins, of 
Oakland. 

"The Reclamation of Marsh and Swamp 
Lands;" by John M. Boulton, of San 
Francisco. 

"Forestry;" by Thos. P. Woodward, 
of San Francisco. 

"The Commercial Policy of the United 
States;" by Jacob Reinstein, of San 
Francisco. 

"Boiler Explosions ;" by Ebenezer 
Scott, of San Francisco. 

"The Novel;" by Clarence J. Wet- 
more, of Oakland. 

"Cherry Culture in California;" by 
Frunklin Rhoda, of Fruit Vale. 

"Irrigation;" by James H. Budd, of 
Stockton. 

"Practical Applications of the Para- 
bola;" by George C. Edwards, of Visalia. 

"Possible Improvements in Railroad 
Construction;" by George J. Ainsworth, 
of Portland, Oregon. 

That such should be the bent of in- 
clination and the professed taste of the 
young graduates, is matter of gratulation 
to all who wish to see our State rapidly 
advanced; and this end will only be ob- 
tained by the inculcation and adoption 
of just such lines of thought as were 
evinced by the topics touched on. 

As compared with the ordinary tone 
of Commencement speeches we have 
had the misfortune to listen to elsewhere, 
this positive practicality was the distin- 
guishing mark. The credit of having 
instilled such ideas into the educational 
course pursued at Oakland is, in great 
part, due to the energetic President, 
Prof. Gilman. 

After the reading of the theses, the 
candidates for degrees of A. B. and Ph. 
B. were presented, and honorary appoint- 
ments announced. At the close of these 
performances, the members of the Associated 
Alumni of the Pacific Coast held their business 
meeting. In the evening, the usual Alumni ban- 
quet (!) was attended by the graduates of the 
different Colleges and friends of education gener- 
ally; the scene, of course, being graced by the 
presence of the ladies. It was noticed that the 
Yale element largely predominated. The open- 
ing address of Col. Barnes was a most spicy 
piece of composition, and the Col. was equally 
fortunate in remarks made during the evening. 
Other speeches, by Gov. Booth, Pres. Gilman, 
Hon. S. J. Field and others, followed, in re- 
sponse to the various toasts of the occasion. 
TheBe were quite interesting; but, it must be 
confessed, were somewhat stiff, and hardly 
took the plaoe of the genial camaraderie which 
marks such reunions elsewhere. 

The Commencement proper was on Wednes- 
day, the 16th, and consisted of the Latin salu- 
tatory, by Frank Otis; the valedictory, by N. 
Newmark ; the President's address to the 
class; the 

Conferring of Degrees 

Upon Nathan Newmark, Frank Otis, Jacob 
Reinstein, Ebenezer Scotfc and Clarence J. 
Wetmore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Upon George Jennings Ainsworth, John M. 
Bolton, James H. Budd, George C. Edwards, 
Leander L. Hawkins, Franklin Rhoda, Eben- 



ezer Scott and Thomas P. Woodward, the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Then followed a congratulatory address to 
the President, by Gov. Booth; and the presen- 
tation of a portrait of Bishop Berkeley, whose 
prophetic words, "Westward the course of Em- 
pire takes its way," have been so much quoted 
and so remarkably fulfilled. 

The alumni of the University met in the eve- 
ning, after which a very pleasant reception was 
given by Pres. Gilman. 

Altogether this Commencement may be said 
to have been a success. It certainly furnished 
a highly enjoyable and most interesting series 
of events. 



Parshall's 



Continuous Feeding Lubri- 
cator. 



We give herewith an illustration of C. H. 
ParshaU's continuous-feeding lubricator for 
steam engines, a recently patented invention, 
which is claimed to be unusually economical, 
lubricates continually and needs no watching. 
These lubricators are suited to all steam en- 
gines, delivering the lubricant, whether tallow 
or oil, to every kind, equally well. In the ac- 
companying cut, A is the screw cap or stopper, 
Ji, cup for lubricant, C, hot air chamber, D, 
glass tube in chamber showing the amount of 
water and of oil, i.', glass face to chamber, F, 




PARSHALL'S LUBRICATOR. 

screw caps to glass tube, H, valve stem, I, 
valve head, J J, steam duct through stem G 
K K, oil tube screwed at bottom into stem G, 
L L, steam tube within K K, and screwed also 
into stem O t M, common faucet, d, packing 
around ends of glass tube, /^passages admitting 
oil into glass tube, I, elongated hole in tube L 
L, at connection with stem G, V lateral hole 
near top of tube L X. 

In operation the steam rises through the 
duct J J, the valve /, standing open, and 
through the tube L X, and the lateral hole at 
l" near the top of same, into the top of the cup 
B. The oil, as the steam condenses, rises over 
the top of the tube K K, flowing down the 
tube and through the elongated hole I, in the 
bottom of the«fcube X i, into the duct J, and 
thence on through the valve i, and the other 
part of the duct to the parts of the engine to 
be lubricated. When condensation of the 
steam begins, the water settles below and 
raises the oil to the top. All sediment in the 
oil settles to the bottom of the cup, and the 
oil on going to feed the engine is always 
pure. The rate of flow or feed of the oil, 
is regulated by the size of the elongated 
hole I, which can be made smaller, or stopped 
altogether, by screwing the tube X X, down 
into the stem ,- the tube X X, is formed 
with a head like a screw for that purpose. 



The glass tube, D, indicating the height of 
the water and the remaining amount of oil in 
the cup. standing in the chamber, C, is within 
the circumference of the cup and is always 
hot, when the cup is in service. The object 
of the valve, /, is to shut the steam from the 
cup, and that of the faucet, M, is to- let the 
water out of the onp. To refill the cnp, when 
the steam is on, the valve, I, is closed, and the 
faucet, J/, is oponcd. When the water has run 
out, the faucet, .V, is again closed and fcbfl oil 
put in, after which the valve, I, is opened agaiu, 
and the steam passes up into the cup. These 
lubricators may be placed on the steam-pipe, 
steam-chest cover, or the cylinder-head, as 
may be desirable. They admit the steam freely 
to the lubricant, which is constantly perme- 
ated with it, and thereby kept in a free, liquid 
state. Numerous testimonials to its efficiency 
are presented. Parties desiring further infor- 
mation may obtain it from Wiester & Co., No. 
17 New Montgomery street, in this city, they 
being general agents for the Pacific Coast. 



A Pomological Curiosity. 

Many of our readers will recognise the ac- 
companying engraving as a representation of 




BUNCH OF CALIFORNIA PEARS. 

a remarkable bunch of pears, which was ex- 
hibited at the Mechanics' Institute Fair of 
this city, in 1865. The engraving has been 
made from a photograph, many of which were 
taken and distributed at the time. The pears 
were of the Louise Bonne de Jersey variety, and 
were plucked from a tree in Mr. Brigg's gar- 
den, at Marysville, and consisted of 54 in 
number. It presents another remarkable in- 
stance of the wonderful pomological produc- 
tions of California. 



Sieeha County Mines. — A Correspondent 
writes us, that the Rocky Point Mining Com- 
pany have met with flattering success in their 
operations. The tunnel has been run through 
from wall to wall, and shows a ledge of 13 feet 
in width. A working test at Strong's Metal- 
urgical works in this city, showed a result of 
$202.28 per ton. The favorable location of 
this mine, together with the advantage of am- 
ple water power, will enable the owners to 
mine and work their ore for less than $4 per 
ont. The company are now disposing of suffi- 
cient stock to erect a mill, and expect to be in 
full operation in about four months. Capital- 
ists need not look beyond our own State for 
investments in mining properties. 

Virginia City bridal couples are presented 
with silver bricks, on which is engraved their 
names and an appropriate couplet such as this: 

The joys of Heaven on earth are known 

To those who live in love alone; 

As silver gleaming in the light, 

Be e'or your joys as pure and bright. 



The "Washington Quicksilver mine, near 
Napa, turned out forty flasks of quicksilver 
last week, an increase of ten flasks over the 
previous run, with only sis men at work. 

The ore shipment from the Comstock mines 
to various mills is now about 95 tons per day. 



Patents & 



$ 



NVENTIONS. 



Telegraphies List of U. S. Patents Is- 
sued to Pacifio Coast Inventors. 

[From Official Repobts fob the Hooko and Scien- 
tific PhKjS8, DEWEY & CO.. PUBLISHKUS AMD 
D. 8. and Foreign Patent Agents] 

By Special Dispatch, Dated Washington, 
D. 0.. July 15th, 1873. 

For Week Ending July 1st, 1873." 
Harvest tit and Thiiebheb.— James H. Adam- 
son, assignor to Wm. Taylor and M. Stewart 

Taylor, S. F., Cal. 
Type.— William Shaw, Hollister, Cal. 
Engine Govebnob. — Joshua Hendy, S. F., 

Cal. 
Rotaby Blower. — Richard F. Knox, assignor 

to Palmer, Knox & Co., S. F., Cal. 
Bed Bottom.— Clinton V. B. Reeder, San Jose, 

Cal. 
Hydraulic Hoisting Apparatus. — Philip Hin- 

kle, S. F., Cal. 

*The patents are not ready for delivery by tfce 

Patent Office until some 14 days after tliedate of issue. 

Note.— Copies of U. 8. and Foreign Patents furnlBhed 
by Dewey & Co.. in the shortcut time possible (by tel- 
egraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All patent 
business for Pacific coast inventors transacted will. 
greater security and in much less time than by any other 
agency. 

Report of the Cliollar-Potosi Mining 
Company. 

The annual meeting of the Chollar-Potosi 
Mining Company was held in this city on the 
14th inst. The names of the officers will he 
found in another column. The report of the 
Superintendent makes the following state- 
ments: 

"For the year ending May 31, 1873, opera- 
tions at the Company's mine have been Btead- 
ily prosecuted with the following results: Ore 
extracted, 48,200 tons; ore reduced at mills, 
44,050 tons. Ore supplies for the past twelve 
months have been drawn from the old and long 
developed portions of the mine. Notwith- 
standing much prospecling work has been done 
in quarters of the mine that indicated the 
existence of the precious metal, our labors and 
expenditures of money are, I regret to say, 
unrewarded, and the hoped-for deposits of ore 
are undiscovered. At fourth station of shaft, 
in drift north, there are strong probabilities of 
our getting ore of average quality; every effort 
has been vainly made to reach this body of ore 
said to exist near this company's north line. 
In connection with the ordinary machinery, 
we have added a machine for compressing air 
— Baid air to be used as a motive power at low 
levels. Owing to delays in perfecting the com- 
pressor, no use has been made of it. Concern- 
ing the reserves of ore, no correct estimate 
can be made. The quantity developed at this 
time is more extensive than the known supplies 
were one year ago. During the past twelve 
months much of the ore milled was largely im- 
pregnated with base metals, causing much 
difficulty in reducing and materially curtailing 
the results in bullion." 

Of the 48,200 tons of ore extracted, 14,000 
tons were from the Blue "Wing Station, west, 
13,000 tons from the Piute, 11,150 tonB from 
Grass Eoots, and 10,050 tons from second sta- 
tion, new shaft. While the quantity extracted 
is 10,000 tons in excess of the previous year, the 
net returns were considerably less, because the 
ore turned out was of a lower grade. The 
shaft has been thoroughly overhauled and re- 
paired, and is now in complete condition. 
Though the developments made have not re- 
sulted in the discovery of paying ore, the indi- 
cations at the close are more favorable than for 
some time. The Secretary's report presents 
the following financial exhibit for the fiscal 
year: 

BEOED?TS. 

Proceeds of bullion sold $085,724 

Assessment No . 4 140,000 

Miscellaneous 6,488 

Total receipts $831,212 

Cash, per last statement 174,149 

Total $1,005,361 

dibbubsements. 

Working ores $483,255. 

Labor 198,853, 

Timber and Lumber 57.305 

Machinery and materials 43,726 

Hardware 16,037. 

Wood and Coal 12,780 

Candles and Oil 3,973: 

Freight charges 11,272 

Discount and assaying 10,891 

Office expenBeB 8,841 

Water 6,600 

Taxes 4,427 

Legal expenses 6,100 

Miscellaneous 7,302 

Total disbursements $871,968 

Cash on hand 133,393 

Total $1,005,361 

The average cost of working the 44,050 tons 
ore crushed during the year was $15.62 per 
on. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873, 
there were 5678 new incorporations foroied in 
this city; of this number 376 were for the pur- 
pose of pursuing mining operations. 

Healdsbubgh is becoming a quicksilver 
market, that town being the base of supplies 
for the miners in the vicinity. 



42 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, 1873. 



Our Half Year's Work. 

Exports of San Francisco for the Six iSonth s 
Ending 1 June 30th, 1873. 

From the following statistics, it will be Eeen that the 
Stride made in our foreign commerce during the last 
Six months has been a vast one. The whole of the ex- 
ports for the six months ending June 30th, 1872, includ- 
ing those by railroad, may be valued at $13,000,000, and 
those for the Bame period of the present year at $17,000,- 
000, showing an increase of $4,000,000, or about 32 per 
cent. This is most gratifying, especially when it is 
tafcen into consideration that, during the same period, 
our imports have, as shown by the freights paid, slight- 
ly diminished. But our exports of treasure have de- 
creased by $2,028,259, thus leaving the increase of ex- 
ports to be about 16 per cent. The decrease in the ex- 
port of gold and the increase in the export of produce 
show that our commercial system is fast righting itself 
and that we may in the future expect few such years of 
financial tightness as during the first half year of 1873. 

The following table, taken from the " Bulletin," 
shows the quantity and value of our Domestic Exports 
for the period in question: 

Articles. Quantity. Value. 

Abalones, sirs 692 $7,629 

Asphaltum, tons 12 265 

Barley, 100-lb sks 61,537 91,944 

Beans, sks 3,308 10,336 

Borax, cs 8,387 227,895 

Bran, etc. , pkgs 8,553 10,611 

Brandy, gallons 30,3391 68 f>09 

Bread, pkgs. ...."........... 7,608 20,651 

Brick.M 20 267 

Brooms, dozen 6 ,031 12,700 

Broom Corn, 1004b sks 101 • 525 

Coal, pkgs 246 343 

Corn.sks 235 323 

Cotton, fts^ 32,887 6,500 

Fish—Salmon, pkgs 22,104 161,367 

Flour.bbls 151,381 8.3,279 

Fruit, bxs 1,76/ 3,779 

Glue, pkgs 8 171 

Hay, tons 405 9,044 

Hides, no 33,420 154,701 

Laths, M 121 275 

Leather, pkgs 1 ,690 85,676 

Lime, bbls 1,768 3,623 

Live Stock 429 17,684 

Lumber, M feet 6,507 147,232 

Macaroni, cs 1,665 3,644 

Mustard Seed, 100-lb sks 7,686 20,887 

Oals, 100-115 sks 3,530 8,056 

Onions, pkgs 544 2,314 

Ores- Copper, tons 701 42,067 

Silver, tons 374 65,798 

Various, tons 521 45,352 

Pickets, no 24,000 828 

Posts, no 7,500 927 

Potatoes, pkgs 9,801 15,680 

Quicksilver, flasks 2,585 179,572 

Rosin, pkgs 45 413 

Salt, pkgs 995 810 

Seeds, pkgs 64 1,745 

Shingles, M 2,918 8,213 

Skins, etc., pkgs 235 45,906 

Spars, no 23 445 

Spirits Turpentine, pkgs 105 799 

Tallow, pkgs 183 5,645 

Vegetables, pkgs 199 579 

Wheats, 100-lb sks 4,488,035 8,712,919 

Wine, gallons 260,370) , oe . no 

" cases 31262) 18M96 

Wool, fts 198,869 55 447 

Total , $11,269,761 

The 

Destination 
Of our wheat has been nearly all to Great Britain, that 
exported to other countries not reaching an amount of 
1,000 centals. More than half of our Flour went to Chi- 
na and Japan, the balance chiefly to Central America, 
New York and Great Britain. The latter may be con- 
sidered a new market. Australia and New Zealand took 
five-sixths of our Barley export; China and the Hawaiian 
Islands two-thirds of tHe OatB exported; and New York 
all the Wool, with the exception of 11,824 lbs. which 
went to Great Britain. All our Hides found their way 
to New York; nearly all our Quicksilver to China and 
Mexico. All our Wine, save about 10,000 gallons, went 
to New York. The following table exhibits clearly the 
destination of all our principal exports: 

Flour, 

Value. 

New York, bbls 10,294 559,328 

Great Britain 12,677 64,363 

China 8,664 432,672 

Japan 4,375 25,851 

Philippine Islands 2,800 14,815 

Society Islands 3,352 18,794 

Hawaiian Islands 4,362 23 ,330 

Navigator Islands .50 290 

Guayaquil, S. A 3,000 15,750 

Central America 16 ,842 94,760 

Panama 6,350 35,869 

Mexico 1,094 5,366 

BritiBh Columbia 854 4,582 

Russian Possessions 5 ,167 27,509 

Totals 151,381 $823,279 

Wheat. 

Great Britain, 100-flj sks 4,487,066 $8,711,076 

Japan 16 31 

Society Islands 395 755 

Hawaiian Islands 389 716 

Central America 56 330 

Panama 2 4 

BritiBh Columbia Ill 207 

Totals 4,488,035 $8,712,919 

Barley. 

China, 100-lb Bks 60 $73 

Japan 46 62 

Australia 37,349 57,620 

New Zealand 15,400 22,400 

Society Islands 1,804 2,3 18 

Hawaiian Islands 221 289 

Central America. 293 430 

Panama 5 10 

Mexico 175 234 

British Columbia 6,184 8,508 

Totals 61,537 $91,944 

Oats. 

China, 100-lb sks 1,124 2,643 

Japan 443 1,071 

Hawaiian Islands 1,201 2,658 

Central America 228 562 

Panama 106 247 

Mexico 128 298 

British Columbia 300 677 

Totals , 3,530 $8,056 



Wool, 

New York, lbs i87",04§ 

Great Britain 11,824 

Totals., 198,869 



*53,447" 
2,000 



New York, no 33,420 

Quicksilver. 

China, flaBks I- 000 

Japan • ■.'"» ''• jj0 

Australia •* l^ 5 

Peru 300 

Mexico 1.1*2 

Panama 1 

British Columbia " 



Totals. . 



New York, tons. . 
Great Britain 



Totals 

Wines. 
Gallons. 
New York 250,448 



Great Britain.. 

China 

Japan 

New Zealand 

Hawaiian Islands — 

Society Islands 

Peru 

Central America 

Panama 

Mexico 

BritiBh Columbia.... 
Russian Possessions.. 



1,643 
342 
662 

114 
180 
314 

1,868 
971 

2,664 
624 
540 



2,585 

651 
945 

1,506 

Cases. 
1,042 
60 
76 
229 
25 
112 
109 

560 
51 
458 



$55,447 

$154,701 

$68,850 
2,180 
7,260 
21,421 
79,260 



$52,978 
100,229 



$153,207 

Value. 

$167,127' 

1,311 

557 

1,831 

138 

804 

572 

171 

4,893 

1,339 

4,037 

452 

3,264 



Totals 260,370 3,262 $186,496 

Our Merchandise Exports by Water 
For the half year have aggregated $13,658,595, as against 
$7,662,387 for the first half of 1872, showing an increase 
of $5,996,238, or nearly 79 per cent. This is on the 
whole, for the exports to New York show a falling off of 
upwards of a million dollars; those to the Hawaiian 
Islands of $8,640; those to British Columbia of $15,638; 
those to Mexico of $39,784; and thoBe to Japan of $126,- 
959. In fact, exports to all countries, save Great Brit- 
ain, Australia, New Zealand, Society Islands and Philip- 
pine, show a decided falling off. But the increase to 
Great Britain alone, in itself nearly six hundred per 
cent, is more than sufficient to make up for a hundred 
such losses. 

The following tables show the exports by water for 
the first half years of 1872 and 1873, to all countries with 
which we have communication; the details of the ex- 
ports of Flour and Wheat for the same periods ; and the 
weight in pounds of the export by railroad, for the first 
five montns of the year : ■ 

Exports by Sea for the First Six Months of 
1873 and 1873. 
1872. 

New York $2,489,742 

Great Britain 1 ,653,582 



Hawaiian Islands.. 

British Columbia 

Mexico 

China 

Japan 

Australia 

New Zealand 

East Indies 

South Sea Islands.... 

Fiji Islands 

Society Islands 

Philippine Islands. . . . 
Navigator's Islands... 

Guayaquil, S. A 

Chile 

Peru 

Central America 

Panama ' 

Russian Possessions. ., 



278,767 

364,002 

637,731 

679,269 

516,580 

55,416 

10,449 

36,614 

11,359 

500 

108,585 

11,394 



1873. 
$1,307,441 
9,118,908 
230,127 
347,864 
597,977 
771,922 
389,621 
121,095 
29,329 



55,383 
164,833 
261,144 

176,517 
150,490 



117,263 
14,865 
12,478 
25,270 
18,410 
138,337 
188,562 
138,308 
90,818 



Total $7,662,357 $13 ; 658,595 

Exports of Wheat and Flour for the First 

Six Months of 1872 and 1873. 

Floue. 

1871-72. 

New York, bbls 4,333 

Great Britain 9,862 

China 149,097 



Japan . 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Java 

Singapore 

Africa 

Fiji Islands 

Philippine Islands. . . . 

Society Islands 

Hawaiian Islands. . . '. 
South Sea Islands... 
Navigator's Islands.. 

Peru 

Guayaquil, S. A 

Central America 

South America 

Panama 

Mexico 

BritiBh Columbia 

Russian Possessions. . 



7,687 
2,251 
500 
6,880 
1,250 

"25 

8,056 

6,758 

6,660 

80 

"200 

38!l46 

7 1442 
12,070 
2,913 
5,543 



Totals 269,753 

Wheat. 

1871-72. 

New York, 100-lb sks 14,801 

Great Britain 1 ,351,064 

France 34,986 

6 

234 



1872-73 
13,566 
15,874 
126,326 
7,652 
16,318 
1,250 



2,500 



5,000 

5,972 

7,800 

231 

50 

240 

3,000 

35,204 

506 

12,664 

1,334= 

2,815 

5,167 



1872-73. 

8,368 

9,798,913 



China. 
Japan . 

Australia , 

Java 

Africa 

Society Islands.... 
Hawaiian Islands. 
Central America... 

Panama 

Mexico 

British Columbia. . 



1,116 
16 

28,971 



1,395 
284 



18 
858 



2,042 
718 



2 

1 

525 



Totals 1,404,8 



Railroad 

Base Bullion, lbs. 19,345 

Beans 41,181 

Borax 100,600 

Butter, 102,634 

Case Goods 42,315 

Coffee 1,835,588 

Cotton 123,616 

Fish 544,668 

Flour 162,350 

Furs and Skins. . . 74,455 

Glue 147,177 

Hides and Pelts.. 264,915 

Hops 74,952 

Horns 19,000 



Exports. 
Lead Bars, lbs.... 

Leather 

Merchandise 

Nuts 

Oil 

Plows 

Quicksilver 

Silk 

Sugar 

Syrup... 

Tea 

Wine 

Wool, Domestic.. 
Wool, Australian . 



41,980 

610,387 

430,769 

149,080 

6,340 

61,600 

157,860 

287,017 

39,620 

39,266 

1,963,638 

1,183,735 

8,118,916 

866,493 



Total 17,509,797 



Three thousand dollars were recently ob- 
tained from six pans of gravel, out of the 
Moser & Haworth claim, Calaveras county. 



Tiie Emma Mine. 

The Salt Lake Journal says! We are happy 
to be able to announce that the Emma, the Very 
queen of Utah mines, has again assumed, in a 
partial but encouraging degree, her former 
position as a grand silver ore producing mine. 
From various causes the Emma has been un- 
der a eloud for several months, and the bad 
effects of the evil croakings in England and 
America concerning the unfortunate situation 
of the mine, have had a most depressing effect 
on the mining prospects of Utah, here and 
abroad. The mine was for a long time the lead- 
ing one of the Territory, and better known the 
world over, perhaps, than any in the country, 
next to the Comstock Lode. The so called fail- 
ure of the mine acted as a wet blanket on all 
operations in Utah mines here and abroad. 
Every one thought, because the Emma had 
failed and British stockholders had lost largely 
in their investments in its stock, that there 
could be nothing in Utah. The mine repre- 
sented to the great mass of the people, Utah's 
mineral wealtn, and when it fell, everything in 
the Territory got a ( ' black eye, ' ' as they say on 
change. It is for this reason that we are glad 
to be able to say on excellent authority that the 
Emma is again in a most flourishing condition. 
Work is now being done on a large body of ore, 
which was discovered some months since, and 
which we alluded to at the time, and ore is now 
being shipped and sold here in considerable 
quantities which assays, in the sample mill, 
55034 ounces of silver to the ton, and. carries 
fifty per cent, of lead. A number of tons of 
this grade have already beeD sold at this rate, 
and a large quantity ia awaiting shipment. 
Two car loads going 200 ounces to the ton were 
sampled yesterday, and plenty more is coming. 

Under these circumstances, and with the 
promising future before it, we cannot hesitate 
to congratulate the stockholders on the bril- 
liant promise of the mine, and express our sat- 
isfaction at the agreeable turn of affairs which 
have been going somewhat adverse to the best 
interests of the Territory. 

Contemplated Water Project. — Ever since 
the purchase of the ditches and water rights on 
the Georgetown divide, by the California Water 
Company, it has been surmised that this com- 
pany had in view no less an undertaking than 
that of eventually supplying the towns of the 
Valleys, from Sacramento to San Francisco, 
with pure, crystal water from the mountains. 
Subsequent operations of this company have 
tended strongly to confirm these suspicions. 
The substantial character and enlarged capacity 
of all their improvements along their present 
canals; the large force at present employed in 
extending their works to the South Fork 
and the outlets of Loon Lake, Pleasant Lake 
and many others, with their survey extending to 
the Rubicon; the employment of Mr. Amos 
Booman, a thoroughly competent engineer and 
surveyor, to make a topographical survey and 
map of the entire route, and of the whole region 
of country lying between the south and middle 
fork of the American river, are sufficient evidence 
that this water company means business of no 
ordinary dimensions. That these cities and 
towns will at some future time be supplied 
with water from the mountains, and that the 
California Water Co. has in contemplation 
this vast project, is no longer a matter of doubt. 
The enterprise is a vast one, yet[it possesses all 
the requisites of success, viz: an unlimited 
supply of water, a practicable route, already 
demonstrated such by their present ditches 
traversing the first sixty miles from the moun- 
tain lakes and rivers to the very foot hills of 
the plains, and a demand for the water as ever- 
lasting as it is inevitable. The character of 
the men engaged in this enterprise, the capital 
at their command, it is believed, are commen- 
surate with the undertaking. — El Dorado Re- 
publican. 

Hydraulic Mining. — A gentleman returning 
from a tour through the mining districts of 
Nevada county, before leaving for San Fran- 
cisco yesterday, expressed to us his surprise at 
the number and extent of the mining opera- 
tions in successful working in almost every 
part of the upper -portions of our county. 
There iB no question, though we make little 
blow about it, that Nevada is the banner coun- 
ty of the State in hydraulic and quartz mining. 
We have, it is true, no Xosemites to attract 
pleasure seekers to this locality, and no wild 
cat speculations to place upon California street, 
but when the narrow gauge is in running or- 
der from Colfax we expect to attract hither in- 
dividuals who desire to make permanent in- 
vestments, but are so delicately constituted as 
to be deterred by the fear of a ride of some 
ten or twelve miles over a stage road. We will 
have palace cars on our narrow, gauge express- 
ly for the accommodation of such, and shall 
then expect to see them " flocking as doves to 
our windows." — Grass Valley Union. 

White Pine Tailings. — Emulating the suc- 
cess of the Washoe Tailings Mills, one of the 
same description is being erected at Sherman- 
town, White Pine, by J. B. Osborne. The 
News says five pans will be added to the mill, 
and a powerful engine is now being placed in 
position. Mr. Osborne has been trying to 
work the tailings with insufficient material, but 
will now erect works competent to do the work. 

Rich quartz has been found in the Cceur 
d'Aleue mountains, and brought into Walla- 
Walla. 



Sir Samuel Baker's Discoveries.— London, 
July 7. — The Berald's correspondent at Khar- 
toun telegraphs, via Alexandria, confirming the 
arrival of Sir Samuel and Lady Baker and 
party, all the details of which are known from 
previous dispatches. He adds: 

"Sir Samuel Baker succeeded in organizing 
district governments, appointing superintend- 
ents, and making Fatiko the chief station, 
Gondokooro being next in importance. He al- 
so established eight other principal posts, which 
form a connected chain from Nubia toNyanza, 
and obtained one thousand additional troops. 
An important geographical discoverer is said to 
have been made, which will astound the scien- 
tific world, as it is said thatLak s Tanganyika 
and Albert Nyanza prove to be one and the 
same body of water, and a magnificent inland 
sea, 700 miles in length. It is further announced 
that vessels can be landed above the falls 
named Sir Roderick Murchison, and sail to 
Ujiji. Sir Samuel Baker and party were in ex- 
cellent health, and were to leave at once for 
Souakim, en route to Suez." The above nar- 
rative is direct from the explorer's lips. 

In everydirection for a distance of fifty miles 
up and down the San Ynez valley, by a width of 
ten or twelve miles, the country is covered by 
a dense growth of white oak timber; down to 
the coast it exists- in about the same quantities 
as in this section. We measured several trees 
that were eighteen feet in circumference, many 
of which contained not less than_twenty cords 
of four foot fire-wood, each. The question is, 
can this vast body of timber, amounting to 
many millions of cords of wood, be cut, trans- 
ported and put into market at rates that will 
leave a margin for profit ? As a railroad is 
doubtless practicable from the ocean to this great 
forest we believe it would pay to build a cheap 
railroad, for the transportation of this wood to 
tide water, if for no other purpose. The sub- 
ject is worthy the attention of capitalists, 
inasmuch as the timber resources of the coast 
counties, at least those contiguous to market, 
are very nearly exhausted. — Santa Barbara 
Index. 

Another Quicksilver Discovery. — We were 
shown to-day, says the Petaluma Argus of the 
8th instant, a specimen of cinnabar that was 
discovered in this county, a few miles from the 
Geyser Springs, in a westerly direction. W. 
Forbes, of Lakeport, is one of the principal 
owners of the mine, which was discovered 
about six weeks ago by Messrs. McKay, Sloper 
and Snow. The specimens are undoubtedly 
the richest "croppings" ever yet discovered, 
and if a well defined lode is developed, the 
mine will certainly prove a source of great 
wealth. The mineral wealth of Sonoma coun- 
ty is still in iit infancy, yet we predict that 
a few years from now our mines will develop 
a profitable revenue. 



The Trinity Journal says: Mr. Jos. McGilli- 
vray, has Jately purchased another right of 
water in Canon Creek, and we are informed, 
intends to convey water to the mines of Red 
Hill and vicinity. The ditch will be of the 
capacity to carry five thousand inches of water , 
and the water will be taken across Trinity river 
in a large iron pipe to the top of Red Hill, at a 
hight to cover all the known mines up and 
down the river for eight miles. The cost of 
this undertaking will be not less than sixty or 
seventy thousand dollars, but when completed 
cannot fail to yield a large profit, for the mines 
to be supplied by it are known to be extremely 
rich. 

An ordinance has been read the first time in 
the Board of Aldermen of Virginia City, which 
provides that no Giant or Hercules powder, gun 
cotton, nitro-glycerine, or gasoline shall be 
stored or kept within the city limits; that not 
more than ten cases of coal oil of ten gallons 
each shall be kept in any one building, and 
that not more than twenty-five pounds of gun, 
blasting or black powder shall be kept in any 
place of business in the city, and that the latter 
shall be kept in metallic cases, secure from fire. 
The penalty for a violation of the ordinance is 
a fine of not lesB than $20 nor more than $500, 
or imprisonment for not less than ten dayB nor 
more than six months, for each offense. 



The Territorial Enterprise says: The water in 
the Carson river is becoming quite low; it is not 
as low, however, as it was at this time two 
years ago. The Eureka Mill, the largest on the 
river, is still running to its full capacity. The 
millmen do not fear losing much time this 
summer. They think they will be able to run 
the most of their machinery during the entire 
season, and say that as soon as the weather 
begins to grow cold, this fall, the water will in- 
crease in volume, from the,decrease in evapora- 
tion, probably. 

The Ventura Signal learns that at the Pirn 
mines there are now about sixty men at work. 
They are doing well, working in rich ore, and 
a quartz mill will soon be erected by parties 
from San Francisco. Trade mostly goes to 
Bakersfield. This is a trade we should have, 
the mines are in our county and quite near us. 

Interesting to Tobacco Users. — Dr. J. 
Richardson, of Philadelphia, has discovered 
that the corpuscles of the saliva aie migrating 
white blood-globules. So the more you spit 
the more you rob your system of blood. 
Smokers and tobacco chewers will do well to 
take notice. 



The Japanese Mint has already coined 15,- 
500,000 pieces of gold and silver, valued at 

$20,178,000, 



July ig, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



43 



DEWEY Sc CO., 

American & Foreign Patent Agents, 

OFFICE. W MONTGOMERY STREET. S. F. 

The best, speediest, and surest method for you 
to obtain patents, file caveats, or transact 
any other important business with the Patent 
Office at Washington, or with foreign coun- 
tries, is through the agency of DEWEY & 
CO., 1M ItUSHEKS Of "THE MINING 
AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS, SAN EUAN- 
CISCO, an able, responsible, and long-estab- 
lishud firm, and thu principal agents on this 
side of the continent. They refer to the thous- 
ands of inventors who have patronized them, 
and to all prominent business men of the 
Pkefflo Coast, who are more or less familiar 
with their reputation as straightforward jour- 
nalists and patent solicitors and counsellors. 

We not only more readily apprehend the points 
and secure much more fully and quickly the 
patents for our home inventors, but with the 
influence of our carefully read and extensively 
circulated journals, wo are enabled to illus- 
trate the intrinsic merits of their patents, and 
secure a due reward to the inventor, besides 
serving the public who are more ready to give 
a fair trial, and adopt a good thing, upon 
the recommondation of honest and intelligent 
publishers. 

To Obtain Patent, 

well-constructed model is generally first need- 
ed, if the invention can well be thus illustrated. 
It must not exceed 12 inches in length or 
hight. When practicable, a smaller model is 
oven more desirable. Paint or engrave the 
name of the article, and the namo of the 
inventor, and his address upon it. 

Send tho model (by express or other reliable 
conveyance), plainly addressed, to "Ukwkv 
& Co., Mining and Scientific Press Office, 
San Francisco." At the same time, send a 
full description, embodying all the ideas and 
claims of the inventor respecting the im- 
provement describing the various parts and 
their operations. 

Also send $15 currency, amount of first fee of 
tho Government. The case will be placed on 
our regular file, the drawings executed, and 
the documents made up, and soon Bent to tho 
inventor for signing. 

As soon as signed and returned to us with the 
fees then duo us, it will bo sent straightway 
to the Patent Office at Washngton. 

When the invention consists of a now article of 
manufacture, a medicine, or a new composi- 
tion, samples of the separated ingredients, 
sufficient to make the experiment (unless 
they are of a common and well-known char- 
acter), and also of the manufactured article 
itself, must be furnished, with full description 
of the entire preparation. 

For Processes, frequently no model or drawingr, 
are necessary. In such case, the applicant 
has only to send us an exact description, and 
what is desirable to claim. 

For designs no models are necessary. Dupli- 
cate drawings are required, and the specifica- 
tions and other papers should be made up 
with care and accuracy. In some instances for 
design patents two photographs, with the 
negative, answer -well instead of drawings. 

For further information, send a stamp for our 
illustrated circular, containing a digest of Pa- 
tent Laws, 112 illustrated mechanical move- 
ments, and Hints and Instructions regarding 
tho rights and privileges of inventors and 
patentees, which will be furnished post paid. 
Also a copy of NEW PATENT LAW of 1870. 

Address DEWEY & CO., 

Publishers, Patent Agents and Engravers,. 
No. 338 Montgomery street, S. F. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK, 

Incorporated In Geneva, Switzerland, Janu- 
ary 20th, 1873. 

iikad opfiob, in oasfeVA. 
CAPITAL, TWO MILLION DOLLARS 

SunscuinKD.— Osj:-CjCAJtTEB Paid Ci\ 
PRESIDENT HENRY HENTSCH. 

SAN FRAN0IS00 BEANOH, 

SUCCESSORS TO MESSRS. HENTSCH k BERTON, 
627 CLAY STREET. 8. F. 
Directors: 
FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT "WATT. 

This Bank is prepared !o grant Lettora of OndH on 
Ku [-<>"■>, uml to tWlttot ovary kind of Hank mi:. M < 

and Bxchmngo BiuIdoos, and <•> negotiate American Securi- 
ties ia t 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON: 

Now York, Hamburg, Wlnt«rttiar, Baden, 

Liverpool, R)-Uin/.oua. Bern. J tiny, 

Lrondon, Hurl i n . Neuchan-l, Hhalflinuaen, 

Paris, l'rnnkiort, Locarno, Fribuorg, 

Lvoqs, Geneva, Ub.aux.-do- Lucom, 

ISorlciiiii, Zurich. Foods, A&raii, 

Marseille h, Hom.-), Solotliurn, LuKtino, 

Brussels, 8r. Call, Lausanne, MendrUlo. 

A.11 A*x:i\ Office 

Is annexed to tho Bank. Assay* of goM. i-ilvor. <|uartz, 
01 ,.. :uil ttulphuri'l*. Hutu rim in uniti or 1mm, nt tho option 

1 1 !n- depositor. Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any jiart of tho 
country, and returns made through Wolls, Fargo A- Co.. or 
by checks. lv'J7-Jin 



PACIFIC LAMP MANUFACTORY. 

EMILG 1$*t:^< II, 
Patentee and Manufacturer of 

LAMPS. LANTERNS AND REFLECTORS. 

802 MuNTCOMEBY StRKET, 8aJ* FhASCIHCO. 



Richardson & Co.. Copper Ore Wharves, 

Richardson A Co. have been for thirty years established 
in S'.uiiisuaiH Agent* lor tho preparation Sampling, Assay- 
ing, and .sale of Copper, Silver, Gold, Lead. '/-inf. and all 
other Ores and Motala, for which they have extensive Ware- 
houses and Wharves under cover, 1,1100 feet of Quay Front- 
age within the Floating Dock, and the most complete Ma- 
chinery and Appliances. They arc also pi cparod to make 
advances against Ores in anticipation of realization, and to 
guarantee all payments when required. 2ov2G ly 



NICKEL PLATING. 

The San Francisco Nickel Plating: Company 
Are prepared to plate articles of all descriptions, of any 
metal. Cutlery, Liquor Flasks, Pistols, Suns, Swords, Bri- 
dle Bitts, Polo Crabs.Hub Bands, DaBh Rails, and all arti- 
cles of household hardware plated at short notice, and 
warranted. Nickel Plate never tarnishes or corrodeB, 
always retaining its polish until the article is worn out. 
Office at the KIMBALL MANUFACTORY WORKS, Cor. 
Fourth and Bryant Streets. 12v2C-3ni 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

632 California street, corner of Webb. 



For the half year ending with the 30th of June, 1873, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of nine and 
six-tenths (9 6-10) per cent, per annum on Term depos- 
its, and eight (8) per cent, per annum on Ordinary 
deposits, free of Federal tax, payable on and after July 
14th, 1873. By order. 

LOVELL WHITE Cashier. 



FAIRBANKS 




X 1 1 13 ONLY RKL.IABLE 

STANDARD. 



6,000 to 40,000 pounds capacity. Length of 
platform to snit purchaser. Tho same scale is used for 
weighing cattle, hogs, etc. Scales adapted to all 
branches of business. Address 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 

537 Market street. 
Agents for MILES' ALARM MONEY DRAWERS, a 
sure protection against till thieves. lCv2ocowbp0m 




DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAVINGS ANOTOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 619 Clay Street San Francisco. 

At a meeting of the Board of Director's, held this day, 
a dividend was declared for the six months ending June 
80, 1873, of nine and six-tenths (9 6-10) per cent, per 
annum on all deposits, free of Federal Tax, and payable 
on and after the 16th Inst. 

CYRTJ$ W. OARMANY, Cashier. 

San FranciBCO, July 8, 1873. jy!2-2t 



Improve Your Poultry. 

It Costs No More to Keep Good 
Fowls than Poor Ones ! 

SEND STAMP FOR ILLUSTRATED 
CIRCULAR 

Containing a full description of all 

the best known and moBt profitable 

Fowls in the country to 

GEO. B. BAYLEY, 
Importer and Breeder of Blooded 
Fowls, antl agent for the Poultry Would, a monthly 
magazine devoted entirely to Poultry— tells how to keep 
Fowls for pleasure and PROFIT. Subscription only 
$1.25 per year. Address 

GEO. B. BAYLEY, Box 659, San Francisco. 
2Gv2H-aw bp 

SCIENTIFIC BOOKS FOR FARMERS 
AND GARDENERS. 

The lateRt works on Architecture, Agriculture, Poul- 
try, Domestic Animals, Small Fruits and Floriculture. 

Special orders will be made for anything not in stock 
without extra charge. Send for Catalogues. 

A. L. BANCROFT & CO., 

Booksellers and Stationers, 
23v26-eow San Francisco, Cal. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

Froiseth's New Sectional, Topographical 
and Mineral 

MAP OF UTAH. 

Size, 40 by 66 Inches; Scale, 8 Miles to an Inch. 

Handsomely engraved on stone, colored in counties, 
and mounted on cloth, showing the CountieB, Towns, 
Rivers, Lakes, Railroads, Mines and Mining Districts 
throughout the Territory, and all Government Subveys 
made to date. Price, mounted, $8; Pocket form, $6. 
Mailed to any part of the United States, on receipt of 
price, by A. L. BANCROFT & CO., 721 Market street, 
Ban FranciBCO, Cal., or by B. A. M. FROISETH, Pub- 
lisher, Salt Lake City, Utah. 10v26-tf 




igglfaSSi 


Hi»f£r!i? 




assises:; 
eSEffgSZSS 




"o eg -sis- 
"-° ^S 3 So r 



lVe-w Ifctininer &, Mill LijrlitH- 

MANUFACTORY, 

N. E. corner Montgromery and Jackson sts., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



The Most Complete Invention for Opening- 
Cans ever Invented. 

No family that uses canned Fruits, Vegetables, Sar- 
dines or OyBters, should be without one of these con- 
venient household tools. No Restaurant, Hotel or 
OyBter Saloon can afford to do without one. It will 
cut any Bbapcd hole, from a triangle to a perfect circle. 
One sample sent postage free for 75 cents. 

WIESTER k 00,, 
17 New Montgomery st. (under Grand Hotel) , S. F. 



MONTGOMERY'S HOTEL, 

227 and 229 Second street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Thia Hotel has been newly furnished, and is situated in a 

central and healthy location, and is one of the few 

Hotels in Sun Francisco conducted 011 

Temperance Principles. 

BOARD, PEE WEEK, $3.50. BOARD AND LODGING, $4 TO $5. 
BLX MEAL TICKETS FOR $1. 

OH AH. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

0Sr~ Passengers and Baggage taken to the Hotel free. «ffiff 
6v26-awbp 



The California Powder Works 

No. 314 CAI.IfilK.MA STKEKT, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 
Manufacturers and have constantly on band 
SPORTING, 

MINING, 

And TIIL1A.-TING 

POWDER, 

Of SUPERIOR QUALITY, FRESH FROM THE 
MILLS. It being constantly receiyod and transported 
Into tho Interior, is delivered to tbe consumer within a 
few days of tbe time of its manufacture, and is in every 
way superior to any other Powder in Market. 

Wo have been awarded successively 

Three Grold Medals 

By tbe MECHANICS' INSTITUTE and tho STATE AQ- 
RIOULTURAL SOCIETY for the superiority of our 
products over all others. 
We also call attention to our 

HERCULES POWDER. 

Which combines all the force of other strong explosive 
now in use, and the lifting force of the best blasting 
powder, thus making it vastly superior to any other 
pompound now in uso. 

A circular containing a full description of this Pow- 
der can be obtained on application to our Office. 



16v20-3m 



JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 



BURLEIGH 
ROCK DRILLS 

— AND — 

Air Compressors. 



The Burleigh Rock Drills, which have stood the test 
of Ave years' constant use at the Hoosac Tunnel, and 
which are now in use in nearly every State in the Union, 
as well as in Europe and South America, are unequaled 
in efficiency and economy by any other Drilling Ma- 
chine. They are of various sizes, and equally well 
adapted to Tunneling, Shafting, Open Cut or Quarry- 
ing, and will drill six to ten inches per minute in gran- 
ite. They are driven by steam above ground. The Bur- 
leigh Air Compressor is the best engine yet devised for 
furnishing the "air motor" for the many purposes to 
which it is now being uBed. 

They are to be used on the St. Gothard Tunnel, Swit- 
zerland; Tunnel 13 miles long. We refer to the follow- 
ing gentlemen and works : 

Gen. Newton, TJ. S. A Hell Gate Tunnel, L. I 

Mess. Shanley Hoosac Tunnel, Mass 

J. Dutton Steele Nesquehoning Tunnel, Pa 

Sidney Dillon Fourth Avenue Work, N. Y 

Col. Roebling EaBt River Bridge Company, N. Y 

For further information, etc., address 

L. C. PARKE, 

VIRGINIA CITY, NEVADA. 
Agent for the Pacific Coast. fl5 



Directory. 



Menzo Spring— Manufacturer of the Dr. 

Illy Artificial I.iinbn, lid a removed from 101 Jennie Btreet 
to 186 Tehama street, nour northeast corner of Third and 
Tehama, and between Howard ami Folsom streets. Ail- 
dro-s Mi'ii/a Spring, UKi Tohamn ut., San Francisco. Onl. 



^Hm^B "-">• "'a'") .,! _ s.V., cureat'atarrh, 

^F/^9 Deal hum, Eur Discharges. DeiurtnitU'B. and 

*■ mm nil Ej>\ Far, Look, Llver.Kidney.Blood, Nerve, 

^■_^F t lir.inic, Special and Men'* L»i«easea. Friendly 

^mf advice; nkilliul treatment for all Invalids. 

▼ Medirlnes - u i ■ 1 1 1 l i ■ d . Hours, 10 to 4 and 6 to 8. 

Coll or Slice. Ladies, married or binfele, speedily oured of 

any ill health. 23v26 



Diamond Drill Co. 

The undersigned, owners of LESCHOT'S PATENT 
for DIAMONDPOINTED DRILLS, now brought to the 
highest state of perfection, are prepared to fill orders 
for the IMPROVED PROSPECTING and TUNNELING 
DRILLS, with or without power, at short notice, and 
at reduced prices. Abundant testimony furnished of 
the great economy and successful working of numerous 
machines in operation in the quartz and gravel mines 
on this coast. Circulars forwarded, and full informa- 
tion given upon application. 

A. 3, SEVERANCE & CO. 

Office, No. 315 California street, Rooms 16 and 17. 
2tv26-tf 



OAKEY & SON'S EMEEY AND BLACK 
LEAD MILLS, Blackfriar's Road, London, England. 

OAKEY'S WELLINGTON KNIFE POLISH. 
I'acketa, 3d. each; tins, fal.. Is., 2s. lid., and 4s. each. 

OAKET'S INDIA RUBBER KNIFE 
BOARDS from la. (id. oaeh. 

OAKEY'S SILVERSMITHS' SOAP (NON 
(MERCURIAL), tor Oloanaing and Polishing Silver, Elec- 
tro-plate. Plate-Khi'w, Marble, etc. Tablets 6d. oaoh 

OAKEY'S GENUINE EMERY, GRAIN 
AND FLOUR. 

OAKEY'S EMERY AND GLASS CLOTH. 

OAKEY'S CABINET GLASS PAPER, 
BLAOK LEAD. etc. 

OAKEY'S GOODS SOLD EVERYWHERE 
by IronmongerSt Grocers, Oilmen, Brushmakers, Drug- 
(a»ta.et«. . 21v25-ly 



H. C. BENNETT, 
MTATISTXOIAI*/. 

Reports and estimates made about all departments of 



RICHARD H. STRETCH, Civil Engineer, 

City and. County Surveyor. 

Offic-Room 1C, City Hall. Ilv24-3m 



OILKS I). Mi.' V. 



J4MK8 M. UilTO. 



GRAY & HAVEN, 

ATTORNEYS AND COrNSiaOKS AT LAV, 

In Building of Pacific Insurance Co., N. K. corner Call- 

r ornla an< Leldesdorll streetj, 

SAM PRANOIOO. 



JOHN ROACH, Optician, 

429 Montgomery Street, 
S. W. corner Sacramento. 



. BAKTL1N0. 



DKHKT KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Rulers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

505 Clay street, (Boutliwcst cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO, 



J. F. PAGES, 

8 K A. L E IV G R A.-V E R, 

AND LEITH CUTTER. 

Brasa and Steel Stamps and Dies, 008 Sacramento Btrec I, 

8an Francisco. Orders by express promptly attended to. 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS AJVI> MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt'a Brass Foundry). 

N. W. corner Natoma and Fremont streets, S. F. En- 
trance on Natoma Btreet. 6v23-3m 



San Francisco Cordage Company. 

Established 1856. 
We have just added a large amount of new machinery of 
he latent and u. o-t improved kind, and are again prepared 
ofill orders lor Rope ot any special lengiheand sizes. Con- 
stantly on hand a large stock of Manila Rope, all sizes; 
Tarred Manila ftope ; Hay Rope ; Whalo Line, etc., etc. 

TUBBS & CO., 

17v2C-tf Cll and G13 Front street, San Francisco. 



The Merchants' Exchange Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, One Million Dollars. 

LEVI STEVENS President. 

R.N. VAN BRUNT Cashier. 

BANKING HOUSE, 

No. 415 California street, Ban Francisco. 

25v20-qy 

DB. ABORN, 
Physician and Operating Surgeon 

FOB, CHRONIC DISEASES, 

213 GEARY STREET, - - - SAN FRANCISCO. 
Diseases of a chronic and ohstinate character, espec- 
ially such cases as have for years, or a lifetime, resisted 
the ordinary modes of treatment, are tbe class of mala- 
dies in the treatment of which Dr. Aborn has become 
pre-eminent on the Pacific Coast, as well as throughout 
the Union, and by his success has acchieved for him- 
self an enviable reputation. 2Sv25-ly 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STB EIi FE ISTS. 
Soldby all Dealers throughout the World. 



19v26-ly 



CHAKLES F. KIROHNEB, 

Sampler and Crusher of Ores, 

NO. .11 DRTJMM STREET, 

San Francisco. 



PATRICK GIBBONS, 

Sole Proprietor for tbe Pacific StateB and Territories, of 
VAN PAPPELENDAM'S PATENT 

Metallic Roofing and Wall Tiles, 

(Patented June 13th, 1871.) 

San Fiianoisco Office— At Messrs. Tbanoh & Knox,. 
513 California street. 
Residence— 308 Tenth Btreet, Oakland, Cal. jn21.3n? 



44 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July ig, 1873. 



(Continued from Page 37.) 



They are drifting and Binking, and the quality of ore 
raised is steadily improving. 

The English Co. on the Kansas Extension are working 
their property steadily, crushing the ore at their mill 
in Black Hawk. 

A most worthy, and highly "beneficial enterprise to 
the development of the mines above RusBell district, is 
the tunnel which has been bravely and persistently 
driven towards the heart of Clifton mountain for sev- 
eral years. This tunnel starts from near Russell Gulch, 
and has now attained a length of nearly 700 ft. It i6 
designed to cut the lodes that rib this mountain at a 
depth that will enable them to be worked to much 
greater advantage than by means of shafts. 

Cleak Creek County.— Bennett & Chapman have cut 
the enormously rich Saco mine above Georgetown with 
their tunnel, and after going through three feet of 500 
ounce silver ore haTt not reached the inside wall of the 
mine. ThiB proves, that the portion of the Saco leased 
by them will exceed in richness and extent even the 
wonderful product of other parts of this lode. 

Pake County.— Mining affairs are prosperous in Park 
County, and the Mines, especially the Moose and Hia- 
watha, are turning out very profitably. Clark & Smith 
are working 200 men on their five mile placer property 
at Fairplay. The Phillips mine is supplying iron for 
Dudley's and Hill's works. Dudley's works have been 
crowded with work since they started last season and 
are very successful. Fairplay is growing rapidly. 
There are but few idle men in Park county at present. 

Idaho. 

The Weather, Watek and Mines. — Idaho World, 
July 10: During the past week it has been warm and 
sultry, though the nights have been cool and pleasant. 
The effect of the " warm spell" has been to dry up, to 
some extent, the water, and diminish the quantityrun- 
ning in the ditches. On the other side of the Basin, 
near Placerville, the water has gradually failed, until 
but little, if any, is now running in the ditches at that 
camp, though Crowly, Brogan & Co. still have a fair 
supply on their diggings at Granite Creek. Messrs. 
Eisler & Hughes run no water through thtir ditches to 
their diggings at Lady's Crevice, and vicinity, though 
they still have water on their claims in Ophir Creek. 
Centreville is still well supplied with water by means 
of Channell's and Goldtrap's ditches. Hon. Ben. Wil- 
son, of Pioneer City, owning about all the ditches in 
that camp, still has an abandance of water, and our old 
friend, Bob McGinness.whom we met at Placerville last 
Sunday, informed us that mining oparations were in 
full blast in tiiat section, with everybody at work. 
Around Idaho City the water is gradually failing in 
several ditches. Willis & Driscol with a fair supply in 
their ditch are still running their claims on Gold Hill, 
while West & Ralston, who get their water from the 
"Big Ditch," are still working their claims in Bear Run. 
Tompkins & Lambing having their own ditch, are still 
at work on their hill claims between this place and 
Moretown, though we understand that their water is 
failing and in a few days they will be compelled to 
Buspend operations for this season. Quite a number of 
claims are still being worked on the South side of 
Moore Creek, being furnished with water from the 
Shafer ditch, while Hill & Reardon, who own the Thorn 
Creek Ditch, are atill at work on their diggings. On west 
eide of More Creek the Buena Vista Company having 
still a good supply of water in the Alderson ditch, are 
actively carrying on their extensive mining operations 
on several claims, and Mr. Frank Headen, who procures 
water from the same ditch, is, we believe, also still at 
work on his claims. Although we were not favored 
With as much snow during the past winter, as during 
previous winters, still, owing to tho cool weather dur- 
ing the Spring, we have had a better mining season 
than usual. But few claims have failed to pay, and as 
a general thing they have paid better than ever before. 
We have heard less grumbling and growling thanusu^l, 
and from all accounts our miners generally are well 
satisfied with their season's work. 



Montana. 



Mines at Butte. — JVeiu JVort/i West, July 5: Owing to 
variouB causes, not a great deal of work is just at pres- 
ent being done in the Butte Quartz Mines. Mr. Gil- 
christ some time since reached a depth off 105 ft. in his 
claim on the Parrott lead, the lead at that point having 
a 5 ft. crevice of ore, 17 inches of which is the noted 
rich copper and gold rock. At 90 ft, they struck water. 
The pay ore had pinched above this, and it was desirable 
to ascertain if it came in again wide below water level. 
So work was continued under many disadvantages, 15 
ft. deeper when the streak: had widened out again to 
paying extent and gave evidence of stillgreater width. 
As the expense of keeping out the water was heavy and 
the appliances inadequate, work was therefore sus- 
pended until such appliances could be placed on the 
mine. That it is a fortune to the owners, neither they 
nor miners who have examined it have any doubts. Mr. 
Gilchrist a few days since sold to Nelson Woverton, of 
Rocker, a Jfi interest in 400 ft, of the Parrott for $1,200. 

Mr. Gilchrist also perfected arrangements last week 
with Mr. W. A. Clark, of the First National, for the fur- 
ther development of the Gambetta lode, which has now 
a 60 ft. shaft in it, showing at that depth 2 ft. 9 in. of 
very rich red and black oxide copper ore. It is a more 
promising lead than the Parrott. Mr. Clark has now a 
force of men sinking the shaft 10 ft. deeper, and enlarg- 
ing it to working capacity, which will determine cer- 
tain negotiations of 1,000 ft. of it, and probably result 
in its continuous working. The ore in this 2 ft, 9 in, 
crevice is worth in San Francisco, for the copper alone, 
$250 per ton on average. It is designed to make quite a 
ahipment of ore from the lead the present season. 

Utah. 

Parley's Park Mine.— Salt Lake Tribunejnly 3:There 
are now about 1,000 men working and prospecting In 
that section of country. The Flagstaff Co. have com- 
menced work toward erecting their stamp mill, which 
will be in running order in abont four weeks. The 
principal mines are the Ontario, MoHenry, Walker, 
Webster, Pinyon, Pioneer and other claims. New dis- 
coveries are numerous and good, among them the Sunny 
Side stands prominent, at ttie depth of 55 ft. it having 
developed a vein four feet in thickness of milling ore, 
while the Silver Cloud has a similar vein of smeltine 
ore. ° 

Blue Jacket Mine— Same, 8th. inst. : A Bingham 
correspondent says he visited this mine last week, and 
found everythiug in a first rate and promising condition 
The shaft was down some 43 ft., and has a drift 40 ft. to 
the north. The ore taken out assayB from $60 to $125 
per ton, of which there are about 100 tons now lying on 
the dump, and 150 tons more in sight in the shaft. The 
foot wall is smooth and well-defined, and there is every 
indication that the Blue Jacket will become one of the 
permanent mines ot the district. 

The Miller Mine.— From a private letter we learn 
that the Miller Mining Co., in American Fork Canon, 
has struck a new body of gray carbonate ore, large 
quantities of which are taken out daily. The writer 
says that all surrounding mines will yield more ore 
this season than ever before. 

Binghams'b Prospects.— Salt Lake Journal, July 7 : 
Our correspondent, writing from Bingham Canon 
under date of July 5, says that the prospects of Bing- 
ham are most flattering. The mines in this camp will 
soon be opened sufficiently to allow of more ore 
bein^ Bhipped than from all the other camps of Utah 
combiued. That they they have the capacity we can 
not doubt. 

Giant Mines— A four-foot vein of splendid looking 
carbonate ore has been struck in the Little Giant mine. 
Adjoining this mine iB the Big Giant mine, both of 
which are owned by Messrs. Ferguson and Fuller, and 
both give promise of proving a windfall to the owners. 
Work will be pushed ahead on these mines, and to-day 
a sufficient number of men will be procured to run them 
day and night. 



Time Tests the Merits of all Things. 

1840 For Over 30 Years, 1873 

PERRY DAVIS' 
PAIN-KILLER 

Has been tested in every variety of ciimate, and by 
almost every nation known to Americans. It is the 
constant companion and inestimable friend of the mis- 
sionary and the traveler, on the sea or land, and no one 
should travel on our Lakes or Rivers witfiout il. 

Since the PAIN-KILLER was first introduced, and 
met with such extensive sale, many Liniments, Reliefs, 
Panaceas, and other Remedies have been offered to the 
public, but not one of them has attained the truly 
enviable standing of the PAIN-KILLER. 

■WHY IS THIS SOP 

It is because DAVIS' PAIN-KILLER is what it claims 
to be, a Reliever of Pain. 

Its Merits are Unsurpassed. 

If you are suffering from Internal Pain, Twenty to 
Thirty Drops in a Little Water will almost instantly 
oure you. There is nothing to equal it for 

Colic, Cramps, Spasms, Heart-burn, Diarrhea, 

Dysentery, Flux, Wind In the Bowels, Sour 

Stomach, Dyspepsia, Sick Heart 

ache, <fec, «fec. 

In sections of the country where 

Fever and Ague 

Prevails, there is no remedy held in greater esteem. 
Persons traveling should keep it by them. A few drops, 
in water, will prevent sickness or bowel troubles from 
change of water. 

From foreign countries the calls for PAIN-KILLER 
are great. It Is found to 

Coke Cholera when all other Remedies Fail. 

WHEN "USED EXTERNALLY, AS A LINIMENT, 
nothing gives quicker ease in Burns, Cuts, Bruises, 
Sprains, Stings from Insects, and Scalds. It removes 
the fire, and the wound heals like ordinary sores. 
Those suffering with RHEUMATISM, GOUT, or NEU- 
RALGIA, if not a positive cure, they find the Pain- 
Killer gives them relief when no other remedy will. 

It Gives Instant Relief from Aching Teeth.. 

Every House-Keeper should keep it at hand, and 
apply it on the first attack of any Pain. It will give 
satisfactory relief, and save hours of suffering. 

Do not trifle with yourselves by testing untried reme- 
dies. Be sure you call for and get the genuine PAIN- 
KILLER, as many worthless nostrums are attempted to 
be sold on the great reputation of this valuable medi- 
cine. 8S7~ Directions accompany each bottle. 

Price — 25 cts., 50 cts., and $1 per bottle. 



No Life Insurance Company has a better record or more 
permanently popular reputation than the Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. J. B, Roberts, 315 California 
Street, San Francisco, is general agent for this Coast. 
Send to him for circulars and inlormation of this reliable, 
first-class company. 



Continental Life Insubancb Co., No. 302 
Montgomery street, corner of Pino. 



Mining and Other Oomuanies. 



Owing to the time necessary to mail the present large edition of the 
M. (J* S. Press, we are obliged to go to press on Thursday even- 
ing— wJiicIt is the very latest hour we can receive adiertisements. 



Angels Quartz Mining Company— Princi- 
pal place of business, 408 California street, San 
Francisco. Location of works: Angels Mining Dis- 
trict, Calaveras County, California. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 35), 
levied March 4th, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

T D Mathewson 3 300 $450 Oo 

TDMathewson 4 314 47100 

TDMathewson 5 600 750 00 

TDMathewson 17 26 39 00 

T D Mathewson (not issued) 325 5-7 488 57 

J H Fish (not issued) 342 6-7 574 29 

J H Fish, Trustee 20 50 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 21 60 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 22 60 75 00 

J H Fish, Trustee 23 50 75 00 

Mrs EBFish 9 1000 1600 00 

RM Anthony 18 100 150 00 

R M Anthony. . . (not issued) 45 6-7 68 57 

RM Anthony 19 60 90 00 

E H Sawyer 11 800 1200 00 

E H Sawyer (not issued) 228 4-7 342 86 

Geo. Osgood 12 400 600 00 

Geo. Osgood .... (not issued) 114 2-7 171 43 

And in accordance with law and an order made by 
the Board of Directors, on the 4th day of March, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
Maurice Dore & Co., 327 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., on Monday, April 21st, 1873, at 2 o'clock 
p. m., of such day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of Bale. GEORGE OONGDON, Secretary. 

Office, Room No. 1,408 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California (up stairs). a5-3t 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale is hereby postponed for thirty days, at 
the same hour and place. 

apl9 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale is hereby postponed until "Wednesday. 
June 18, 1873, at the same hour and place. 

ml7 GEORGE CONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale is hereby postponed until Wednesday, July 
16, 1813, at tiie same hour and place. 

J14 GEORGE OONGDON, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— Angels Quartz Mining Company. 
The above sale is hereby postponed until Wednesday, 
August 13, 1873, at the same hour and place. 

jy!9 GEORG E CONGDON, Secretary. 

Stanislaus Water Company of California — 

Principal place of business, 526 Kearnv street, San Fran- 
cisco. Location of works, near La Grange, Stanislaus 
County. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors held on the 2d day of July, 187a, an assessment 
(No. 2.) of two cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, 526 Kearny st. Any stock 
upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 10th 
day of August, 1873, will be delinquent, and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment is made before 
will be sold on Tuesday, the 26th day of August, 1873, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 
^ w ™ -u- CLINTON O. TRIPP, Secretary. 

Office, No., KB Kearny street, Rooms 1 and 2, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal, - jy 5 



Beckwith Mining Company— Location of 

works, Ely Mining District, Lincoln county. State of 

Nevada. Principal place of business. San Francisco, Cal. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 7th day of July, 1873, an assessment 
of fifteen (151 cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, rooms 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Col. Any stock upon which thiB assessment shall 
remain unpaid on Monday, the 11th day of August, 1873, 
will be deemed delinquent and advertised for sale at pub- 
lic auction, and unless payment is made before, will 
be sold on Tuesday, the 2d day of September, 1873, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Directors WM. H. "WATSON, Secretory. 

Office, Rooms 5 and 6, No, 302 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. jyS-td 



Bunker Hill Quartz Mining Company— Lo- 
cation of works: Amador, Amador County, California. 
Principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock on account of assessment, {No. 10} levied 
June 6th, 1873, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders as followB: 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Wales L Palmer 113 20 $200 00 

Wales L Palmer 120 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 121 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 122 20 200 Oo 

Wales L Palmer 124 20 200 00 

Wales L Palmer 125 2Q 200 00 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made June 5th, 1873, so many shares of each 
parcel of said stock as maybe necessary will be sold at 
public auction, at the office of the company, No. 19 First 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on Monday, July 28th, 1873, 
at 12 o'clock noon of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

WALES L. PALMER, Secretary. 
Office— No, 19 First St., San Francisco, Cal. jy!9 



The California Beet Sugar Co. — Loca- 
tion of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of Works: Alvarado, Alameda 
County, California. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 26th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 
Name. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

W.T.Garratt 2 126 $1250 

W.T.Garratt 40 63 630 

Ephxaim Dyer 6 63 630 

Ephraim Dyer 39 62 620 

H. G>. Rollins 9 63 630 

H.G.Rollins 35 25 250 

H. G.Rollins 36 12 120 

Wm.B.Carr , 23 250 2500 

Wm.B. Carr 62 38 380 

E.H.Dyer 27 5 60 

E, H. Dyer 71 245 2450 

Austin D. Moore 60 60 600 

T. G.Phelps 68 63 630 

And in accordance with law and an order of the 
Board of Directors made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each pareel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the company, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on Tuesday the 22d day of July, 1873, at 12 
o'clock noon of said day, to pay said delinquent assess 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

LOUIS FRANCONI, Secretary. 
Office, No. 314 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The Central Land Company— Location of 

office and principal place of business, No. 338 Mont- 
gomery street, Room 5, San Francisco, California. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of Assessment levied on the 
ninth day of June, 1873, the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the repective shareholders as fol- 
lows. 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

PL Weaver {Executor, 37 160 $187 60 

Edward McLean, and FWarner.36 100 125 00 

FBHaswell 35 100 125 00 

F B Haswell 34 HO 125 00 

F B Haswell 33 100 125 00 

FBHaswell 30 50 62 50 

FBHaswell : 29 60 62 60 

Edward McLean 12 60 62 60 

Edward McLean 11 50 62 60 

Edward McLean 10 60 62 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 9th day of June, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, by the Secre- 
tary, at the said Room 6, 838 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California, on the 28th day of July, 1878, at 
the hour of 2 o'clock p. m. of said day, to pay said 
delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

F. B. HASWELL, Secretary. 
Office, No. S38 California street, Room 5, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. jyl2 



Commercial Coal Mining Company of San 

Francisco. Principal place of business, City and County 

of,San Franciseo, State of California. Location of works, 

Santa Cruz County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the 9th day of July, 1873, an assessment 
of Fifty Cents per Bhare was levied upon ttie capital stock 
of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United States 
gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, at No. -J02 Montg im- 
ery Street, room 23. Any stock upon which this assess- 
ment shall remain unpaid on the ltitb day of August, 1S73, 
wiilbe delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on Mon- 
day the 8t.h day of September, 1873, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex 
penses of sale. 

S. B. HANSON, Secretary. 

Office, No. if-2 Montgomery street, room No. 23, Man 
Francisco. jy 12 



Dutch Flat Blue Gravel Mining Company. 

Place of business, San Francisco, Cal. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 

described stock, on account of assessment (No. 2) levied 

on the 13th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount 

Booth, LA 13 2000 51000 

Booth, LA 14 1000 SCO 

Booth, LA 15 1000 500 

Cope, G W, Trustee 67 100 50 

Cope, GW, Trustee 68 100 60 

Cope, G W, Trustee 69 100 60 

Cope, G W, Trustee 70 100 50 

Dorsey.EB ,.37 500 250 

Dorsey, E B 42 200 100 

Dorsey.EB 43 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 44 100 50 

Dorsey, EB 45 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 46 100 50 

Dorsey.EB 47 100 60 

Fry.JD 17 500 250 

Forbes, Alex, Trustee 62 2000 1000 

Gashwiler, J W 36 800 400 

Heydenfeldt, 8 16 2000 1000 

Haggin.JB 6 1000 500 

HagRin.JB 6 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 18 500 250 

Roberts, GD 20 1000 500 

Roberts, G D 21 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 22 1000 500 

Roberts, GD 25 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 26 1000 600 

Roberts, GD 27 1000 500 



Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares, Amount. 

Roberts, GD, ....28 1000 500 

Roberts, GD*--- 29 1000 500 

Raymond, W H 3 1000 500 

Raymond, W H 4 1000 600 

Richardson , E A, Trustee.32 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.33 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.34 1000 500 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.35 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.49 500 250 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. 50 200 100 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.51 100 60 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. 54 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.55 1000 600 

Richardson, E A, Trustee.56 1000 500 

Taylor.HW CO 180 90 

Taylor, HW 61 20 10 

Taylor, H W 64 600 250' 

Whitcomb, CA 68 100 60' 

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the 13th day of May, 3873, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock aB may be 
neceBsary will be sold at the office of the company,, 
room 11, 401 California street, San Francisco, Cal , on 
Monday, the 14th day of July, 1873, at the hour of 12: 
o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. W. M. HELMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 401 California street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. jn28 

POSTPONEMENT.— The above sale is hereby post- 
poned to Saturday, the 29th day of July, 1873, at the 
same hour and place. W. M. HELMAN, Secretary. 
. jyl5-td 



Equitable Tunnel and Mining Company, 

Location of works. Little Cottonwood District. Utah Ter- 
ritory. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the fifth day of May, 1873, an assess- 
ment (No. 2) of ten cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 36 New Merchants' Exchange 
Any slock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the tenth day of June, 1873, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on the thirtieth day of June, 
1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Direc- 
tors^ __ _ CHARLES S. HEALY, Secretary. 



POSTPONE MENT. -The day for deeming stock delin 
qucnt on the above assessment Is hereby postponed unti 
"Wednesday, July 2d, 1873, and the sale thereof until Tues- 
day, the 22d day of July, 1873. By order of the Board of 
Directors. OH AS. S. HEALY, Secretary. 

POSTPONEMENT.— The day for deeming atock delin- 
quent on the above assessment is hereby postponed until 
Thursday, July 17, 1873, and the sale therof until Friday 
August 8tb, 1873. By order of the Board of Directors 

CHAS. S. HEALY. Secretary. 



Frear Stone Company of California—Lo- 
cation of works and principal place of business, City 
and County of San Francisco, State of Oaliforna. 
Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment, No. 6, levied 
on the 27th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares, Amount. 

Booth, Lucius A 11 405 $810 

Booth, Lucius A 12 46 90 

Coleman, John W 54 400 800 

Cornell, ME 110 20 40 

Dam, G W 99 10 20 

Dam, G W 107 6 10 

Emery, J S 84 460 900 

Spaulding, N W 15 405 810 

Spaulding, N W 16 45 90 

Spaulding, N W 19 405 810 

Spaulding, N W 20 45 90 

Syer, Robert 95 60 100 

Tripp.E 41 8 16 

Wegener, R, Trustee 65 5 10 

Wegener, R, Trustee. ....... 72 11 22 

Wegener, R, TruBtee 73 34 68 

Wegener, R, Trustee 76 60 100 

Wegener, R, Trustee 90 260 600 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 27th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said Stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
he C ompany, No. 414 California street, San Francisco. 
California, on Monday the 21st day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of one o'clock P. M., of said day, to pay said de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 
Office, 414 California street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 



Office of the Frear Stone Company of 

California. San Francisco, July 15, 1873. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Frear 
Stone Company of California will be held at their office, 
No. 414 California street, San Francisco. California, on 
E riday. the 1st day of August. 1873. at 1 o'clock P. m. 

jyl6-td R. WEGENER, Secretary. 

Globe Mining Company — Location of 

works, Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, held on the vd day of July, 1873, an assessment 
(No.3) of seventy-five cents per share was levied npon the 
capital stoek of the Corporation, payable immediately, in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, Room No. 26 Hayward'a Building, No. 419 
California Btreet, San Francisco, Oal. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain nnpaid on the 4th day 
of August, 1873, will be delinquent and advertised for *a\e 
at public auotion, and, unless payment is made before, will 
be sold on the 26th day of August, 1873, to pay the delin- 
quent asse-sment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Directors. 

JOSEPH MAGUIRE, Secrerary. 

Office, Room 26, Hayward's Building, No. 419 California 
street, Kan Francisco, Cal. jy5 

Hasloe Mill and Mining Company — Prin- 
cipal place of business, No. 408 California street, San 
Francisco. Location of works: MaiipoBa County, 
California. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon the foUowing de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied 
on the 14th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

GBDieferrari 3 10 $5 00 

WmD Higgins 74 50 26 00 

TVJulian 71 10 5 CO 

Wm H F Minnie 25 60 25 00 

Margaret Ragsdale 44 60 hnl 1 „ 7 „ 

Margaret Ragsdale 45 25 Dai J 2l °° 

OlxvingSmith 52 10 5 00 

C Irving Smith 53' 11 5 00 

C H Roberts ...57 26 12 60 

C H Roberts 68 26 12 50 

G W Woods 47 20 . 10 00 

WH Thomas 10 6 00 

W H Thomas 24 15 7 60 

And in accordance with law, and on order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 14th day of May, 1873, so 
many shares of each parcel of such atock as may be 
necessary, wiilbe sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No. 408 California Btreet, San Francisco, 
California, on Monday, the 21st day of July, 1878, at 
the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., of said day, to pay said de- 
linquent assessment thereon, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. TRIPP, Secretary. 
Office — 408 Calfornia street, up stairs, San Francisco 
California. jy.6 



July ig, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



45 



Great Blue Gravel Range Mining Com- 

Sany. Location of works, Placer Comity, State of 
aliforaia. Location of principal place of buaioeaa. 

Ban Francisco, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described Btock, on account of assessment (No. 9] lev- 
led on tLe 12tb day of June, 187a. the several amounts 
set opposite tbo usmes of the respective share- 
holders, as follows : 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Babcoi.JT 1*5 U t- M 

Babcoi.JT 148 3» 2 BO 

flabcoi, J T MO ffl 3 50 

Babcoi.JT J7II 100 10 00 

Babcoi.JT T.-< 10O 1000 

Babcoi.JT S5o 60 5 00 

Babcoi.JT, Trustee... ... M 100 10 00 

Babcoi, J T. Trustee 110 300 90 00 

Bal» 01. J T. Trustee 117 100 10 00 

Bsbcoi, J T, Trusleo 11» lot) 10 00 

Ualllle, Marnsrot 15 50 

Berry. Mn. Julia A l'J «0 4 00 

Dowdy. Mrs Sarah 8 838 30 3 00 

BversTWm S>8 80 3 00 

Oarlleld, Carrie 31M 5 50 

Il..ro. Mrs Eliza 384 185 la 50 

Hunt. E F. Truatee 114 35 -• o 

Josselyn. L SI 332 87 6 70 

Kann'paul 367 733 73 30 

Larue, James B8 600 MOO 

Lame, James 339 1000 100 uu 

Morlen, H F 60 100 10 00 

Morken. H F 106 100 10 00 

Murphv, M A MS 30 li CHI 

Murphy.MA 323 loo 10 00 

Murphy. Mrs M A 1" 85 8 50 

Mills, Mrs PhcebeS 36s 35 -1 .si 

Peck.ES 300 1420 142 00 

Peck, E 8 364 420 42 00 

Plmnmer, M D 208 125 12 50 

Plummer.MD 377 2000 200 00 

Plumiuer, MD 318 3000 300 00 

Peck.ET 47 200 20 00 

Hose. MsryE 162 20 3 00 

Beed.SM I 100 I" no 

Heed, 8 M 383 100 10 00 

Bnell, Oeo P 184 60 6 00 

Thompson, E F 399 100 1 1 

Thompson, E F 400 20 .'en 

Thompson, E F 401 30 3 00 

Thompnon, EF 402 50 5 00 

Thompson. EF lew 16 160 

Wilson, JohnB 16 160 

Yeomanns, AB 318 60 5 TO 

Yromanns, A B 319 60 5 00 

And In accordance with law. and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 12th day of June, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stocli ccs limy bo 
necessary, will bo sold at public auction, at the ofneo 
of the Company, Room 6 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. California, on Tuesday, the fith 
dayuf August, 1873, at the hour of 2 o'clock, p. M., of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, 
together with costB of advertising and expenses of 
the sale. WM. H. WATSON. Bccretory. 

Office, Boom 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. Jyl6.td 



Greenhorn Gold Mining Company. — Lo- 

catiOll of principal place of business, Sail 1'raiiclsco, 

California. Location of works, tiroes Valley Mining Dis- 
l fcricl, Nevada County, California. 

Notice Is hereby Riven, lhat at a moot Inn of the Hoard of 
Directum, held on the N tli duy ofJuly t )6,3. an a-at-siitem 
of one ilollur and fifty cents per whurv was levied upon the 
capital stuck of tbo Corponitiun, payable immediately, in 
Bolted States nold coin, to the Secretary, No 138 Cal- 
ifornia street. Sun Francisco, California, 

Any stock upon which this asBes-mtni shall remain un- 
paid on the lBtb day of August, 1873, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for saloai public auction, and. uiileSBony- 
mont is made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 10th 
day of September, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
loRother with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
.JOEL F. LIGHTNER. Secretary. 

Office, No. -138 California street, San Francisco Califor- 
nia. jyl'-Md 

Heckerdorn Gold and Silver Mining Com- 
pany. Principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of works, Blue Mountain Dis- 
trict, Calaveras County, Cal. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 

described stock, on account of assessment levied on the 

Uth day of June, 1873, the several amounts set opposite 

the cameB of the respective shareholders, as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Louis Belff 174 400 $100 00 

FrankLyon 156 40 10 00 

Isidore Lyon 108 20 6 00 

Berson 161 100 25 00 

Monin 167 100 25 00 

A Mayer 101 100 25 00 

Hanson 119 60 15 00 

Sawyeur 03, 107,156, 840 210 00 

Louis Ny 167 400 100 00 

Louis Ny 168 400 100 00 

LouiuNy 201 800 200 00 

Louis Ny 207 400 100 00 

LouisNy 208 200 50 00 

Louis Ny 209 1C0 25 00 

Saintat 169 20 6 00 

Salntat 94 20 5 00 

Saintat 95 20 6 00 

Saintat 96 20 5 00 

Saintat 97 20 5 00 

Cutorlno Ny 136 100 26 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 9th day of Juno, 
1873, so many Bharea of each parcel of said stock as may 
bo necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the office 
of the Secretary, No. 734 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California, on the 28th day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock m. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of Bale. 

LOUIS TERME, Secretary, 
Office, 734 Montgomery street, San Francisco Cali- 
fornia. Jyl2 



Manhattan Marble Company of Califor- 

ilia— Principal place of bu»incM, San Franciaco. Loca- 
tion of work*, Oakland, Cat 

_v, i'.- Id aeratn | n a 'hat at a medina of tho Board 
of Xhrceton, held on tha 2Sd day of Jnna, WIS, an iwrti 

■■■I- doli.ir i • r *haro win levied upon the capital 
■took of the corporation, payable. tinii<vdiatcly in United 
BtatH K<>ld coin, to the Secretary, at the office Ol 
panv, sly Pine itrw '. Ban Froncuvoo. 

Anv stock ui'on which this uavumi'Dt aboil remain un- 
paid on ih* Sub day ot July. 1873. will be delinquent, and 
adrertiaed tor >a)e at public auction, and uoleas payment 
la made before, will be told on Monday, the Utb day of 
Aufiu»t, 1S7), to pay the delinquent aRrootineiit, together 
wuh coau of advertising and cipenaes of nl«, 

1). M. BOKEi:, .-ccreury. 
Office, 319 Pine St., S. F.. Cal. 



Orient Silver Mining Company- Location 

of principal ploceol bunion**. Han Francisco, California. 

Location of norks, Ely Mi in in; Di-irtct, Lincoln County, 

Nevada. 

Noli cu Is hereby (trail, that at a meeting of the Direct- 
or*, held on the HOi da> of June, 1S.3, an ivoaiiirnt . Nc 
t) of Ten Coins per share waa levied upon the cupltul •took 
of the Corporation, payaMe ImmedUtely, in t'nitcd States 

Kild coin, to the Secretary, at the oltlce of the Company, 
oomNo."26, Hayward'a Building, No. ilnCalil rum street. 

Laoo, California. 
Any Stock upon winch thi* »-s- unit nt aliall ri.-iii.iiu un- 
paid ou the 19th day of July, 1B73. will be delinquent, and 
advertised for -ale at public auction, and unless payment 
la made before, will be sold on Monday, tho Utb day of 
August, 1*73, to pay 'ho delinquent assessment, together 
with cost* of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
<if the Board of Director*. 

JOSEPH MAGUIRE. Secretary. 
Office. Room No. 26, II ay-ward's Building, No. llDOaU- 
fornla street. San Francieco. California. jlti 



Phenix Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of business, No. S5 New Merchants' 
Ex change. Sin Franc i.>c", California. Location of 
work*, Alt* City, Little Cottonwood District, Ctah Terri- 
tory. 

Notice is hereby given lhat at a meeting of the Board of 
Directors, hold on the 2d day of Julv, 1873, an assessment 
often cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately in 1'oiied States 
gold an' silver coin, to the Secretary, No 35 New Mer- 
chants' Exchnnge, San Francisco, Calitornla. 

Any rttif.-k upun which thit iiam'.t»meut shall remain un- 
paid ou the Bin day of August, 1873, will ^delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unle** payment 
is made betore, will be sold on Monday, the 25th day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
wilt costs ot advertising' und expentc s of sale. 

CBUB. S. HEALY, Secretary. 
Oftlee, No. J'i New Merchants' Exchange. jy3-d&B 



Placer Gold Mining and Canal Company. 

Locution of principal place of business, San Frunaisco. 

California. Location of works, Fl:icor County, State of 

California. 

Notice is hereby given, thatat u meetlngof tho Directors 
of -.aide -ui pany, held on tho eighth l8lh) dny of July, A, o. 
187:1, an assessment of ten (10) cen s per share was levied 
■upon the c:iplial stuck of the corporation, piiyuble Immedi- 
ately, In United BtatCSRold coin, to the Secretory, at the 
office of the Company, No. 411 California street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 

f aid on Monday, the eleventh (Utb ) day of August, A. D. 
873, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public 
auction, and, unless payment, it made before, will bo sold 
on Saturday, the thirtieth (.lOthj day of August, a. d. 1873, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

GEu. W. R. KING, Secretary. 
Office-Ill Calif, rnia street, San Francisco, California. 
jyl9 



Rising Star Mining Company.— Location of 

principal nlacc of business, San Francisco, California. 

Location of works. Nevada County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Directors, 
held on the lltli day of July, 1873, an assessment (No. 6) of 
six cents per share wa* levied upon the capital stock of 
the Corpoiation, payable immediately in United States 
*old and silver coin, m the Secretary, at the office of the 
C. mpany, room 37 New Merchants Exchange, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon whioh this assessment shall remain 
nnpald on the 13th d:iy ot August, 1873, will be delin- 
quent and advertised lor sale at public auction, and, 
unless payment is made betore, will be sold on the 30th 
day of August, 1873, to liny the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board ol Directors. 

J. M. BUFf'INGTON, Secretary. 

Office, Room 37 New Merchants' Exchange, California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. jyl2-td 



Lady Esten Tunnel and Mining Company. 

Principal place of business, No. 35 New Merchants' Ex- 
change, San Francisco, California. Location of works. 
Little Cottonwood District, Utah Territory. 
Notice is hereby given, thatat a meetlngof the Board of 
Directors, held on the 11th day of June. 1873, an assessment 
(No. 3) ot live cents per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, No. 35 New Merchants' 
Exchange. Sau b raucisco, Ual. Any stpek upon which this 
assessment shall remain unpaid on the 17th day of July, 
1S73, will be delinquent, and advertised ior sale at public 
auction, and unless paymont is made betore, will he sold 
on Wednesday, the 6tli day of August, 1873, to pay tho de- 
linquent assessment, together with costs ot" advertising and 
expenses of sale- OHAS. S. HEALY, Secretary. 

Office, 35 New Merchants' Exchange, California street, 
Sail Francisco, California. jU 



Lady Franklin Gold and Silver Mining Co. 

Principal place of business, City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. Location of works, Silver 
Mountain Mining District, Alpine County, California. 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Bourd of 
Directors, held on tho 1st day of July, 1873, an assessment 
of fifty cents nei share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable Immediately, in United States gold 
and stiver coin, to the Secretary, at his office, 507 Montgom- 
ery street, San Fran Isco, Culitornia. 

Anv stock upon which this as^esrtraent shall remain un- 
paid on the 15th day of August, 1873. will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on Monday, the 15th day of Sep- 
tember, 1873. to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

J. S. LUTY, Secretary. 
Office— 507 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 
j.v!9 



Regent Consolidated Mining Company- 
Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, 
California. Location of works, Little Cottonwood 
District, Salt Lake County, Utah Territory. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the followingde- 
scribed Stock, on account of assessment (No. 1) levied on 
the 26th day of May, 1873, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. ShareB. Amount. 

Allen, James M 46 10 $1 00 

Allen, James M 48 10 100 

Allen, JameBM 50 10 100 

Allen, JameBM 61 10 100 

Allen, James M. 53 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 54 10 100 

Allen, JameBM 55 25 2 50 

Allen, JamesM 66 25 2 50 

Allen, JamesM 67 25 2 50 

Allen, James M 68 25 2 50 

Allen, JamesM 59 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 60 60 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 61 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 62 60 5 00 

Allen, JameBM 65 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 67 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 68 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 69 1000 100 00 

Allen, JamesM 73 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 74 60 5 00 

Allen, James M 75 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 77 50 5 00 

Allen, JamesM 170 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 172 250 25 00 

Allen, JamesM 182 250 25 00 

Allen, JamesM 183 250 25 00 

Allen, James M 185 250 25 00 

Allen, JamesM 187 260 25 00 

Allen, JamesM 190 250 25 00 

Allen, JamesM 212 10 1 00 

Allen, JamesM 213 10 100 

Allen, James M 214 10 1 00 

Allen, JamesM 216 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 217 10 1 00 

Allen, JamesM 219 10 1 00 

Allen, JamesM 220 10 1 00 

Allen, James M 222 100 10 q0 

Allen, James M 223 100 10 00 

Allen, James M 224 100 10 00 

Allen, JameBM 2^6 100 10 00 

Allen, JamesM 226 100 10 00 

Allen, JamesM 227 100 10 00 

Allen, JameB M 229 100 10 00 

Allen, JamesM 230 100 10 00 

Allen.JamesM 235 20 2 00 

Allen, JamesM 236 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 237 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 238 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 239 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 240 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 241 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 242 20 2 00 



Names. No. Certificate. No. Snare l. Amount. 

Allen, James M 2U 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 'j|| 20 2 00 

Allen.JamesM 345 30 3 00 

Allen, .1 nines M 246 30 300 

Allen, James M J47 20 2 00 

Alku, James M 248 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 250 20 2 00 

Allen, James M v.'.l 20 2 00 

Allen, James M 352 60 6 00 

Allen, James M 253 60 6 00 

Allen, James M 264 60 5 00 

Allen, Jamrs M 255 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 256 SO 6 00 

Allen, James M 267 60 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 258 50 6 00 

Allen, James M 60 5 00 

Allen, James M 50 5 00 

Allen, James M 24] 50 5 00 

Allen.JamesM 369 60 5 00 

Bessie, MD 264 60 5 00 

Chase, Dudley 322 250 26 00 

Fortune, Hw, 160 15 00 

Gates, Mrs L 265 60 6 00 

Gates, George 266 25 2 50 

Gates, George B67 25 2 60 

Gates, George 268 26 2 60 

Gates, George 269 25 2 60 

Gates, George 270 25 2 50 

Gates, George 271 26 2 60 

Hinckley, George E 154 50 6 00 

Hinckley, George E 155 60 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 156 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 157 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 165 50 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 167 60 5 00 

Hinckley, Georgo E 321 100 10 00 

Hinckley, George E 323 60 5 00 

Hinckley, George E 324 60 6 00 

Hinckley, George K 325 50 5 00 

Higgins.WW 162 50 5 00 

HlgginB.WW 272 35 2 50 

Higglns, WW 273 25 2 50 

Higgins.WW 27i 25 2 60 

Higgins.WW 275 25 2 50 

Hig«ins,WW 276 50 5 00 

Higgins.WW 277 50 5 00 

Higgins.WW 278 60 6 00 

Higglns, WW 279 50 6 00 

Higgins.WW .282 50 6 00 

Higgins.WW 283 60 5 00 

High, W H 326 100 10 00 

Shannon, Luke 307 50 5 00 

Shannon, Mrs C A 308 40 4 00 

Thompson, KM 306 10 100 

Verdon.T J, Trustee 127 60 5 00 

Verdon.T J, Trustee 128 50 5 00 

Verdon , T J , TruBteo 129 60 5 00 

Verdon, T J, Trustee 130 50 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 310 50 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 311 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 314 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 316 100 10 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 319 50 5 00 

Wallace, J A, Trustee 320 50 5 CO 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 26th day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of such stock as maybe 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, at tho office 
of the Company, No. 438 California street, San Francis- 
co, Cal., on Tuesday, the 22d day of July, 1873, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock, m., of Baid day, to pay delin- 
quent aBse&Bment thereon, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

WM. L. USTICK, Secretary. 

Office, 438 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Jyfi 

State of Maine Mill and Mining Company 

— Principal places of business, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Location of works: Amador County, California. 
Notice. — There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of aBBessment(No. 3) levied 
on the 23d day of May, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amounts. 

Job M Allen, Trustee, 77 200 $10 00 

Jas M Allen, Trustee 78 100 5 00 

JasM Allen, Trustee 79 100 5 00 

J M Bufnngton 20 1000 50 00 

J M Bumngton 6 600 30 00 

JMBuffington 85 66 3 30 

JM Bufflngton, TniBtee,.. . 84 260 13 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 41 1000 60 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 49 20 100 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 50 20 1 00 

Piatt Burr, Trustee, 51 20 1 00 

Piatt Burr, TruBtee, 66 50 2 50 

Piatt Burr, Trustee 57 50 2 60 

ChaB Borthwick 72 50 2 50 

H B Congdon 35 20 100 

H B Congdon, Trustee 36 100 5 00 

HBCongdon 37 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee 38 100 5 00 

HB Congdon, Trustee 39 100 5 00 

H B Congdon, Trustee, 40 600 25 00 

HB Congdon, Trustee 73 50 2 50 

HB Congdon, Trustee 74 60 2 50 

H B Congdon, Trustees 75 50 2 50 

OPDudley 76 600 25 00 

John Fay 2 1000 50 00 

John Fay 14 3000 160 00 

WmFaulkner 22 500 25 00 

Mrs M G Faulkner 10 100 5 00 

Mrs M G Faulkner 11 100 5 00 

V H Higgins 4 1000 50 00 

JasLKing 83 400 20 00 

SLMarks 12 240 12 00 

S L Marks 21 500 25 00 

A C Morse, Trustee, 42 500 25 00 

A C Morse, Trustee, 43 500 25 00 

A C Morse, TruBtee, 44 100 5 00 

A C Morse, Trustee 45 100 6 00 

A O MorBe, Trustee, 46 100 6 00 

A C MorBe, Trustee 48 100 5 00 

Mrs. F. E. Morse 80 100 5 00 

H. H. Beach 3 1000 50 00 

H.H.Beach 18 1000 50 00 

Mrs. Ella Beach 23 400 20 00 

ChaB. B. Tiiley 1 1634 81 70 

W.J. Tiiley 61 1000 60 00 

L.N. Tower 28 100 5 00 

J.H.Whitman 5 1000 50 00 

J.H.Whitman 15 2600 130 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23d day of May, 1873, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Secretary, 30G Montgomery 6treet, San Francisco, 
California, on the 2l6t day of July, 1873, at the hour of 
12 o'clock M ., of said day, to pay the said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. H. B. CONGDON, Sec. 

Office, 306 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Spring Mountain Tunnel Company — Prin- 
cipal place of business, No. 37 New Merchants' Ex 
change, California street, San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works, Ely Mining District, Lincoln County. Nevada 
Notice ia hereby (,'ivcn, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Directors, held ou the 20th day ofdunc, 1873, an assess- 
ment (No. 6) of twenty cQiits per share was levied upon 
the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately 
in United States cold and silver coin, to the Secretary, 37 
New Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco, Oal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the 29th day of July, 1873. will be delinquent, and 
adverti ed for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Monday, the 18tfi day of 
August, 1873, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
witti coats of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Directors. J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 

office— 37 New Merchants' Exchange. California street, 
San Francisco. Oal. jn28 



The Sanderson Gold Mining Company — 

Location of works. Railroad Flat, Calaveras County, 

California. 

Notioa i> haraby ..'i.'cn, thatat a nicctinc of the BoarJ of 
Directors of said Oompuy, bold on the 20th day of Jun«, 
|8(t, an ji-si snuiKui i, No. 5) of flf teen (15) oolite [>or share 
was levied uo <n tlo' >.. u ital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able i uiin t-d i. ■Li. i> in United Statu sold ami silver coin, t" 
the Secretary ol sold Company, at his office. In Sau Fran- 
cisco. 

Any stock uvon which raid ti!>su»<un«D( shall remain on- 
p.tid en tlu- tSlli day of July, 1673. will be delinquent, and 
advertised for sale at public auction, ai.d union pujmeiit 
shall bo modi- he ore, will be B - Id od slondaj, the JUi dav 
ot AuKUst. H*73. fi pay the d. limiuent a--i umiv Dt theroou, 
ta ol advertising and BxpcnsM i.f sale. 
By order of Lhu Board of Directors. 

WILLIAM STfAHT. Secretary. 

Office. US Leidesdorff street. Sun KraiuLMn.cU 

Starr King Silver Mining Company— Lo- 
cation of prin ipal placo of tmalnfiSB, San Francisco, 
California. LootUoo of works, Spruce Mountain 
Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 
Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following 
described stock, on account of assessment (No. 3) levied 
on the tenth day of June, 1873, the several amounts set 
Opposite the names of the respective shareholders as 
follows: 
Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Booth, L A, Trustee 5 600 $250 00 

Bush, Hyinan P, Trustee... 82 loOO 500 00 

Bush, Hyinun P, Trustee.. .152 flu 25 00 

Bush, Hyman P, Trustee. . .154 50 25 00 

Cornell, R H, Trustee 9 I'd' 83 00 

Cornell, It H, Trustee 180 lOU 50 00 

Cornell, It H, Trustee 181 Hi 42 00 

Drinkhousc, J A, Trustee.. 61 10O 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. 62 100 GO on 

Drink house, J A, Trustee.. 68 100 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. 69 bin 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. 70 ECO 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee. . 71 100 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. 72 100 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, TruBtee.. 73 100 50 00 

rrlnkhouss, J A, Trustee... 89 lw 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee. .. 101 lot) 60 00 

Drinkhouse, .1 A, Trustee.. .103 100 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee... 1W 1O0 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. .1115 100 50 00 

Drinkhouse, J A, Trustee.. .186 25 12 50 

Driukhousc, J A, Trustee.. .137 26 12 60 

Friedlander, I, Trustee 124 500 2i0 00 

Johnson, HP 206 173 86 60 

Kaplan, Louis. Trustee 8 12fi 62 50 

Kozminsky, H, Trustee 157 400 200 00 

Moore, W H, Trustee 20 500 250 CO 

Nicol, Wm. TruBtee 191 50 25 00 

Nicol, Wm, Trustee 195 100 50 00 

Nicol, Wm, Trustcee 196 100 50 00 

Itichardsou, E A, Trustee. .106 250 125 00 

Sutliff, H, Trustee 42 100 60 00 

Sutlifl", H, Trustee 49 60 25 00 

Sutliff, H, Trubtee 57 60 25 00 

Schmitt, M, Trustee 107 250 126 00 

Sharp, Wm H, Trustee 165 500 250 00 

Trask.A V, Trustee, 18 250 125 00 

Trask, A Y, Trustee 19 62 3100 

Weeden.JH 36 150 75 00 

Whillatch, J W, Trustee.. ..197 100 50 00 

Wnitlatch, J W, Trustee.. ..198 100 50 00 

Whitlatch, J W, Trustee.. . .199 100 50 00 

Whitlatch, J W, Trustee.... 200 100 50 Ou 

Watson, Wm R, TruBtee 171 1875 937 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made ou the tenth day of Juno, 187a, bo 
many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be ne- 
cessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of 
the Company, rooniB 26 and 27, Merchants' Exchange, 
California street, San FranciEco, Cal., on Monday the 
fourth day of August, 1873 at the hour of 12 o'clock, M., 
of such day, to pay delinquent assessments thereon, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses of the 
sale. LOUIS KAPLsN, Secretary. 

Office, Rooms 26 and 27 Merchants' Exchange, Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. jyl5 

Yule Gravel Mining Company—Location 

of workB: Viola Claims. Township No. 8, Placer 

County, California. 

Notioe. — There iB delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment, (No. 3) levied 
on tho 4th day of June, 1873, the several amounts set 
opposite tho names of the respective shareholders, as 
follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Baker, Henry 353 20 $4 00 

Bryant, A J 379 5 1 00 

Cutter, S L 317 10 2 00 

Conners, John 420 70 14 00 

Dore.Benj, Trustee 95 50 10 00 

Dore.Benj, Trustee 110 100 20 00 

D ore, Benj, Trustee 114 60 10 00 

Dore, Benj.TruBtee 116 50 10 00 

Core, Benj, Trustee 117 50 10 00 

Dore, Benj , Trustee 237 100 20 00 

Gummer, WP 304 10 2 00 

Hynemann, S, Trustee 382 20 4 00 

Higgins and Green, Trustees.377 10 2 00 

Higgins, W L, Trustee 398 20 4 00 

Hill, John, Trustee 428 200 40 00 

Hull, G W 400 100 20 00 

Middleton, S P 433 100 20 00 

Mclnerney, M J 400 156 31 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee. . . .333 50 10 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee 390 10 2 00 

Richardson, E A, Trustee 401 30 6 00 

Romer, J L, & Co., Trustees.. 342 40 8 00 

Romer, J L, & Co., Trustees. .376 40 8 00 

Schmidell, H, Trustee 307 25 5 00 

Schmidell, H, Trustee 387 10 2 00 

Sears, Wm H 319 25 5 00 

Voight, DrC 386 40 8 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 163 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 106 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee ....172 50 10 00 

WfllBon. Wm H, Trustee 182 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 183 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 189 100 20 00 

WatBon.Wm H, Trustee 196 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 199 50 10 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 250 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 257 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 258 100 20 00 

Watson, Wm H, Trustee 260 100 20 00 

Lowenberg, S, Trustee 437 50 10 00 

Lowenberg, S, Trustee 438 60 10 00 

Logan and Edelen, Trustee. . .399 20 4 00 

And in accordance with law, and aa order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 4th day of June, 1873, 
so many shareB of each parcel of said stock as may 
be necessary, will be sold at public auction, at the 
office of the company, room 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, California, on Tuesday, the 29th 
day of July, 1873, at the hour of 2 o'clock, p. m., of 6aid 
day, to pay said delinquent asseBBment thereon, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

W. H. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 5 and 6, No. 302 Montgomery St., San 
FranciBco, Cal. jy!2 



THE NEW U. S. MINING- LAWS. 
The new Laws of 1872, governing the location and 
purchase of Placer and Quartz Mines and Agricultural 
LandB in Mining Districts of the U. S., printed in cir- 
cular sheet, for Bale at this office. Single copieB, 25 eti » 
UBual discount to tho trade. 

THE NEW COAL I.AXD T.A.W AM» BEG U- 

LATIONS THEKKIMH-It. 

A pamphlet under the above heading, containing the full 
text 01 the "Coal Land Bill," published and tor sale at 
this office. Price 10 cts. 



46 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, 1873. 



Machine Builders. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

First and Fremont streets, 

SAN FBANOISOO 

IJU P. BANKIN, A.F.BBiTTO», 

GEO. \V. FOGG, Superintendent. 

^toaiu Engines and Boilers, 

HAKINE AND STATIONAEY, 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS 
Mining Machinery of Every Description, 

And all other olasaes of work generally done at first. 
class establishments, manufactured by us at the lowest 
prices, and of the best quality. 

1&~ Particular attention paid to Jobbing Work and 

N > " r Lsole Agents for sale of HUNTOON'S OELE- 
BKATED PATENT QOYEBNOB. 

18v20-3m SODDAKD & 00. 



FULTOM 

Foundry and Iron Wor&s, 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MAHUFA0TOHEI13 Of 

r JC 15 A. BX ENGINE®, 
Quartz, Flour and. ©aw MjUIjs* 

ayea' Improved Steam Pump, Brodle'i Im- 
proved Crasher, Alining Fampi, 
Amalgamatori, and all kind* 

of Mucbliicrr. 

N. E. corner of Tehama and Fremont streets, above How- 
street, San Francisco. 3-qy 



THE RISDON 

Iron and Locomotive Works. 



INCORPORATED APRIL 30, 

CAPITAL , $1,000,000. 



LOCATION OF WORKS: 
Corner of Beale and. Howard Streets* 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturers of Steam Engines, Quartz and Floor 
Wi ll Machinery, Steam Boilers (Marine, Locomotive 
and Stationary) , Marine Engines (High and Low Pres- 
sure) . All kinds of light and heavy Castings at lowest 
prices. Cams and Tappets, with chilled faces, guaran- 
teed 40 per cent, more durable than ordinary iron. 

Directors : 

0. J. Brenham, 0. E. MoLane, 

Wm. H. Taylor, Lloyd Tevis, 

James D. Walker. 



Joseph Moore, 
Wm. Harris, 



WM. H. TAYLOR President 

JOSEPH MOORE.. Vice-President and Superintendent 

LEWIS B. MEAD Secretary 

34vl7-ay 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sucramciito. 
BOOT, NEILSON & CO., 

HAND TACT DEE ES OF 

8TEAM ENGINES, BOILERS, 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER AND SEDIMENT 
COLLECTOR 

Dunbar' s Patent Self-Adjusting- Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders. 

And all kinds of Mining Machinery. 

Front Street, between ST and O streets, 

Saobamemto Orrr. 

Rolling Mill Company, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AMD — 

Every Variety of ^li«iltiugr, 

Embracing ALL SIZES f 

St -uinboiit Shafts. Cranks, Piston and Con> 

nectlnK Bods, Car and Iiocomotrve Axles 

and Frames 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED IRON 

Of every description and size. 

oe^ Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL 
COMPANY, P. O. box 2032, San Francisco, Cal., will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

OSf Cue highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 



Miners' Foundry and Machine Works, 

CO-OPERATIVE, 

First Street, bet. Howard and Folsom, SanFranomoo 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds. 



HYDRAULIC CHIEF. 



FISHER'S 
KNUCKLE 

JOINT 

AND 

NOZZLE 



Cheapest and Best 

Hydraulic Machine 

in use. 




MACHINES 

Manufactured 

TO 0EDEE, 

to throw from 

One 

to an 

eight-inch 

8TREA M. 



The only reliable party in the Hydraulic business who protects his patrons. 
9v23-tf Address V. H. FISHER, Nevada, Cal. 



HYDRAULIC MINERS, TAKE NOTICE— I hereby caution Miners and Manufacturers against making, buy- 
ing, selling or using a Hydraulic Machine or Joint known as the Little G-iant, manufactured and sold by R. R. & 
J. Craig and Richard HosMn, as the same is an infringement upon the invention of the machine known as FISH- 
ER'S HYDRAULIC CHIEF, secured by Letters Patent, No. 110,222, dated Dec. 20, 1870. All parties participating 
in such infringements will be rigorously prosecuted. Nevada, Jan. 13th. F. H. FISHER. 



THE LIGHTNING MILL. 




THE 

LIGHTNING MILL 

For Pulverizing Quartz, 

" Charleston Rock," and all Native Phosphates, 
Flint, Feldspar, Iron Ore, Manganese, Antimony, 
Carbon, Corundum, Old Crucibles, Barytes, Brim- 
stone, Slate, Soapstone, Graphite, Glass, Marble, 
Plaster, Anthracite and Bituminous Coals, eto. 



WM. STEWART'S 



Patent Bone Mills and 



Crushers. 



"WALKER BROS.?<&5CO. 
Celebrated Patent Bone Mills and C: 
Duval's Patent Centrifugal Pumps. 



For Grinding Bones, Rock, Quartz, and all hard 
substances; also. Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Coffee, 
Spices, etc. 

Streets, Philadelphia, Sole Manufacturers of Stewart's 
Straub & Co.'s Patent Revolution French Burr Mill and A. 



MINING 



CAMERON'S 



STEAM PUMPS 



DAVID STODDART, 



114 Beale Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ASBESTOS ROOFING. 
Over 15,000,000 Square Feet in Use. 

THE ASBESTOS ROOFING IS A SUBSTANTIAL AND RELIABLE MATERIAL, 
- Which can be Safely Used in Place of Tin, Slate, etc., 

ON STEEP OB PLAT HOOFS, IN ALL CLIMATES. 

It can toe Cheaply Transported and Easily Applied. 

THE PACIFIC . COAST TRADE SUPPLIED BY 

FERINE & EDWARDS, 

No. 638 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
2vfi-bp4te 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 
EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

12S and 131 Beale street, between Mission and Howard, 
San Francisco. 

USHT ASTD HEAVY CASTINGS, 

of every description, manufactured. 24vl6qr 



THEODORE KALLENBESa, 
MACHINIST, 

and Maker of Models for Inventors. All kinds of Dies 

Stamps and Punches made. Also, all kinds of 

Small Gears Cut. 

Repairing done on very Reasonable Terms and in the 

best manner. No. 32 Fremont street, S. F. 19v23-3m 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

Me. 125 First street, opposite Minna., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

All sums of Brass, Compositlon.Zinc, and Babbitt Meta 
Castings, Brass Ship Work of all kinds. Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steamboat Bells and 
Gongs of superior tone. All kindsof Cocks and Valves, Hy 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
M- PRICES MODERATE. •*»* 
J. H. WEED. V. KINGW-ELL. 



C W. MOTJMHROP & CO., 

Draug;htsmen, 

Plans, Specifications, and, Estimates for 
Machinery of all Kinds. 

We also design machines to meet particular demands 
and secure ana assign the patents on the same. 

No. 237 First street, San Francisco. apl9-3m 



OEO. W. PRESCOTT. 



O. W. SCHE1DEL. 



W. E. ECKABI 



PRESCOTT, SCHEIDELL & CO., 
MARYSVILLE FOUNDRY. 

Core Br of B and Fourth streets, Marysville, Cal. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

STEAM ENGIINES, 

STATIONARY AND PORTABLE 

SAW AND GRIST MILLS, 

Hydraulic Machinery , 

Quartz Crushing and Amalgamating 

Machinery 

Of every description, constantly on hand. 



Plans and estimates furnished upon application. 
Repairs upon all kinds of Machinery promptly made, 
,Dd at moderate charges. 

Having unrivalled facilities, we are prepared to make 
to order, at short notice, anything required in our line. 

Specimens of our work may be seen in all the mining 
regionB on this coast. 



A. HANKE'S 
iraorsr FOUNDRY, 

CONNER MAIN AND HARRISON STREETS, 
Entrance on Main Street San Francisco. 

Every Description of Ornamental Work, 

Stove and French Range Work, grate and fender work, 

small machines of all descriptions, house 

work, etc., promptly attended to. 

25v26-3m 

OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY, 

137 and 139 FirBt street SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEIGER & BOLAND, 
IRON FOUNDERS. 

IRON CASTINGS of aU descriptions at short notice. 

Sole manufacturers of the Hepburn Rolling 1 Pan 
and Callahan Grate Bars, suitable for Burning 
Screenings. 

Notioe.— Particular attention paid to making Supe- 
rior ShoeB and Dies. 20v26.3m 



N. Seibert 5 Eureka Lubricators. 




THE HIGHEST PREMIUM 

Awarded hy the Mechanics' Institute Fair, San Fran- 
cisco, and State Fair, Sacramento, 1871. 

These Lubricators are acknowledged by all engineers 
to be superior to any they have ever used; feed con- 
stantly by pressure of condensed water, supplied by 
pipe A, regulated under the oil by valve J, and forced 
out through check valve and pipe B into the steam pipe 
O; it then becomes greasy steam, passes to all the 
valves and cylinder at every stroke of the engine; glass 
tube I indicates amount used per hour. Packing on 
rods and stems lasts longer, and the ringB on the piston 
will not corrode. One pint of oil will last from three 
to six days, according to speed and size of engine; T, 
Bliding gauge; E, valve to shut off when engine stopps; 
H, F, valves to shut- off in case of frost; steam doeB not 
enter the cup; it is always cool; warranted to give satis- 
faction. Patented February 14, 1871. Manufactured by 
California Brass Works, 125 First street, S. F. 24v23tf 




PRICE, S50. 



The New Wilson 

SEWING MACHINE 

Has points of superiority over 
all others. A reliable warran- 
ty is given with each machine 
for 

FTVE YEARS. 
It is unequaled for light and 
heavy work. Examine and 
compare it with the highest 
priced machine in the market 
G. A. NORTON, Gen. Ag't 
for the Pacific Coast. 

337 Kearny St., S. F 
12v27eow-bp-ly 



BUY BARBER'S BIT BRACK. 



July ig, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



47 



Second-Hand Engines and Boilers 
For 8ale by McAFEE, SPIEKS & 0O-, 

Bolter Makers, etc, 309 to 315 Howard St. 

IVHobse Poweb PotrTABLE TiiRKJSKina Engine — 
Nearly new invl.- by Wood k Maun. Cylinder buhsi 
dumrtT, 14-inch strike. Boiler large End w. 11 
proportioned, has all the mounting*, U mounted on 
wheels. In flrst-rste condition, and will be told cheap. 
This is the very thing for opening e new or working e 
■mall mine. Price, $1,350. 

30-Uohee Puweu Locomotive ob Fibk Box Boileb— 
made of the beet C. H. No. 1 American iron, 5-16 inch 
thnk. PomEce 4 feet long, shell 43 Inches dUiaeU-r. 
contain* 46 tube* 3xU inches, with grate barn, breech* 
lng End smoke stack, all In good condition. Price, $750. 

Three 35-Hobsk Poweb Boilers, each 50 Inoaefl di- 
ameter, 16 feet lung. conUlning 42 tubes 3H Inches 
diameter. The«e boilers have been entirely rebuilt, slid 
are in thoroughly good eondlttOtt. Will bo sold to- 
gether, or separately, at a low price. 

15-Hobae Powbji Uoiljlu— :fJ inches diameter, 12 feel 
long, containing 'Si tubes 2Vj Inches diameter, with 
steam drum, furnace front, grates and all fittings. 
Plica. $300. 

Build Ell kinds of Boilers, Water Pipe, Pump Column, 
Bucket*, Tanks, etc. Jyl'J-lm 



CROCKER'S PATENT 

TRIP HAMMER QUARTZ BATTERY. 




Th« inventor havinfj perfected and tented the durability 
and capacity of tbe*e Batteries to bin entire natinfauiixn. In 
now reddy to maoufaolur* and guiiritnttp them. Parties 
in want of a Battery cannot rind tin ir e<|Ual in regard to 
PR I UK, WEIGHT. CAPACITY. POWER TO RUN THEM. 

State and County Rights for Salo by 

Q. D. CROCKER, 
17v26-tf 315 California street. San Francisco. 



To Capitalists and Hydraulic Miners. 
PATENT SELF-CLEANING SLUICE. 



This new and useful Invention Is designed to collect 
all tho gold eb fast as it in set free from the dissolving 
earth, and conduct It Into b receptacle of mercury or 
safety pocket, under lock and key, from whence it may 
be removed in a few momenta, without either checking 
the flow of water or Interfering in the least with the 
waahing. 

The invention, if properly placed In our rivers, will 
also collect the gold which is yearly traveling down 
their channels, thus affording an annual income with a 
trifling oxpense for attending. 

For further particulars address 

DR. J. B. BEERS. 
2v27tf 230 Kearny street, Ban Francisco. 



Friers Patent Paragon VaporStove. 

PATENT GRANTED. 

The Great Labor Saver of the Household. 

Economy, Convenience and Safety. Combined. 

JC8T THINK OF IT— 

No Wood, no Coal, no Coal 
Gas, no Stove Pipe, no 
Chimney, no Smoke, no 
Ashes, no Dirt, no Wood 
Boxes, no Coal Scuttles, 
no Kindling Wood, but a 
Friction Match, and tho 

Fire in Full Blast in 

Half a Minute! 
OVEN HOT IN TWO 
MINUTES. 
Steak broiled in seven 
minutes! Baked Beans in 
thirty minutes! The fire 
extinguished In a moment 
And the house unhealed ! 
It has no rival in all 
kinds of Cooking and Flat 
Iron Heating, and com- 
bines Economy, Conven- 
ience, Neatness, Safety 
and Durability! The La- 
dies welcome it; a little 
Child can operate it, and 
All Recommend It. 
Prices from $5 to $25, according to size. Manufac- 
tured and sold by WM. FRIELj, 

69 and 71 Fourth street, San Francisco. 
N. B. — Agents wanted in every town in the State. On 
payment of ■?">. one Stove will be sent as sample. 
22v25-2amly 




HHEET IROIV PIPE. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 

Corner Howard and Beale Streets, 

Are prepared to make SHEET IKON AND ASPHALTUM 
PIPE, of any size and for any pressure, and contract to 
lay the same where wanted, guaranteeing a perfect 
working pipe with the least amount of material. 

Standard sizes of railroad Car Wheels, with special 
patterns for Mining Cars. These small wheels are made 
of the best Cor Wheel Iron, properly chilled, and can be 
fitted up with the improved axle and box— introduced by 
this company, and guaranteed to outlast any other 
wheelB mode in this State. 

1ST All kinds of Machinery mode and repaired. 

34v22-3m JOSEPH MOOBE, Superintendent. 



Insurance Oompanv, 

OF HARTFORD. 



Assets, .... $3,5000,000 

Surplus, Over - 5,000,000 

Eato of Expense to Receipts, 7. 53. 



DIVIDENDS PAID ANNUALLY, 

odi luenoing on Life Policies, with from 20 to 25 per cent, the First Year, 25 to 30 

the Second, and increasing every year, thereby reducing the cost 

of Insuranoe with the age of the Policy. 



In Life Insurance, select an OLD COMPANY WITH EXPERIENCE, and having a 

LARGE SURPLUS. 

Remember that Large Dividends, and Consequently 

CHEAP INSURANCE, 

AKE SEOOBED ONLY BY 



Economical Management, 



High Rates of Interest, 



and Favorable Mortality. 



In all these vital points, look carefully into the Btanding of all Life Insurance 
Companies, and the 

Connecticut Mutual 

W1I.I. BE FOUND IN THE FRONT BANK. 

JAMES B. ROBERTS 315 California Street, 

General Agent for the Pacific Coast. 

20v25-eom ep 



San Francisco Boiler Works, 

123 and 125 Beale Street SAN FBAN CISCO 

F. I. CURRY, 

(Late Foreman of the Vulcan Iron Works,) Proprietor. 




INVENTION. 



High and Low Pressure Boilers of all 
Descriptions. 

SOLE MA.NOTAOTUEEKS OF THE CELEBRATED 
SPIRAL BOILEB. 

SHEET IRON "WORK of every description done 
at the Shortest Notice. 

All kinds of JOBBING and REPAIRING promptly 
attended to. 17v25-3m 



McAFEE, SPIERS & CO., 

iJ OILER MA-KERSS 

AND GENERAL. MACHINISTS, 

Howard St., between Fremont and Beale, San Francisco. 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS. 




SAW FRANCISCO 

SCREW BOLT WORKS, 

PHELPS BROTHERS, Proprietors 

M.VNUFACTUluam OF ALL KINDS OF 

Machine Bolts, Bridge Bolts, and Ship oi 
Band Bolts. 

13, 15 and 17 Drumm Street, San Francisco. 4v341y 



PtmceASEBS please say advertised in Scientific Press. 



CALIFORNIA 



< 

hi 
hi 
< 


For Sewing Machines, Dentists' and 
Jewelers' Lathes. 

This Invention can be applied to the operating of all 
kindB of Sewing Machines, 'Dentists' and Jewelers' 
Lathee. Its simplicity is only equaled by its durability; 
it avoids the use of the treadle, which is ungraceful and 
injurious. 

Application made by the Agents for the Pacific OoaBt. 

SAWYER & WHEDON, 

lv6eowbp 633 Washington Street San Francisco. 




NELSON <fc DOBLE, 



AGENTS FOB 



Thomas Firth & Sons' Cast Steel. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hlednen, Hn mmen, Stone 

Cutter*', Hlacksmltha' 

and Horse-Shoera* 

Tooli. 



G. A JI. BABNETT, 

Manufacturers of Files of every Description, 

Nob. 39, 41 and 43 Richmond street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



MILL SAW FILES A SPECIALTY. 
16v25-ly 



Britton. Holbrook & Co., Importers of 

Stoveaand Metale. Tinners' Goods, Tnola and Machines; 
HI and 11- California St., 17 and 19 Jjavia St., San Fran- 
cisco, aDd 178 J St., Sacramento. a»r.-ly 



Steam Boiler Manufactory 

— OF— 

JAMES H. SHANLEY, Successor to D. McDonald, 

Oregon Btreet, below Front, San FranciBCO. 

All Sorts of Steam. Boilers Hade to Order 
and Re paired. 
Also, all kinds of Sheet Iron Work done promptly, 
and at prices to Buit the times. 1 vj7 



Metallurgy and Ores. 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO.. 

COMMISSION MEROH-AJVTW, 

ADVANCES HAVE 
Wti Mil kinds of Urea, und particular ntlenllOB 

PAID TO 

CONHieKMKNTM OF GOOM. 

*vlfl Jm 



«. W. BTBOHO. W. L. BTBONO . 

C. W. STRONG Sl CO., 
Metallurgical Works, 

Mo. 10 Stevenson Street, uear First, San Fraxoiboo 

We purchase Ores, Bullion, etc. OreB workedrand 
Tests made with care. Also, Assays of Gold, Silver, 
Copper, Lead, Tin and other Metuls. 23v*2'2tf 

LEOPOLD KUH, 

(Formerly of the U. 8. Branch Mint, fi. F.) 

Aj9*»*tiyei" mid Metallurfgieci.? 

CHEMIST, 

No. Ol 1 Commercial Street* 

(Opposite thoU.S. Branch Mint. 

Sam Francisco, Oal. 7v21-3m 



C. W. White, 
47 Clay Street. 

JOS. THORNKLLL, 
Bricklayer and Contractor 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

Chemical Apparatus and Chemicals, 

Druggists' Glassware and Sundries, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS, ETC., 
S12 >nd 514 Washington Btreet, SAN FRANOI800 

We would call the special attention of Assayers 
Ohemists, Mining Companies, Milling Companion 
Prospectors, etc., to our large and well adapted stock o 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS 

—AND— 

Chemical Apparatus, 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies sines 
the nrBt discovery oi mines on the Pacific Coast. 

»y Our Gold and Silver Tables, Bhowing the value 
per ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and val- 
uable tables for computation of assays in Grains 
Grammes, will be sent free upon application. 

7v25-tf JOHN TAYLOR & 00. 



Important to Miners and Mill Men. 

Silver-Plated Oopper Amalgamating Plates, 
for Saving Gold. 

I Of all sizes and in any quantity, furnished to 
order. Full instructions sent for operating. 
Particular attention given to plating goods for 

BuilderB, Plumbers, etc. Hotel and Restaurant 

workreplated. 

San Fbancisco Gold and Silveb Plattng Woekb, 

655 Mission street, San Francisco. 

2v25-3m E. Gh DENNISTON, Proprietor. 



Varney's Patent Amalgamator. 

These Machines Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapidity pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort haB been, or will be spared 
to have them constructed in the most perfect manner 
and of the great number now in operation, not one has 
ever required repairs. The constant and increasing de- 
mand for them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam dlreotly 
into the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows-. 

The pan being filled, the motion of tho muller forces 
the pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through 
the apperture and between the grinding surfaces. — 
Thence it is thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. 
The curved plates again draw it to the center, where it 
passes down, and to the circumference as before. Thus 
it is constantly passing a regular flow between the grind- 
ing surfaces and into the quicksilver, until the ore is 
reduced to an impalpable powder, and the metal amal- 
gamated. 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others 
They bring the pulp bo constantly and perfectly in con- 
tact with quicksilver, that the particles are" rapidly and 
completely absorbed. 

Mill-men are invited to examine these pans and Betters 
for themselves, at the office, 229 Fremont Street, 

San Francisc* 



Nevada Metallurgical Works. 

RI0TTE & LUCKHARDT, 

Consulting: Mining- Engineers and Metal- 
lurgists, No. 21 First St., S. F. 

WORKING T RST MADE BY ANY PROCESS 
-TESTING OF PROCESSES. 

PJouw furnished for the moBt suitable ProcetiS for Ores. 

Assaying la all ltn Braachei. 

Analysis of Ores, Minerals, Waters and all other sub- 
stances. 

t9 r Special attention paid to the mining and metal- 
lurgy of Quicksilver. 26vll-6m 

PLATINUM 

Vessels, Apparatus, Sheet, Wire, Etc., Etc. 

For all Laboratory and Manufacturing Purposes 
H. M RATNOR, 
25 Bond street, New York. 
PUtinum Scrap and Ore purchased. . 



48 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



[July 19, 1873. 



New Incorporations 

California Type Foundry, July 12. Object, to man- 
ufacture and sell printing type, printing preBses, and 
printing material and implements connected with the 
business of printing. Trustees-C. H. Dewey, C. H. 
Parker, J. Hutchinson, A. Cooper and F, H. McConnell. 
Capital stock, $100,000, in shares of $100 each. 

California College of Dental Surgery, July 12. Ob- 
ject, to instruct in the theory and practice of Dental 
Surgery, and to confer the degree of D. D. S. on such 
persons as may be found qualified. Directors — J. A. 
W. Lundberg, E. T. Bunnell, J. J. Birge, R. Cutler, 
James L. Cogswell, Louis Bush and Max Sichel. > 
The following named company has filed its certificate 
of incorporation in the Secretary of State's office, 
Sacramento. 

Washington Mining and Transportation Co., July 
15. — Objects: Mining and doing a general transportation 
business in the State of California, Oregon and in 
Washington Territory, and for constructing a railroad 
(an electro-magnetic telegraph line in connection there- 
with) , running from a point at or nearTenino to Budd's 
Inlet, at or near Oylmpia, in "Washington Territory, of 
the length of twenty miles. The principal place of 
business is to be in San Francisco. Directors: John B. 
Felton, Theodore Le Boy, Henry Barroilhet, John N. 
Goodwin, Anson Goldsmith, J. M. Johnson and Edward 
S. Salomon. Capital stock $1,000,000. The amount of 
capital stock actually subscribed is $500,000, which the 
certificate states has been subscribed by the Directors. 



GIANT POWDER. 

Patented May 86, 1868. 

THE ONLY SAFE BLASTING POWDER IN USE. 

GIA.NT POWDEK, IVO. X, 

For hard and wet Rock, Iron, Copper, etc., and Submarine Blasting. 

GIAISTT I»OWX>ER,, ISTO- S 9 

For medium and seamy Bock, Lime, Marble, Sulphur, Coal, Pipe Clay and Gravel Bank Blasting, Wood, etc. 
Its EXCLUSIVE use saves from 30 to 60 per cent, in expenses, besides doing the work in half the time 
required for black powder. 

S&- The only Blasting Powder used in Europe and the EaBtern States. 



20v22-3inl6p 



BANDMAN1T, NIELSEN & CO., 

General Agents, No. 210 Front Street. 



Meetings and Elections. 

Central Railroad Co. Directors: Beuben Morton, 
A.. W. Bowman, Horace Davis, A. J. Gunnison, Charles 
Main, George H. Howard, A. J. Pope, Michael Reese and 
William Scholle. The Directors have chosen the fol- 
lowing officers: President, Beuben Morton; Vice-Presi- 
dent, A. W. Bowman; Treasurer, A. J. Gunnison; Secre- 
tary, N. D.Arnot Jr. 

Ovebman M. Co., July 10. Trustees: George W. Bea- 
ver, (President), M. L. McDonald, B. F. Morrow 
Joseph Clark and O. H. Bogart. W. W. Stetson was re- 
elected Secretary. No dividends were paid during the 
year, though there were two or three assessments col- 
lected. 

CALiFOitNiA Acclimatizing Society. — July 14. Trus- 
tees— W. A. Newell, M. D.; W. W. Taylor, Eureka Con- 
solidated Mining Company; John F. Lohse, California 
Powder Works; C. R. Merrill, of J. C. Merrill & Co.; A. 
Gibbon, of J. C. Merrill & Co.; A. E. Swain; C. G. To- 
land, M. D.; P. McGovern; A. McKenzie; F. A. Walton. 
California Insurance Company; Chas. Kohler, of Kohler 
& Frohling; Franklin Lawton, Secretary San Francisco 
Board of BrokerB. 

Chollab-Potosi M. Co. — July 14. Trustees— A. X, P. 
Harmon, J. D. Fry, Alpheus Bull, William Norris, H. 

C. Kibbe, James Freeborn and James H. Dobinson, 
Secretary, W, E. Dean; Superintendent, Isaac L.Requia. 

St. Laweence M. & M. Co., Placer county, Cal., July 
14: Directors. — Francis Avery, (President); Charles 
Mayne, W. H. Foster Jr., W. H L. Barnes, and O. H. 
Bogart; Secretary, Richard B. Noyes; Superintendent, 
Charles Purdy. 

Savage M. Co., July 17,— Trustees: J. H. Pritchard, 
(President) ; J. H. Boalt, Robert Sherwood, J. D. Cough- 
Ian, and S. A. Raymond; Superintendent, A. C. Hamil- 
ton; Secretary, E. B. Holmes. 

Washington & Creole M. Co., July 16. — Trustees: G. 

D. Roberts, M. E. Kelly, T. Fords, T. R. Hayes and A. 
J. Bowie. 

Trench Gold Hnx M. Co., July 16.— Directors: H. 
H. Flagg. (President,) Geo.W. Beaver, James H. Dobin- 
son, W. W. Stetson and Edward F. Stone. Job. Marks 
was retained as Secretary. 



The Grass Valley Union says the Idaho Mining Co 
met on Monday evening and declared a dividend of 
$77,500—525 per share— proceeds of the June run. 



A Bich Quartz discovery has been made 
near San Andreas, Calaveras county. The 
ledge is one foot wide. 



San Francisco Metal Market. 

Wednesday, July lfi, 1873, 

Iron.— 

Scotch Pig Ixon.flton $55 00 

White Pig, ty ton 55 00 

Refined Bar, bad assortment, $ lb 

Refined Bar, good assortment, ^4 lb (S — QSi4 

Boiler, No. 1 to i — 05W@ — 06 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 — mW 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 07^L 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 —08 @ — 08M 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 —08 ^ 

Horse Shoes, per keg. 9 00 

Nail Rod 11 

Norway Iron 9 

Rolled Iron 6^ 

Other Irons for Blacksmiths, Miners, etc. 6}|@ 9# 

OOFPEB.— 

Braziers .. — 35 @ — 38 

Copper Tin'd — 50 5» 

O.Nlel'sPat -55 @ 

Sheathing, 3»Ih ^_ 25.W 

Sheathing, Yellow © — 25^2 

Sheathing, Old Yellow @ — 12 ~ 

Composition Nails — 25 

Composition Bolts — 25 

Tin Plates.— 

Plates, Charcoal, IX ^4 box 14 00 @ 14 50 

Plates, I O Charcoal 13 00 13 50 

Roofing Plates.. .j.... 13 00 13 50 

Banca Tin, Slabs, ^ lb — 40 — 42 W 

Steel.— English Oast, $0. — 20 — 25 

Drill 20 

FlatBar 22 

Plough Points lfi — 17 

Russia (for mould boards) 17 18 

Zinc 9J4 10 

Zinc, Sheet — 9 — 10 

Nails— Assorted sizes — 5j^@ — 9 

Leather Market Report. 

[Reported for the Press by Dolliver & Bro.] 

San Feancisco, July 16, 1873. 
Trade continues very quiet. Manufacturers only 
buying what they are compelled to. California and 
Eastern stocks are a shade lower under the continued 
pressure in the moneymarket. French stock continues 
firm at old prices. 

City Tanned Leather, "$ lb 26@29 

Santa Cruz Leather, & lb 26@29 

Country Leather, % ft 25@28 

Stockton Leather, % lb 26@29 

Jodot,8 Kil., perdoz $50 00@ 54 00 

Jodot, 11 to 19 Kil., perdoz 66 00@ 85 IW 

Jodot, second choice, 11 to 16 Kil. *$ doz 55 00@ 70 00 

Oornellian, 12 to 16 Ko 57 00® 67 00 

Cornellian Females, 12 to 13 60 00® 64 00 

Oornellian Females. 14 to 1G Kil 66 U0@ 72 00 

Beaumorvllle, 15 Kil 60 00® 

Simon, 18 Kil.,% doz 60 OOtfd 62 00 

Simon, 20 Kil. m doz 65 00® 67 OU 

Simon. 24 Kil. $ doz 72 00® 74 00 

Robert Calf, 7 and 9 Kil 35 00© 40 00 

French Kips, $ ft 1 00® 1 30 

Calif ornia Kip, » doz 50 00 to 60 00 

French. Sheep, all colors, ^ doz 8 00® 15 00 

EasternOalf for Backs, & ft 100® 125 

Sheep Roane for Topping, all colors, $ doz 9 00® 13 00 

Sheep Roans for Linings, TO doz 5 50® 10 50 

California Russett Sheep Linings 1 75® 4 50 

Best Jodot Calf Boot Legs, ^pair 5 00® 5 25 

Good French Calf Boot Legs, ^ pair 4 OJ® 4 75 

FrenohOalf Boot Legs, ^ pair i 00® 

Harness Leather, ^ ft 30® 37W 

Fair Bridle Leather, fi doz 48 00@ 72 00 

Skirting Leather, $ & 34® 37« 

Welt Leather, & doz 30 00® 50 00 

Burl Leather, $ f oot 20® 22 

Wax Side Leather, * foot 17® 19 

Eastern Wax Leather. 26 



C. I?. R. R. 



COMMENCING 



Sunday, June 29th, 1873, 
And until further notice, Trains and Boats will 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO. 



7 00 A - M - ( Dai, y>- Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
* ,vv land) for Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, and 
Portland, P., Colfax, Reno, Ogden and Omaha 



7 Ofl A. M. (Daily). Gal P. R. R. Steamer (fromBroad- 
i,\>\J way Wharf)— Connecting at Vallejo with Trains for 
Calistoga, Knight's Landingand Sacramento; making close 
connection at Napa with stages for Sonoma. 



■JO Afl M. (Sundays excepted). Stockton Steamer (from 
i£-.\j\j Broadway Wharf), touching at Vallejo, Benicia, 
and Landings on the San Joaquin river. 



O f|f| P.M. (Daily). San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
*■'' vv land), stopping at all way Stations. 



a no pM 

*■ u « Oakland) for Lathrop, 

Los Angeles, Stockton and Sacramento. 



(Sunday? excepted). Passenger Train (via 
Oakland) for Lathrop, Merced, Visalia, Tipton, and 



A O.O. * - 

Y.uu ( rom Broadway Whari) connecting at Vallejo with 
Trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing *nd Sacramento. 



A (\(\ P. M. (Sundays excepted). Sacramento Steamer 
t.UU (from Broadway Wharf), touching at Benicia, and 
Landings on the Sacramento river. 



(Daily). Overland Emigrant Train (via Oak- 
-Through Freight and Accommodation. 



OAKLAND BRANCH.— Leave San Francisco, 7 00, 
8 10, 9 2u, 10 10 and 11 20 a.m., 12 10, 150, 3 00.4 00, 515,630, 815 
9.20 and *11 30 p. m. (9 20, 11 20 and 3 00 to Oakland only). 

Leave Bbooklyn (for San Francisco), *5 30. 6 40, 7 50, 9 00 
and 11 00 a. m., 1 30, 2 40, 4 55, 6 10. 7 55 and 10 10 p. m. 

Leave Oakland, *5 40, 6 50, 8 00, 910, 10 00, and 1110 a. 
m., 1200, 1 40, 2 50, 3 50, 5 05, 6 20, 8.05 and 10 20 p. m. 

ALAMEDA BRANCH.— Leave San Francisco, 7 20, 9 00 
and U 15 a. m. , 1 30, 4 00, 5 30, and 7 Oo p. in. (7 20, 11 15 and 
5 30 to Fruit Vale only). 

Leave Haxwards (for San Francisco), *4 30, 7 00 andlO 45 
a. m„ and 3 30 p. m. 

Leave Fruit Vale, *5 25, 7 35, 9 00 and 1120 a. m„ 130 
4 05 and 5 30 p. m. * Except Sundays. 



Ashcroft's Patent Steam 
Gauges, 

(Original — with Bourdon Spring) . 

Steam Gauges, 
Vacuum Gauges, 
Registering Gauges, 
Test Gauges. 

Low |j Water Alarms, Gauge Cocks, Glass 
Water Gauges, Cylinder Cups, Self-Oilers, 
£ oiler Felting', Selden's, Tuck's, Hemp and 
Soapstone Packing, Stocks, Taps and Dies, 
Twist Drills, Drill, Lathe and Planer Chucks, 
Emery Wheels, Etc. 

Every description of Engineers' and Ma- 
ehinists' supplies, for sale by 

TREADWELL & CO., San Francisco. 

2v26tf 




?\%v BRYANT & I 

'BUSINESS 



:ald 1 S^ 



STRATTON 



2fr 
'SAN 



COL] 

POST, 
RRANCJSn nl 



"W. T. GARRATT & CO. 

CITY 

Brass and Bell Founder, 

Corner Natoma and Fremont Streets, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Brass, Ziuo and Anti-Friotion or Babbet Meta 

O A.STIIf G S, ■ 

Church and Steamboat Bells, 

TITERS AND ABO BELLS, SOKU8, 

FIRS ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT POMPS. 

Steam, Liquor, Soda, Oil, Water and Flange Codes, 
and Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. 
Hose and all other Joints, Spelter, Solder and Cop. 
per Bivets, etc. Gauge Cocks , Cylinder Cocks, Oil 
Globes, Steam "Whistles. HYDBA.ULIO PIPES AND 
NOZZLES for mining purposes. Iron Steam Pipe fur- 
nished with Fittings, etc. Coupling Joints of all sizes. 
Particular attention paid to Distillery Wort. Manufac. 
turer of " Garratt's Patent Improved Journal Metal." 

^"Highest Market Price paid for OLD BELLS, COP- 
PER and BKASS. 6-tf 

W. T. GAEBATI, JAMES HILLMAN, W. T. LITTLE. 

N. W. SPAULDING, 

Saw Smithing and Repairing 

ESTABLISHMENT. 

Nos. 17 and 19 Fremont Street, near Market. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen'l Pass'CT and Ticket Apt. 



A. N. IOWHE, 

Gen'l Snpt. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC R. R. 



STATIONS. 



San Francisco Lv 

San Mateo 

Belmont 

Redwood City.... 
Menlo "-"ark ..;... 

Santa Clara 

San Jose Arrives 

Gilroy Leaves 

Pajaro 

Castrovflle , 

Salinas Arrives 

Gilroy Leaves 

Hollister Arrives 



SMS 
10.00 
10.10 
10.21 
11.02 
11.10 
l.nn 
2.00 
'I Ah 
3.10 
1.30 



94 | 

... L p.m. 

On Saturdays this train leaves at 2.30 p. M. 



sJ.40 
5.41 
5.62 
6.02 

6.14 
6.51 
7.00 



a8.50 

7.47 
7.37 
7 . 2>' 
7 15 
fi.3S 
SO. 30 



p. m , 
5.25 
4.21 
4,10 
4.10 
3.47 
3.10 
3.00 
1.25 
11.59 
11.16 
10.45 
12.2') 
11.10 



Mails Arrive and Close in S. F. 



MAILS FOB 



["Sundays excepted.] 

Alameda * 

Antioch, Blaok Diamond, etc . .* { 
Benicia and Rio Vista (C P R R) .* 

Cloverdale and Coast Points " 

Eureka * 

Napa Route via Vallejo * 

Northern California, Oregon and 

"Washington Territory 

Oakland j 



Sacramento via "Vallejo j 

San Rafael * 

San Jose 

Southern California and Arizona* 

Stockton via"W. P. R. R 

Vallejo and Benicia 

Visalia. Kern andTulare County.* 
Gi eat Britain, Monday and Thurs. 



10.30 

12.00 
12.10 



9.00 

12.00 
9.00 



The object of this school is to impart a thorough edu- 
cation in business affairs. It is open to persons of both 
sexes and of all ages. There is an English Department 
for those- not sufficiently advanced for the Business 
Course. SeBsionB continue day and evening throughout 
the year. Students can enter at any time. All wishing 
to be successful should secure a practical education at 
this College. Send for " Heald's College Journal," and 
learn full particulars. Sent free to alj by addressing 
E, P. HEALD, Pres. Business College, San Francisco, 
Cal. 2v27-ly 



MAGAZINES. 



Harper's 

Atlantic 

Godoy 

New York Ledger.. 



Blackwood. 

Hours at Home 

Good Words 

Peterson s 

Arthur 

Lady s Friend.. i 

Harper's Weekly.... 

Chimney Corner 

Literary Album. . . . , . 

London Society 

All the Year Round. 
London 111. News. .. 



P. An 



W. E. LOOMIS, 

Nctvs Dealer 

AND STATIONER, 
E. corner of Sansome and 
Washington streets, 

SUPPLIES AT.T , 

Eastern Perodicals, 

BY THE 

Tear, Month, or Number, 



a 

at 
O 



Ul 





MANTTFAOTUBEB OP 

!SI>A.TTlL,OIlVGr'N 

Patent Tooth Circular Saws. 

They have proved to be the most du able and economi- 
cal Saws in the Woi^d. 

Each Saw is Warranted in every respect, 

Particular attention paid to construction of 

Portable & Stationary Saw Mills. 

MILLS FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE 
At the lowest Market Prices. 



9.00 
9.00 
1.00 
9.00 
12.30 
12.40 
8.40 

'fi'OLI 
6.00 
9.00 
9.00 



Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Letter Express. 



LETTER EXPRESS FOK 



Antioch and Black Diamond 

Benicia, Martinez and Pacheco 

Oolinsville, Rio Vista and points on Sac. river. 
Gilroy and points south 

Oakland \ 

Oakland, San Jose and intermediate points. . . 

Petaluma and Sonoma 

Sacramento, Siocltton. Northern Cal. and Or 
Suisun, Knight's L'dg and points on Cal PRR 

San Jose 



San Jose, Saturdays 

San Rafael and San Ouentin . . 



Vallejo, Sacramento and Napa, Cal. P. R. R. . 



2.40 
3.50 
2.i0 
2.20 
3.50 
3.50 
3.00 
4 00 
2.10 
A in, 
12.30 
3.30 
3.50 



A Good Binder for $1.50. 

Subscribers for this journal can obtain our Paten 
Elastic Newspaper File Holder and Binder for $1.50— 
containing gilt title of the paper on the cover. It pre- 
serves the papers completely and in such shape that 
they may be quickly fastened and retained in book form 
at the end of the volume, and the binder (which is very 
durable) used continuously for subsequent volumes. 
Post paid, 25 cts. extra. It can be used for Harper's 
Weekly and other papers of similar size. If not entirely 
pleased, purchasers may return them within SO days. 
Just the thing for libraries and reading rooms, and all 
who wish to file the Pbess. lambp 



1 Pukchasebs [please say advertised in Scientific Press. 



A LARGE, FRESH STOCK just in, of Pawtucket 
manufacture, for California trade, HEAVY, STRONG 
and DURABLE. TREADWELL & CO., 

8v26-eowl6p San Francisco, 



V9 ■ EBBS B I ■ 

HairFeltmg 



For 

Steam Pipes 
U Boilers 

SAVES 25 PER CENT. OF FUEL.— An item worth 
looking after. Also, Steam Governors, Tube Scrapers, 
Steam Pumps, Self-Oilers, Cylinder Cups, Steam 
Gauges, Belting, Lacing, Hose, Ftise, Packing, etc., in- 
cluding all kinds Miners', Engineers' and Millmen's 
Supplies. TREADWELL & CO., old stand, Market St., 
head of Front, San Francisco. 8v26-eow 



The 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Farmers and Mechanics Bank of 
Savings. 

The Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Savings has de- 
clared a dividend for the half year ending June 30th, 
1873, at the rate of ten per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, eight per cent, per annum on class one, ordinary 
deposits, and six per cent, on class two, ordinary de- 
posits, free of Federal Tax. Payable on and after July 
14th, 1873. By order. 

jyl9-lm G. M. CONDER, Cashier. 



ORE BAGS FOR, SALE 

IN QUANTITIES TO SUIT. 
Apply to 

CROSS & CO., 

j30-d&stf 316 California street, San Francisco. 



Patent Self-Operating Brake 

For Vehicles— simple, powerful, durable. Pronounced 
by competent judges to be just what is required. Rights 
for sale. MUNSON G. PICKETT, Patentee. 

Newburyporfc, Mass., June 26, 1873. jy!2-4t 



HINTS FOR We wiI1 Bendon receipt of stamp for 
Hill IO ri/n postage, FREE, out 52-page Circular, 
containing 112 Illustrated Mechani- I iiwr MYHRC 
oalMovements;adigestofPATENT (■■ ■ tW I UllO. 

LAWS ; information how to obtain patents, and about the 
rights and privileges of inventors and patentees; list of 
Govermentfees.practicalhints etc., etc. AddressDEWEY 
A OO., Publishers and Patent Agents, San rancisco 



HALLIDIE'S 

Patent Endless Wire Eopeway. 

Covered by Numerous U. S. Patents. 

IMPORTANT TO 

Mining Companies, Oivil Engineers, Con- 
tractors, Etc. 

The system of transporting material, such as Ores, 
from the mine to the mill, Earths for embankments, 
Rock from quarries, etc., by means of steel wire rope, 
has been well tested and found more economical 
advantageous and reliable than any other method" 
of transportation; and to the annexed certificates in con- 
nection therewith I beg to call the attention of those in- 
terested: 

Eubeka, Nevada, July 10, 1872. 
T. M. Maetin My dear sir: On your leaving for San 
Francisco, it gives me great pleasure to hand you my 
written acceptance of the HALLIDIE TRAMWAY put 
up by you upon our mine in Freiburg. 

It is a perfect success, discharging ten tons of ore per 
hour with two men's labor. It is perfectly simple in 
construction, and, as far as I can judge, there is nothing 
about it to ever get out of order— nothing to wear out. 
While ours requires but about two thousand five hun- 
dred feet of wire rope, I can see no reason why the line 
could not be extended almost indefinitely with equally 
happy results. Again, the carrying capacity might be 
doubled or quadrupled if deBired. After several weeks 
trial upon our mine, the unanimous verdict of all who 
have seen it is a complete, unquestioned success. If 
this can be of any service to you, use it in any way you 
think proper. Very respectfully, C. C. GOODWIN. 
Emma Hill Consolidated Mining Co., ) 
Little Cottonwood, Utah, > 
_ , Superintendent's Oftice, Sept. 28, 1872. J 

T. M. Maetin, E>Q.— Sir: The Ropeway constructed by 
you (HALLIDIE'S PATENT) for the Emma Hill Consoli- 
dated Mining Company, has been built iu a most substantial 
and workmanlike manner, and is at this time in splendid 
working condition. I most cheerfulljr accept the work tor 
the Company, and recommend ii to others wishing a sure 
and speedy transit tor ores over places impracticable for 
wagon roads, etc. Respectfully, 

L. W. COLBATH, Superintendent. 
"The Vallejo works smoothly with the elevated wire 
tramway, which carries its loadof ore as auietly and easily 
as if there was no winter or snow in the world. 

'■ Whatever the objections to wire tramways may be on 
account of their cost, I have seen nothing yet that oven 
approaches them in the facilities they afford for moving 
ore at all seasons of the year."— Correspondent Utah Min- 
ing Journal, Alta, Jan. 8, 1873. 

The "Vallejo Ropeway. 

The Vallejo Tunnel Company's Tramwav in Littlo Coin 
tonwood, built on the HALLIDLE PATENTED PLAN, is 
a comlpete success. It is between 2,300 and 2,400 feot in 
lengtn.and is supported by thirteen stations The fall in 
tms distance is about 600 feet, and the wire rope, which Is 
three-fourths ot an Inch in diameter, Will safely and easily 
deliver one hundred tons in six hours. The machinery is 
automatic, loading and unloading the sacks or buckets. 
About one t n and a half can be Bent down at one time, 
the stations are about two hundred feet apart,and the entire 
apparatus is strong and safe, Ab the wire rope Is elevated 
about forty feet above the surface of the hill, the Tramway 
can be worked h11 winter long, without the slightest trou- 
ble.— Utah Mining Journal, Salt Lake, Sept. 23, 1872. 

Mining Comoanies and others desiring to negotiate for 
the erection of this sy&tem of Ropeway, can communicate 
with me personally, or through Postofllce Box *MI4, 

A. S. HALLIDIE, Patentee, 

113 and 115 Pine Street, San Fbanoisco. 
WIRE ROPE 
For hoisting from mines, transmitting power, ship rigging 
etc., of all kinds and sizes, on hand and made to order. 

Wire of all kinds and descriptions, furnished at lowest 
rates. A. S. HALLIDIE. 113 and 115 Pine St. 




An illustrated 



BY T>EWEY At CO. 
Patent Solicitors. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1873. 



VOLUME XXVII. 

Number 4. 



An Improved Truss Bridge. 

We herewith present an illustration of a new 
style of bridge trass, a patent for which has 
been recently Becured through the Scientific 
Pbkss Patent Agency. The patentee is a civil 
engineer in this State. We have heard no 
name proposed for this truss, but the terms 
"Serpentine," or "Alternating," suggest them- 
selves. The principal feature of novelty in 
this invention consists in the fact that certain 
portions of the truss are made to perform two 
separate functions, and yet are required to be 
only strong enough to perform the principal 
one. This may seem at Srst a paradoxical 
statement, but its correctness will be seen by 
reading this description. 

Before proceeding further, it maybe well to 
analyze very briefly the elements of a truss, 
such as the Howe or any other into which the" 
suspension principle 
does not enter. A truss 
consists of (1st) a top 
chord or beam, running 
nearly or quite the en- 
tire length of the Bpan- 
The strains on it are of 
compression or from the 
ends towards the mid- 
dle; (2d) a bottom chord 
extending the entire 
length of the span, and 
sustaining tensile strain, 
or the reverse of the top 
chord; (3d) a series of 
ties and diagonal braces 
between the ohords. 
The main object of 
these is to convert verti- 
cal strains into hori- 
zontal ones and transfer 
them to the chords. In 
the Howe, the braces are 
inclined towards the 
ends; these prevent dis- 
tortion. Without them the truss, when loaded 
at any particular point, would rise on each side 
of the load, and consequently be much weaken- 
ed. Counter braces are required to be stronger 
and heavier as the middle of the bridge .is ap- 
proached. These braces and oounters, ties, 
etc., are called "web members," 

From the foregoing it will be seen that there 
is a limit to the span of a truss bridge, on ac- 
count of the immense load of " web members" 
which a long span has to carry. It will also 
be seen that the chords have to increase in 
size and strength. Therefore the weight of a 
bridge does not increase as the length, but in 
a constantly-increasing ratio to the length 
itself; and after passing a certain limit of span, 
the bridge becomes so heavily-loaded with its 
own dead weight that it has no reserve strength 
to bear working loads. We will now pass to 
the consideration of the serpentine or alter- 
nating truss. 

This invention consists essentially of a meth- 
od of alternately uniting and separating a 
series of timbers into curved openings or bays. 
Two timbers for instance, may be firmly united 
in the middle and at the ends, and then strained 
apart at the intermediate points, making two 
bays. They may be carried into any number 
of bays, and another pair of timbers of the 
same or less length, but with similar openings 
may be placed on top; and the whole firmly 
united together, all timbers being properly 
keyed at the points of tangency. By this means 
it is apparent that the power of the timbers 
composing a bay, to resist a vertical strain, 
either upward or downward, is increased. It 
is also evident that their power to resist tensile 
or compressive strain is in no respect dimin- 



ished — it being granted that the timbers are 
thick enough or are so secure, that distortion 
in a vertical plane cannot take place. There- 
fore the statement at the beginningof this article 
holds Rood, and the Bame parts may perform 
two different offices and yet need only be strong 
enough to perform the more severe one. Fur- 
ther; these openings may be of variable lengths; 
longer in one portion of a structure, and shorter 
in another; thus allowing an economical distri- 
bution of material. The individual timbers 
may also begin and end very nearly where the 
proportions of the structure demand, which is 
another feature of economy. The truss may 
be executed in wood or iron. The illustrations 
given, Bhow only the application to wooden 
structures. 

The larger engraving exhibits the general 
design of a bridge of 150 feet span, some of the 
minor details, common to all bridges, being 
omitted for the sake of simplicity. The design 
is an adaptation of the new method to a "bow- 
string" truss. The top chord is made, as arched 
chords generally are, by placing several tim- 
bers or pieces, one on the top of the other, so 



tnbntiug the strain and relieving the weak 
portions. Neither are perfect joints so essen- 
tial to this bridge as to others. In some trus- 
ses one imperfect joint will render useless one- 
fifth of the material of the chord and endanger 
the safety of the structure; or — going farther — 
it may be like a defective link in a chain; for a 
chain is no stronger than its weakest 'link. In 
this truss the timbers cannot but come to an 
even bearing and the work will be allotted to 
each portion according to its strength. When 
the bridge settles from use, the camber can be 
restored by simply shortening the opening 
struts and drawing up on the rods. 

The smaller engraving, shown beneath, pre- 
sents a section of a roof truss of 75 feet 
span, with a rise of five or six feet in the 
middle. The struts, a a, are more numerous 
in this than the other, additional ones being 
inserted where the curves change from direct 
to reversed. The purlins, c c, are placed over 
struts and the tie-bolts, o o, pass through them 
and the truss, firmly securing the whole. The 
rafters and covering are represented at d d. A 
long tie-rod might be passed lengthwise through 




NEW FORM OF TRUSS BRIDGE. 



that the greatest dimension of transverse sec- 
tion of each shall be horizontal. At any points 
demanded by the proportions, A and B for 
instance, these timbers are separated and a 
strut inserted, half the timbers being on each 
side. Portions of these timbers are brought 
together again to make the first bay, while the 
top and bottom timbers are further separated 
to make the next two bays. This alternate 
opening and closing is continued through the 
length of the chord, the struts, a a, being dis- 
posed as shown, and longer struts placed under 
them and connecting the top and bottom 
chords. The screw bolts or suspension rods, 
b o, run entirely through, sustaining the load 
on the bridge and holding all the timbers firm- 
ly in place. The top chord may be braced 
laterally in the usual manner, by outside 
braces, c c, resting at their feet on floor beams 
extended for that purpose. The floor timbers 
are shown at d d, Now as to the effect of a 
load on the bridge. 

A "bow-string" truss, which is uniformly 
loaded throughout its entire length will settle 
equally, there will be no distortion, and counter- 
bracing is not needed. Therefore it will be 
necessary to discuss only the effect of a local 
or moving load on the truss. Suppose the load 
occurs at any particular part of the truss, say 
the middle of it; the strain is carried by the 
suspension rods and given to the upward 
curves of the bays over the load. Any upward 
thrust on either side of the load, which is usu- 
ally met by counter-braces, is amply resisted 
by the downward curves in the adjacent open- 
ings. Thus the necessity of counter-braces 
between the chords is obviated. Not the least 
item of excellence in this method of composing 
timbers is that the system is compensating; 
that is to say, if the timbers of any bay are de- 
fective or weaker than the average, their ten- 
dency is to open with a compressive strain ; that 
crowds those of the bay above or below closer 
together, thus lengthening them out and dis- 



the tangent points of the lower openings from 
end to end of the truss. A roof truss more 
economical in material and space it would be 
difficult to design. The main features of excel- 
lence for which this method commends itself 




may be summed up very briefly: (1st.) Econ- 
omy of material and labor. (2d.) Its lightness, 
which allows increased span. 

We may have occasion to refer to this sub- 
ject again and present some other designs. 
The system admits of such a variety of forms 
and has so many adaptations that space for- 
bids the exhibition of but a small portion at a 
time. 



Academy of Sciences. 

The regular semi-monthly meeting of the 
California Academy of Science, was held on 
Monday evening last. Professor Davidson in 
the chair. Messrs. D. O. Mills and H. H. 
Moore were elected life members, and J. C. 
Horner de Tavel and A Gros, resident mem- 
bers. A collection of fossil shells from an alti- 
tude of 800 feet on Cerros Island, off the Lower 
California coast, was presented by Lieut. Com- 
mander C. W. Kennedy. Capt. Wm. Hotzgar, 
presented several small lobsters from Magdale- 
na Bay; also specimens of the nautilus. From 
C. A. Wetmore, specimens of pottery, fibre 
and twine, from the ancient graves of the Incas, 
in Peru. Specimens of paper manufactured 
from wood were donated by Alexander Austin. 
A number of very handsome views of the 
Yellowstone country were exhibited by the 
President. 

Mr. Henry G. Hanks 
presented samples of 
cuproscheelite; describ- 
ed the mineral fully; it 
is referred to in another 
column of this issue. 

Professor Davidson 
exhibited drawings and 
described in detail the 
construction and appli- 
cation of ah improved 
telemeter. We will pro- 
bably give an extended 
description and illus- 
tration of the improved 
instrument in a future 
issue of the Press. 

A deed was read by 
the President by which 
James Lick conveyed to 
the Academy 40 feet 
front adjoining the prop- 
erty already given by 
him. This makes the 
whole gift 120 feet by 
275 feet of ground on 
Market street, in one of 
the most desirable loca- 
tions in the city. The 
property is estimated as being worth about 
$250,000. 

Dr. Hewston moved that the President and 
Trustees be authorized to receive the addition- 
al donation of James Lick and return the 
thanks of the Academy. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Dr. Stearns submitted for publication two 
papers on the Shells of Lower California. 

C. A. Wetmore explained the peculiarities of 
a collection of skulls taken from the ancient 
graves of Peru, on the eastern slope of the 
Andes. 

Dr. Steams announced the death of Colonel 
John W. Foster, President of the Geological 
Society of Chicago, and an eminent American 
scientist. On motion, Dr. Stearns was ap- 
pointed to prepare resolutions appropriate to 
the event. 



Alta, Little Cottonwood, Utah, is excited 
over the fact that some parties in Salt Lake 
City hold a United States patent for the land 
on which the town is situated. If the parties 
holding this patent are unscrupulous specula- 
tors, it will be troublesome for Altaites; but if 
they are sensible men, they will deal honestly 
and fairly with the people of the town. If 
they put on the screws too heavily, however, 
the people of Alta had better take their town 
bodily, and move to some other locality near 
by. As it is pretty high up in the mountains, 
they will have a down grade to move on, 
which is one advantage. 



The International Mill at White Pine, 
which was destroyed by fire some time since, 
is being rebuilt by the Eberhardt & Aurora 
Mining Company. This mill had 60 stamps, 
30 crushing dry and 30 wet. It was complete 
in every respect and cost a fortune to build. 
The new mill will have 30 stamps. The ma- 
chinery injured by the fire is being repaired 
and will be used again. 

Secretary Delano has decided against the 
squatters in the Eureka mining case; also that 
in the six days wherein is granted the time to 
give notice of adverse claim, the first and last 
days are inclusive. 

The adverse claim to the application of the 
Tiger Silver Mining Company for a patent to 
the Tiger Lode in Arizona, has been rejected 
by Commissioner Drummond. 



50 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS- 



[July 26, 1873. 



ORRESPONDENCE. 



Notes of Travel in Eureka County, 
Nevada. 

[By Our Traveling Correspondent.] 
Eureka. 
In my last, I gave you a scrap of the early 
history of this place; since writing, I find a 
great many differing as to date, and some few 
as to the names of the early Pioneers of the 
place. I venture to say that there are a great 
many humble miners who had no title of Col. 
or Capt. to their names in that day, nor even 
now, whose history, if known and written, 
would make an interesting volume. 

A little of what exists here besides mining, 
may not be uninteresting, so I will mention 
first, 

The Climate 
Of this section of Nevada is not as severe as 
one would suppose. During the past four 
winters, the thermometer never but once was 
as low as —2°, (the lowest point reached last 
winter was 6 C ) and in the summer not above 
85° or 88°. The winter begins late and con- 
sequently "lingers in the lap of spring." On 
Prospect mountain snow falls three or four 
feet deep, disappearing entirely in Slay or 
June. In the valley it is seldom over six or 
eight inches deep, and remains but a short 
time. 

Rain falls tolerably regularly in Spring (April 
or May) and summer (July and August) ; often 
in summer accompanied with much thunder 
and lightning. The grazing on the mountains, 
and in the valleys in ordinary years is excel- 
lent, but the almost total absence of the usual 
spring rains, gives the country just now a 
rather desolate appearance. 
Botanical. 
To the Californian, in his land of flowers, 
accustomed to hear Nevada spoken of only as 
a sage brush desert, the idea of dilating on 
the varieties of flowers here might seem ridic- 
ulous; but I am assured by an old resident 
that there are in ordinary seasons great num- 
bers of flowers, insects and birds. My friend 
has known of a bouquet containing some sixty- 
eight different kinds of wild flowers, gathered 
on the Sacramento plains, and he assures me 
that he gathered a bouquet containing twenty- 
seven different kinds of wild flowers, while go- 
ing to the mines a short distance from home, 
among which were roses, fleur de lis, cineraria, 
phlox, tulips, campanella, Indian pink, batch- 
elor's button, daisy, larkspur, wild pea, and oth- 
ers whose names were unknown to him, and that 
with a little care, not less than forty or fifty 
kinds could be found, and this in the dryest 
of all seasons. The foliage of some of * the 
smaller shrubs and grasses is beautiful and 
very delicate. 

Ornithology. 
Flowers attract insects, and insects attract to 
the district many varieties of birds, such as 
larks, robins, mocking-birds, catbirds, black- 
birds, oreoles, wrens, and besides many of the 
smaller ground birds and wood warblers, and 
above all that splendid singer Audubon's war- 
bler, who sings for hours, both day and night, 
known all over Nevada. 

During the summer months, the wind blows 
regularly from the south, often bringing with 
it along the travelled routes clouds of dust, but 
this is only near the roads, and is not felt ofl 
the line of travel. 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

Fruit trees of the hardier kinds might be 
raised to advantage, as there is nothing in the 
climate to prevent it, but so far no attempt has 
been made. Vegetables of all common kinds 
are raised in the towns by the Chinese, and on 
the ranches in the vicinity. Potatoes, espec- 
ially, grow finely. Mr. Chas. Bray raised and 
exhibited here potatoes grown on his ranch 
(the Cottonwoods) last year, as fine both as to 
size and quality as can be produced anywhere. 

All of this goes to show that with time and 
care ail such necessaries of life could be raised 
here, and many pleasant and comfortable 
homes be built up, even in the sage brush wilds 
of Nevada. 

Eureka Cons. (VI. Co. 
So much has been written and said about this 
corporation, that it will be hardly necessary to go 
into detail or mention anyone connected with it 
except the active officers : A. M. Ellsworth Esq., 
is the General Superintendent, and M. Lamb| 
Mining Foreman. The mine of this company 
is located nearly south of the town of Eureka, 
and distant about two miles, on what is known 
as Euby Hill. The possessions of this 
Company are bounded by those of other cor- 
porations as follows: The K. K. Min. Co., on 
their southeast; and the Richmond M. Co., 
( Limited ), on their northwest. The 
ore body of this company runs in a direction 
bearing a little north of west by south of east. 



Present Development 
Is being made through two principal shafts, 
each of two compartments and known as the 
Windsail and Lawton shafts, both vertical, and 
the depths of which are: "Windsail, 2oo feet, 
and Lawton, 300 feet. This latter shaft has 4 
levels, commencing from the top. The 1st 
level is 74 feet from the surface and is run in a 
southwesterly course a distance of 630 feet, and 
cross-cut 150 feet additional. The 2nd level is 
170 feet from the surface, runs a north of 
west course, and is in 360 feet; 520 feet of cross- 
cuts have been run on this level. The 3d 
level is 220 feet from the surface, runs in a 
northerly direction, and is in 310 feet, and has 
220 feet of cross-cuts. The 4th level is at the 
bottom of this shaft, 300 feet from the surface, 
runs south of west, in 220 feet, and is cross- 
cut 230 feet more. 

The Windsail Shaft. 
This shaft has four levels, calculated on a base 
line however, from the Lawton shaft, although 
the top of this shaft is 53 feet more of eleva- 
tion, which must be added to the calculation 
below the surface. The 1st level is 28 feet 
down, and run in 70 feet; the 2nd level is 
down 88 feet, and run in 95 feet; the 3d level 
is down 140 feet, and in 55 feet; the 4th level 
is down 202 feet, and in 160 feet. The general 
course of the ore body in this company's 
mines is nortwest by southeast, and in some 
places where they are now extracting ore, the 
pay-streak is 50 feet wide, and they do not 
know how much wider. The extent of 

Mining Ground Claimed 

By this corporation, by location and purchase, 
is about 90 acres, or 1,480 feet long by 910 feet 
wide, the most of which is covered by U. S. 
Patent. They own 14 locations, the following 
of which are the principal ones: Buckeye, 
Champion, Savage, Lewiston, Mammoth, At 
Last, Margarite, Lupita, Elliptic and Triangle. 
I neglected to state that they have still another 
shaft, besides the two above mentioned, called 
the "Buckeye," a whim-shaft, (the other two 
have fine steam hoisting works over them.) 
This shaft is 170 feet deep and has 3 levels; 
the 1st one is down 100 feet, and in 240 feet, 
running east; the 2d level is down 125 feet, 
runs west and is in 120 feet; the 3d level starts 
in at a point 129 feet from the surface and is 
in 90 feet in a northeasterly direction. I would 
add further that a tunnel connects the 74-foot 
level in the Lawton shaft, with the ore shutes, 
so no ore is raised to the top of the shaft. 

Ore Extracted. 

The number of tons of ore extracted daily 
from this mine varies, but averages about 100 
tons, which also vary in value, but average 
about $35 per ton. They employ about 200 
men on an average, the wages of whom are: 
Miners $4 per day, timber carpenters $4.50, 
smelters $4.50, engineers $5 to $6, carpenters 
from $5 to $8, which schedule of prices paid 
for wages, is the same in the rest of this district . 
The ore is hauled by contract from the mine to 
the furnaces, and costs $2 per ton. This com- 
pany's furnaces, or 

Smelting Works, 
Are located in the lower part of the town of 
Eureka, about 2 miles distant from the mines. 
These works have 5 first-class furnaces, two of 
which are in constant operation, driven by a 
50-horse power engine, connected with three 
54-inch boilers, all of which have been thor- 
oughly overhauled, together with the furnaces, 
engine, and several new appliances, and one 
new main shaft, since Mr. Ellsworth, the pres- 
ent Superintendent, took charge of the com- 
pany's works; add to the above 1 Blake rock- 
breaker, 5 Sturtevantblowers and one splendid 
steam pump, to be used in case of fire, and you 
have as complete a working furnace as there is 
in this camp. A machine shop is connected 
with these works for doing their own repair- 
ing, driven by a separate engine. A first-class 
lathe, with all the usual appliances, is to be 
found in their shop. The furnaces of this com- 
pany are able to smelt about 40 tons of ore 
each, daily, turning out from 5 to 8 tons of 
bullion each, every 24 hours. The company 
turn out from 312 to 543 tonsof bullion month- 
ly, that is worth in gold, silver and lead, about 
$400 per ton. 

The Adams Hill Mine, 
A fine property, is at present lying idle, al- 
though considered here among the first-class 
mines of this district. They have fine hoisting 
works, and one main shaft down 257 feet, all 
the way in ore that will average from $60 to 
$80 per ton in silver and gold, about 600 tons 
of which are now on the company's dumps. I 
could obtain no particulars as to when they in- 
tended to again start up. 

Richmond Mirrng Co. (of Nevada), 
Located on Euby Hill, about '2% miles in 
a northwesterly direction from the town of 
Eureka, Nev., J. J. Corrigan, Pres.; Trustees 
— J. B. McGee, Thos. Wren and J. J". Corrigan; 
J. B. McGee, General Supt. Incorporated in 
February of this year. 

This mine was one of the first claims worked 
after this district became known, the history 
of which is a long story, and probably unin- 
teresting to your readers. Suffice it to say, 
that it is what was known as the "Richmond 
Consolidated M. Co." and formerly owned by 
Ogden, Dunn& Co., of Eureka, Nev., and has 
been worked successfully by different manage- 
ments, since the year L870/ 

Mining Ground Owned 
Consists of the following locations, obtained 
by purchase and otherwise.viz: The Richmond ; 



Virginia; Look-out; Colorado; Silver Region 
and Tip-Top, making an aggregate of about 
5,000 feet of ledges. 

The ledges, or ore bodies, have the same 
general course as all others on the hill, i. e., 
northwest by southeast. The general character 
of the country rock is limestone; the ore found 
is base, carrying Bilver, gold and lead, and pays 
about $50 per ton in silver and gold, and runs 
about 25 per cent. lead. This mine has had 
an immense amount of labor performed upon 
it since my visit here one year ago. The 

Tunnels, Shafts, &c, 
Constituting the present development are as 
follows: One tunnel, now in about 400 feet, 
running through the lime cap, and now within 
50 feet of the ore body. This tunnel will be, 
when completed, 550 feet in length, and will 
terminate at what is known as the Look-out 
shaft, which shaft is down vertically 280 feet, 
and in ore. Their principal shaft is an incline, 
down about 400 feet, on au angle of 35°. From 
this incline shaft some 500 feet of cross-cutting 
has been made; this incline shaft is distant 
about 400 feet from the Look-out, and about 
300 feet of that distance has been mined out, 
exposing the largest ore body in the world — 
outside of the Comstock lode. 

An Immense Ledge. 

That portion of this mine already worked out, 
shows that an ore body 250 ft et wide, and from 
30 to 80 feet thick exists. This same ore body 
is still facing them, and even larger, now, than 
that portion taken out. By way of quotation, 
I see in a recent number of the London Mining 
Journal, that, by an estimate made by Clarence 
King, there is ore enough in sight in this mine 
to produce $3,500,000 worth of bullion, or, in 
their language, seven hundred thousand pounds 
sterling. This company are employing at their 
mine, about 60 men, night and day; and are 
extracting about 100 tons of ore daily. This 
ore is hauled by contract from the mine, at 
$2.50 per ton, to 



Milung at Mineeal Hill. — "We have re- 
ceived the following letter from Mr. H. H. 
Oakes, Superintendent of the mill of the min- 
eral Hill Silver Mines Company, which explains 
itself: 

Editors Mining and Scientific Pbess: — I 
notice in your interesting paper of the 12th inst. 
under "Notes of Travel in Eureka and Elko 
Counties, Nevada," by your travelling Corres- 
pondent, that makes mention of the high price 
charged for reducing ores by the Custom Mills, 
which he understands is $35 per ton. As there 
is no other Custom Mill in the immediate neigh- 
borhood of Mineral Hill, I concluded his 
remarks referred to the mill of the Mineral Hill 
Silver Mines Company. 

As his statement is apt to mislead the public 
who may have ores to work, will you allow me 
space in your valuable paper to say, that the 
price charged for reducing ores at the mill of 
my Company, is now, (as it always has been,) 
$30 per ton; returning to the owners of tbe ore, 
from SO to 84 per cent, of the assay value ac- 
cording to the grade of ore worked. I don't 
think any one can call this an unreasonable 
charge. I venture to say, there is not a mill 
in the State which will work custom ores at a 
lower figuie. 

I am Dear Sir, yours most obediently, 

H. H. Oakes, Supt. 



The Company's Furnaces, 

Located in the upper portion of the town of 
Eureka, and distant from the mine, (as above 
stated) 2% miles. 

This corporation's smelting works consist 
of two large furnaces, that have a capacity of 
reducing 80 tons of ore every 24 hours, work- 
ing 35 men in all departments. The engine, 
blowers, rock-breaker, and all the usual ap- 
pliances used around a furnace, are in use 
here; many new ideas and improvements have 
been introduced here since my last visit, all 
of which are meritorious; but time and space 
forbid special attention of each at this time. 
In addition to furnishing ore for their own 
furnaces, they are having about 45 tons of ore 
per day reduced at the Hoosac Smelting Works, 
using some of their surplus ore now on hand 
to supply both 

Coal and Wood. 

This company use about 3% cords of wood, 
and 2,200 bushels of charcoal daily, to run their 
furnaces. "Wood is worth per cord (by contract) 
$6.50, and charcoal 28 cts. per bushel. The 
consumption at this furnace is 1,277 cords of 
wood, and 804,000 bushels of charcoal. The 
average production of base bullion at this 
Company's furnaces is 435 tons monthly, and 
including the bullion made by the Hoosac 
Works, it will run 650 tons monthly, worth 
about $300 per ton, about $240 of which is 
silver and gold. 

Industry Mine. 

This mine, located on the east side of Pros- 
pect mountain a little west of south from Eu- 
reka, and distant about 4 miles, is owned by 
five partners; M. P. Murphy, owning one- 
third, and the following named gentlemen own- 
ing a sixth interest each: J. W. Sullivan. James 
Miley, Laurence Hartnett and Donald Fraser. 
Mr. Murphy is Acting Superintendent. These 
gentlemen claim 1,000 feet of a ledge, or ore 
body, Tunning north and south, and dipping to 
the west. The character of the country rock is 
limestone on both sides. At present this claim 
is lying idle, but the 

Previous Development 

Consisted of 3 shafts sunk to depths varying 
from 10 to 45 feet, and fhree open cuts, two of 
which run to two of the shafts. By the above 
mentioned development, an ore body appar- 
ently continuous was found, varying in width 
from 4 to 10 feet. A tunnel has also been run 
into this mine, at a higher point on the hill, 
in which, some 14 feet from the surface, an ore 
body 4 feet thick is found. This company have 
had 5 tons of ore worked at the Richmond fur- 
nace, that paid a little over $70 per ton, and 6 
tons worked at the Lemon mill paid $90 per 
ton, and 25 tons just worked at the Ruby Con- 
solidated furnace paid $83 per ton. The above 
tests and development show a very flattering 
prospect. A full force of men will be put upon 
this mine, before this appears in print, with 
night and day shifts. You may expect some- 
thing more flattering from this mine, shortly. 
They have about 70 tons of fine ore on their 
dumps at this writing. 

Charcoal Producers. 

The production of charcoal in this section of 
the country, is an sxtensive one, and worthy 
of notice. Some 8 different contractors are en- 
gaged in coal-burning here, and employ about 
1,000 men, producing about 2,000,000 bushels 
annually. Messrs. Whisler & Reilly furnish 
about 1,250,000 bushels of that amount, employ 
about 400 men, and bring into requisition some 
200 yolk of oxen. l. p. mc. 

[Concluded next week ] 



Mount Diablo Coal Mines. 

A correspondent of the Call writes as follows 
from Somersville: At Somersville are situated 
the Union, Independent, Eureka and Pitts- 
burgh mines. The latter company have recent- 
ly purchased the Independent and Eureka, and 
are busily engaged in repairing shafts, tunnels 
and machinery, preparatory to working them — 
these two mines having been idle for some time . 
In the Superintendent of the Pittsburgh, Mr. 
C. W. Clarke, I recognized an old Tuolumne 
acquaintance. As theforeman, Mr. J.H. Smith, 
was about making his morning round of inspec- 
tion, I accepted his invitation to accompany 
him. Donning a mining suit, and placing one 
of the little coffee-pot-like lamps on my head, 
I descended the slope in a car. The air seemed 
to be very close on arriving at the first lev^l, 
and I was cautioned about walking too fast. 
The first gangway we entered was about 1,100 
feet long; we started at a slow walk to traverse 
this distance. A small railroad track is laid 
the whole length. Alter progressing about two 
hundred feet a faint rumbling noise was heard, 
growing more distinct each moment. Mr. 
Smith informed me that it was one of ihe small 
coal cars coming, and pointed out a little niche 
in the rocky wall for us to stand in while it 
passed. The cars run on a gentle down grade, 
and each one is accompanied by a young man, 
called a " car runner." On came the car, and 
soon a faint light appeared in the darkness, 
growing more distinct as it approached. I flat- 
tened myself as much as possible against the 
wall, and noticed that I had just three inches 
to spare as the car went whizzing by, with its 
"car-runner" perched on the rear end, look- 
ing, for all the world, with his head light on, 
like a veritable imp of darkness. We passed 
three of these "flying devils" before we 
reached the end of the tunnel, or gangway, as 
they are called in coal mines. I noticed wide 
spouts or "shutes," as we passed along, and 
upon inquiry, their use was explained to me. 
At a distance of about, fifty feet from the slope, 
the first " shute " is put in and numbered No. 
1, and so on at each fifty feet the whole length 
of the gangway. As this gangway was about 
1,100 feet long it contained twenty-two 
"shutes." The gangway runs parallel with the 
length of the vein. It is about fix feet square. 
The vein of coal being only about three and a 
balf feet thick, the miner necessarily has to cut 
out from three to four feet of sand-rock on the 
bottom of the gangway, on which is laid the 
car track. The coal vein pitches at an angle 
of thirty degrees, and when a " shute " is put 
in the coal is cut out to the width of about five 
feet and the thickness of the vein ; a wooden 
trough five feet wide, about one foot in depth, 
and several feet in length, with sheet-iron on 
the bottom, is inserted. The miner then ex- 
tends this opening in a straight line, following 
the pitch of the vein to the next gangway, thus 
securing an air passage. He then commences 
taking out the coal on each side of him for 
about fifteen feet, and leaving a strip some 
twenty feet wide between the "shutes" for 
supports. In this space of three or four feet 
in height the miner crawls, and, either sitting 
or lying down, works out the coal with a pick. 
The cars pass along . under the ends of the 
"shutes," which project a little into the gang- 
way, and. receive their load of coal. 

In taking out the pillars of coal, when they 
are of no further use, great care is used to pre- 
vent accidents, and soon the lower ledge of 
sand-rock swells and closes up the space from 
which the coal has been taken. The foreman 
is extremely careful in sending his men to do 
this work, and in f'ae ten years that this mine 
has been worked but three men have been 
killed. The Pittsburgh Company employs 160 
men, and are averaging about 4,000 tons of 
coal per month. The Union, superintended 
by H. S. Hawxhurst, employs about 100 men. 
The coal from these two mines is transported 
by railroad to Pittsburgh Landing on the San 
Joaquin river, a few miles below Antioeh. The 
Central Company's mine is situated about half 
a mile southeast of Somersville. A large por- 
tion of the stock of this company is owned by 
Messrs. Shattuck i Hillegass, of Oakland. Mr. 
Stewart is the Superintendent. The coal is 
transported by teams to Antioeh. 



July 26, 1873.] 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS. 



51 



Mechanical Progress 

Ancient Construction. 

Moss was the predominant feature of ancient 
constructions, and clay, earth, bricks aud 
Btones, the principal materials. The intro- 
duction of the arch or vault was one of the 
earlest substitutions of the hollow fur the solid. 
If a solid, massive, square pillar have the middle 
portion cut out and an arch turiu-d orer the 
top, there is so much of the original mass re- 
moved, and u new style of construction, so to 
call it, introduced. It has been generally ad- 
mitted that the invention of the arch is due to 
the Romans, yet there can be very little doubt 
but that the Assyrians were thoroughly ac- 
quainted with it, although clay in some shape 
or another constituted almost their sole construc- 
tive material. This formed the nucleus of the 
enormous artificial inouuds which that people 
were fond of raising on which to erect their 
palaces, citadels, and other commanding build- 
ings. Instead of excavating; foundations upon 
which to build, an artificial foundation was 
raised and the superstructure placed thereon. 

Modern works are now conducted on a scale 
so gigantic that we are pretty well accustomed 
to immense shifts of earth; but rnechauical ap- 
pliances are at our command which were un- 
known to our predecessors, who used neither 
wagons nor barrows, but haud labour only in 
its simplest form. In the erection of the artifi- 
cial mounds to which we have alluded, the 
Assyrians wero not in the habit of using the 
cluy at random, but mixed and prepared it with 
great care, so that it showed a uniform section 
everywhere when cut. It was completely free 
from Btones and all foreign bodies, and closely 
resembled in its consistency the best modern 
puddle. This material is now in numerous in- 
stances giving way to concrete, which promist s 
fair to be to us what the clay and bricks were to 
the ancients. In work of a character similar to 
the Thames Embankment the quautity of con- 
crete used in foundations and backing is some- 
thing enormous. 

Explorations at Nineveh have shown that 
except for paving purposes stone rarely en- 
tered into the construction of the walls and 
buildings. They consisted of clay only, which 
had evidently been moulded in the shape of 
bricks, and put together without the aid of 
mortar or cement of any kind. In the few ex- 
amples in which stone was found to be employed 
the joints were made in the same manner, that 
is, by .simple juxtaposition. Mortar aud ce- 
ment appear to have been rarely or never em- 
ployed. The size of the stones was consider- 
able, so that mere weight would, to Rome extent, 
render superfluous the employment of any 
adhesive substance at the joints. But this was 
not the case with the bricks, which were nearly 
of a square form, 1ft. -tin. on the sides by 2in. 
in thickness. 

The question which remains unsettled is, in 
what degree of consistency were these bricks 
at the time they were put together? Were 
they sufficiently plastic to adhere together, or 
were they wetted before being used, so as to 
soften the surfaces merely which were in con- 
tact? Upon this supposition there would be an 
appreciable difference between the appearance 
of the body of the bricks aud that of the joints, 
which does not exist. There is, nevertheless, 
a slight difference in colour at these points, 
which looks like lines. 

The Assyrians have two varieties of baked 
bricks: the one was regularly shaped, with par- 
allel faces, and the other of a trapezoidal form. 
These latter were intended for arches or vaults, 
and the incliuation of the sides varied with the 
position which the particular brick was inten- 
ded to occupy in tho curve. 

The dimensions and proportions of the As- 
syrian bricks differ from those of modern man- 
ufacture. Those, employed in paving were of 
two sizes. One class was 1ft. 4in, by 1ft. 4in. 
by 2%in. in thickness, and the other 13in. by 
13in. by ±%in. thick. A peculiar feature in these 
old bricks is that they are with few exceptions 
covered with inscriptions in the cuneiform 
character. Two remarkable features in the 
construction of ancient cities were, first, that 
either the diagonals or tho direction of the sides 
pointed exactly towards the cardinal points, 
and, secondly, the enormous thickness of the 
walls of the principal buildings. It is probable 
that astronomical reasons dictated the former 
of these, and climatic exigencies the latter. In 
the case of Nineveh there can be little doubt of 
this, as the Assyrians were noted for their skill 
in astronomy, aud their partiality for the sci- 
ence. The thickness of the internal walls is 
scarcely over less than 10 ft., aud that of some 
of the external varies from 16ft. to 25ft. Some 
consideration must be given to the fact, with 
regard to the thickness of the walls, that the 
mode of building them with bricks merely dried 
in the sun required this dimension to be dis- 
proportionately great. 

lu the building of their domes and vaults the 
Assyrians employed a more brittle description 
of brick than in their walls and pavements, and 
the joints were made by grouting them with 
semi-fluid clay. The voussoir shape of these 
bricks proves that the theory of the arch must 
have been known at the time, and some con- 
siderable progress made in the preparation of 
artificial btones. There is no evidence of tim- 



ber being employed as a material of construc- 
tion by the people under notice. It was used 
only in small quantities, and for the purposes 
of ornament. It seems that iron was altogether 
unknown as a constructve material. Copper 
was turned to account for tho pivots or hinges 
of doors, and lead was also rendered service- 
ble. Enamelled bricks were common, and 
stucco was largely employed, as with us, for the 
double purpose of protecting the brickwork 
from the effects of the air, and hiding the 
roughness of the surface. 

There is one ceremony which appears to 
have existed at the time of the Assyrians, which 
is common to modern times as well. It is that 
of laying the first, or foundation- stone of a 
building. A recent French explorer, M. P. 
Place, discovered in a layer of fine sand under- 
neath one of the monoliths of the gates of 
Nineveh a variety of different objects in marble, 
agate and cornelian, which were cut and en 
graved, and were, moreover, all pierced with a 
hole, as if they had originally formed part of 
a bracelet or necklace deposited at the laying 
of the stone, as coins are deposited with us. 
While well versed in the practice of [earth- 
work, brickwork, and even masonry, the As- 
syrians were totally iguoraut of the art of con- 
struction considered in the light of an assem- 
blage of pieces of timber or iron. They could 
heap up materials so as to cause tho structure 
so composed to resist any outward force by its 
sheer weight or inertia, but they knew nothing 
whatever of the distribution of pressures, or 
how to proportion a structure so that it should 
bo equally strongin all parts. Both the labour 
aud the material were too abundant to call for 
economy in either one or the other. — Engineer. 

Safety Lamps in Mines. 

Some valuable researches on the conditions 
under which safety-lamps are truly safe have 
been conducted by Mr. R. Galloway, partly at 
the new Laboratories at South Kensington and 
partly at the Meteorological Office. Mr. Gal- 
loway has already found that if a Davy lamp be 
burning tranquilly iu an explosive atmosphere, 
the transmission of a sound wave, produced by 
a slight explosion of gunpowder, is sufficient 
to determine the communication of flame from 
the lamp to the surrounding atmosphere. 
Hitherto it has been generally assumed that 
the occurrence of a colliery explosion, after 
firing a shot, is due to actual communication 
of flame from the gun powder to the fire-damp; 
but Mr. Galloway's experiments show that it is 
much more likely that the explosion is deter- 
mined by the noise of the -hot being pro- 
pagated through the galleriesof the mine to the 
safety-lamps. An admirable experiment to 
illustrate this point was .exhibited by Dr. W. 
Spottiswoode at a recent lecture at the Royal 
Institution. A lighted Davy lamp was sur- 
rounded by streams of coal gas issuing from a 
number of jets round the base of the lamp. 
One extremity of a long tin tube, open at both 
ends, was placed in connection with the lamp, 
while a pistol was fired at the other end, a 
caoutchouc diaphragm being interposed in the 
tube to prevent the transmission of a direct 
current of air. The sound-wave, generated by 
the report, travelled along the tube, aud as soon 
as it reached the flame, caused ignition of the 
surrounding atmosphere— the lamp being im- 
mediately enveloped in flames. 

A Novel Railboad Stove. — A fire proof- 
stove for use iu passenger cars especially, was 
subjected to a severe test in Boston, recently. 
The stove is made of wrought and malleable 
iron. It is circular in form, composed of three 
upright cylinders and two cold air boxes at the 
bottom. The fuel is placed in the inner cylin- 
der. The cold air rushing through the cold 
air boxes drives hot air outward and upward 
through the cylinders, the rounded form giving 
a very powerful radiation. The heat escapes 
through a register in the back. The whole is 
firmly bound together by strong iron bolts. 
The doors are fastened by patent locks. At 
the trial, the stove, after the fire in it was well 
under way, was thrown from the staging upon 
which it was placed, to the ground, a distance 
of six feet. It was then rolled about, and 
tumbled over and over, but not a spark of the 
fire was spilled upon the shavings which were 
scattered around. When the stove-door was 
opened, the fire was burning briskly. The in- 
genious apparatus was invented and manufac- 
tured in Wilmington, Delaware, and it is be- 
lieved its general introduction would prevent 
the supplemental fires which so generally fol- 
low railroad accidents where stoves are used iu 
the cars, and which frequently cause almost as 
great a loss of life as the original break down. 

Station Announcer. — In every car on the 
Connecticut River railroad there is a box over- 
head at one end in which is contained the name 
of the next station, which it is the duty of the 
brakemeu to change as they leave the stations. 
It also states where they connect with other 
roads. As the change is made, a bell strikes 
twice, which attracts the attention of the pas- 
sengers, so that the box always exhibits the 
name of the next station, and so on. Thus 
passengers always know the name of the stop- 
ping-place, aud also if it connects with any 
other railroad. 




To Distinguish Ibon fkom Steel. — An En- 
glish engineer says that a good method to de- 
termine between steel and iron is to burn fil- 
ings of the samples in a flame, as steel would 
scintilate, while iron would burn quietly. 



Sympathetic Vibrations in Machinery. 

The vibrations I propose to demonstrate are 
those which are pitched so low as not to come 
within the limits of human ears, but which are 
felt rather than heard. I wish to show how 
these may be seen as well as felt. 

All structures, large or small, simple or com- 
plex, have a definite rate of vibration, depend- 
ing on their materials, size and shape, and as 
fixed as the fundamental note of a musical 
chord. They may also vibrate in parts, as the 
chord does, and thus be capable of various in- 
creasing rates of vibration, which constitute 
their harmonics. If one body vibrates, all 
others in the neighborhood will respond, if the 
rate of vibration in the first agrees with their 
own principal or secondary rates of vibration, 
even when no more substantial bond than the 
air unites this body with its neighbors. In 
this way mechanical disturbances, harmless in 
their origin, assume a troublesome and per- 
haps a dangerous character, when they enter 
bodies which are only too ready to move at the 
required rate, sometimes even beyond the 
sphere of their stability. 

At one time considerable annoyance was ex- 
perienced in a cotton mill because the walls 
and floors of the building were so violently 
shaken by the machinery; so much so, that, on 
certain days a pail of water would be nearly 
emptied of its contents, while, on other days, 
all was quiet. Upon investigation it appeared 
that the building shook in response to the ma- 
chinery only when it moved at a particular 
rate, coinciding with one of the harmonics of 
the structure; and the simple remedy was to 
make the machinery move at a little greater or 
a little less speed, so as to put it out of tune 
with the building. 

We can easily believe that, in many cases, 
these violent vibrations will loosen the cement 
and derange the parts of a building, so that it 
may afterwards fall under the pressure of a 
weight which otherwise it was fully able to 
bear, and at a time, possibly, when the machin- 
ery is not in motion. Large trees are up- 
rooted in gales of wind, because the wind 
comes in gusts; and if these gusts happen 
to be timed in accordance with the na- 
tural swing of the tree, the effect is ir- 
resistible. The slow vibrations which pro- 
ceed from the largest pipes of a great organ, 
and which are almost withoutthe range of mus- 
ical sounds, are able to shake the walls and 
floors of the building so as to be felt, if not 
heard. 

We have here, also, the reason of the rule 
observed by regiments on the march, when 
they cross a bridge, viz., to stop the band, and 
break step. This is lest the measured cadence 
of a condensed mass of men should urge the 
bridge to vibrate beyond its cohesive force. A 
neglect of this rule has frequently led to acci- 
dents. The Broughton Bridge, Manchester, 
gave way beneath the measured tread of sixty 
men only, who were marching across it. 

A few days ago a similar disaster befell a bat- 
talion of French infantry while crossing the 
suspension bridge of Angiers. Reiterated 
warnings were given to the troops to break 
into sections, but the rain falling heavily, the 
orders were disregarded; the bridge fell, and 
280 men were killed. 

When Galileo set a pendulum in strong 
vibration by blowing on it whenever it was 
moving away from his mouth, he gave a good 
illustration of the way in which small but 
regularly repeated disturbances grow into con- 
sequence. Professor Tyndall tells us that the 
Swiss muleteers tie up the bells of their mules, 
lest the tinkle shonli start an avalanche. The 
breaking of a drinking glass by the human 
voice, when its fundamental note is sounded, 
is a feat instanced by Chladiu, who mentions 
it as an experiment frequently repeated by an 
innkeeper for the entertainment of his guests, 
much to his own profit. 

Robert Stephenson has remarked that there 
is not so much danger to a bridge when it is 
crowded with men or cattle, or if cavalry are 
passing over it, as when men go over it in 
marching order. 

A chain bridge crosses the river Dordonge 
on the road to Bourdeaux. One of the Steph- 
ensons passed over it in 1845, and was so much 
struck with its defects, although it had been 
but recently erected, that he reported them to 
the authorities. A few years afterwards it gave 
way when troops were marching over it. 

The bark of a dog is able to call forth the 
response from certain strings of the piano; and 
a curious passage has been pointed out in the 
"Talmud," which discusses the indemnity to 
be paid when a vessel is broken by the voice of 
a domestic animal. If we enter the domain of 
music, there is no end to the illustrations which 
might be given of these sympathetic vibrations. 

In the case of vibrations which are simply 
mechanical, without being audible, at any 
rate in a musical sense, the following ocular 
demonstration may be given : A train of 
wheels, set in motion by a strong spring 
wound up in a drum, causes a horizontal spin- 
dle to revolve with great velocity. Two 
pieces of apparatus like this are placed about 
ten or twelve feet apart. On the ends of the 
spindles, which face each other, are buttons 
about an inch in diameter. The two ends of a 
piece of white tape are fastened to the rims of 
these buttons. When the spindles, with the 
attached buttons, revolve, the two ends of the 
tape revolve, and in such directions as to pre- 



vent the tape from twisting, unless the velocities 
are very different. Even if the two trains of 
wheels move with unequal velocities, when in- 
dependent of each other; their motions tend to 
uniformity when the two spindles are connected 
by the tape. Now, by moving slightly the 
apparatus at one end of the room, the tapj 
may be tightened or loosened. If the tape is 
tightened, its rate of vibration is increased 
aud, at the same time, the velocity of the spin- 
dles is diminished on account of the greater 
resiBtauce. If this tape is slackened, its rate 
of vibrution is less, and the velocity of the 
spindles is greater. By this change we can 
readily bring the fundamental vibration of the 
tape into unison with the machinery, and then 
the tape responds by a vibration of great am- 
plitude, visible to all beholders. If we begin 
gradually to loosen the tape, it soon ceases to 
respond, on account of the two-fold effect al- 
ready described, until the time comes when 
the volocity of the machinery accords with tho 
first harmonic of the tape, when the latter di- 
vides beautifully into two vibrating segments, 
with a node at the middle as the tension slowly 
diminishes, the different harmonics are suocess- 
sively developed, until at length the tape is 
broken up into a number of segments, only an 
inch or two in length, presenting the appear- 
ance of a beautiful wave liue. — Iron. 

i 

Progress of Astronomy in the United 
States. 

Mr. Richard A. Proctor, the distinguished 
British astronomer, bears tho following testi- 
mony to the progress and results of astromon- 
ical science in this country: 

"The American arrangements for extending 
government aid to astronomy seem to me to 
afford a model which might be copied with ad- 
vantage on this side of the Atlantic. We see 
their physical observatories attached to other 
government establishments, to universities, 
and so on. Their professors of astronomy are 
not only real working astronomers, but skillful 
mathematicians (for the moat part university 
men) and men of admirable zeal in the cause 
of science. I have been struck with the 
abundance, I had almost said the superabund- 
ance, of labor which has been bestowed on 
work, the record of which has recently reached 
me from America. Thus, in the mathemat- 
ical investigations of the coming transits of 
Venus, a problem of difficulty has but to be 
suggested, to be at once attacked and solved to 
the utmost limits of exactness. The pictures 
of solar phenomena, spots, facul% and promi- 
nences, are the most striking and beautiful I 
have yet seen. Their lunar pictures are 
remarkable for artistic beauty, as well as scien- 
tific value, and, altogether, their work, as I 
have said, is a model of our astronomers." 

Does the Sun Influence a Fibe ? — There is 
a common opinion, that the direct action of 
the rays of the sun diminishes the combustion 
of a common fire. This notion has often been 
ridiculed as erroneous; and, with a view to put 
it to the test of experiment, Dr. M'Keever as- 
certained the actual rate of combustion of well- 
known bodies, in different circumstances. It 
appears from these trials, that the quantity of 
wax-taper 1 consumed in broad sunshine, in the 
open air, is less than consumed in a darkened 
room, in the same time, in the proportion of 
ten to eleven. When the experiment was made 
with a common mould candle, an inch in length 
was consumed in fifty-nine minutes, in strong 
sunshine, temperature eighty degrees; in fifty- 
six minutes, in a darkened room, temperature 
sixty-eight degrees. Other trials were made to 
ascertain the effects of the different colored 
rays of the prismatic spectrum on combustion, 
and it was found to proceed most slowly in the 
verge of the violet ray. The times of consum- 
ing the same length of taper in the different 
portions of the spectrum were, in the red ray, 
eight minutes; green ray, eight minutes twenty 
seconds; violet ray, eight minutes thirty -nine 
seconds ; verge of violet ray, eight minutes fifty- 
seven seconds; the common opinion is there- 
fore correct; but the difference is not so con- 
siderable as might be expected. 



Non-Chemical Analysis. — That butter is 
not a single fat, but a mixture of fats, is perfect- 
ly well known to chemists, as may be seen on 
looking into almost any chemical hand-book. 
Apparently, however, there are those who pro- 
fess to be chemists, who are not aware of the 
fact, as may be instanced by the following 
report of a certain chemist, who was called to 
testify in court as to the quality of a lot of 
butter, the value of which was in dispute:— 
"The butter contains a quantity of stearin and 
palmatin. It is therefore largely adulterated 
by the admixture of fat containing these sub- 
stances, etc." The case in which this curious 
specimen of chemistry was exhibited was car- 
ried to a higher court, and is exciting some 
degree of interest. A public writer has already 
remarked that if the absence of stearin and pal- 
matin had been established in the sample, 
demonstration would in reality have been given 
that the sample contained no butter at all; and 
under cross-examination the witness appears 
to have modified his report to a slight extent. 
He seemed to say that — though for aught he 
knew to the contrary, stearin and palmatin may 
exist in genuine butter — they do not exist in 
the free state in butter. — Ex. 



52 



MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS 



[July 26, 1873. 



Table of Fluctuations. 

Shouting Highest and Lowest "Regular" Sales of Mining Stocks on the Board List of the 
Sail Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, during the last Four Weeks, togetJier 
with Number of Feet, Shares, Last Dividends and Assessments. 



NAME OF COMPAM"X 



■WASHOE. _ 

Alamo Gold and Silver M . Co 

Alpha Consolidated 

Alta ........... 

American Flat. 

Arizona ft Utah. ........... 

Bacon Mill and Mining Co. 
Baltimore Consolidated... 

Belcher.-.--. ■ 

Best* Belcher 

Bow era 

Buckeye 



Central 

Central No. Two 

Ohollar-Poto8i . . . ... ... •■■■■• 

Confidence Silver Mining Co. 

Cone. Gold Hill Quartz 

Consolidated Virginia 

Cook ft Geyer............. .-• 

Crown Point Gold and S. M. 

Daney.... 

Dardanelles 



Empire MiU'and.Minine Co. 







Exchequer 

Flowery 

Franklin 

Gerald ft Surry Silver Mining 

Hale ft Norcross 

Imperial 

Indus 

Insurance. . . . .- • • ■ ■ ■; ■ x - ■ 

Julia Gold and Silver M. Co. 

Justice 

Kentuck 

Knickerbocker 

Lady Bryan 

M?nt Gold and'Siiver'Mininfi 

Nevada. . . . . - ■ ■ ■ ■:■■,- 

New York Consolidated 

Occidental. .. .... ... . .-• ■ 

Ophir Silver Mining Co .. . . . 
Overman Silver Mining Co. . 

Phil. Sheridan . 

Piotou 

Rock Island 

Savage ••■:■;: 

Segregated Belcher. 

Segregated Caledonia....... 

Senator Silver Mining Go. .. 

SierraNevada 

Silver Hill 

South Overman.. ... .......... 

Succor Mill and Mining Co . . 

Sutro 

Trench 



Union Consolidated 

Woodville Gold and S. M. . . 
Yellow Jacket 



NEVADA. 

Adams Hill. . ... •.-•■■- 

Alps Silver Mining Co. ...... 

Amador Tunnel and Mining. 
American Flag Mill and M. . 

Arkansas 

Belmont 

Bowery . . ...... . ■ ■ ■ . ■ • . ■ -. 

Chapman Mill and Mining.. 
Charter Oak Silver Mining. . 

Chief of the Hill 

Chief East Extension. 

Columbus Mill and Mining. . 

Condor • ... ■ ■•:■■ 

Eureka Consolidated 

Excelsior 

Harper Silver Mining Co.... 

Hermes 

Home Ticket 

Huhn ft Hunt Silver Mining 
Ingomar Silver Mining Co.. 

Ivanhoe 

Jaokson.. ;■;"■■,- 

Juniata Consolidated 

Kentucky Gold and Silver. . . 

Kinston .... 

Lehigh...... 

Lillian Hall 

Louise 

McMahon 

Marion 

Meadow Valley 

Mocking-Bird 

Monitor Belmont 

Murphy 

Newark Silver Mining Co 

Pacific Tunnel and Mining. . 
Page ft Panaca Silver Mining 

Peavine 

Phoenix 

Pioche Silver Mining Co. . . 
Pioche "West Extension — 

Piocbe-Pboanix 

Portland 

Raymond ft Ely 

Silver Peak 

SilverWest Consolidated. . 
Standard Mill and Mining. 

Star Consolidated 

Starlight 

Sterling 

Spring Mount 

Spring Mountain Tunnel.. 

Ward Beeoher 

Washington and Creole 

Yellowstone 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine 

Bellevue 

Calaveras Gold Mining Co 
Cederberg Gold Mining Co 

Consolidated Amador 

Cottonwood Oreek 

Dunderberg Mill and Mining 
El Dorado Ind. Quartz M. 

Eureka GoldMining Oo 

Gillis 

Independent Gold Mining. 

Keystone Quartz 

ML. Jefferson 

Oakville Quartz Mining Co. 

Bye Patch 

St. Lawrence Mill and M. Co. 

St. Patrick 

Teoumseh ;'. , 

Yule Gravel 



30000 
1SO0O 
■J 1000 
51000 

in; 

22100 

5000 
16000 

: 

Z 

1OSII0 

2 ■ 

mm 

24960 
20000 
23600 

21000 

' no 

24000 
21000 
26000 

501 

■>< 

121 



16000 
100000 



36000 

50000 
10000 

iiSllill 

loooo 

16 

12800 
24OO0 
30000 
21000 
10000 
6100 
10000 
21000 

20000 

54000 

21000 
22800 
24000 

511 [I 
33000 

31000 

■' 

'.' 10 

21000 



1000 
iOOOO 



IDAHO. 

Empire 

Golden Chariot , 

Ida Ellmore 

Mahogany G. and S. Mining. 
Minnesota. Gold and Silver. . 

Red Jacket 

South Chariot 

War Eagle 



WHITE PINE. 

General Lee 

Mammoth Silver Mining Co. 

\oonday 

Original Hidden Treasure. . . 

Silver Wave 

Ward Beecher 

" "tj'tahV 

Deseret Consolidated 

Wellington 

'■"bBEsoij-'. 



32, July, 
" July, 



21, May, '67 



36, Oct., 70 
36, April, '71 
30, June, '68 



1. Mch., '69 
22, Mch. '64 



25, Aug., '71 



10000 
SOOOfl 

.-■ 

2.5000 

501 

12000 
30000 
10000 



50000 

501 

SO0O0 
10000 
30000 
15000 
30 

m 

10000 

6 1 

30000 

66666 

32000 



50000 

2.5000 
30000 

35 I 

20000 

30600 



20000 

21000 
25000 

II 

25000 



1800 20000 
3000 30000 
400 1000C 



b 

H 

IS 



, Feb., 
May, 



5, Mch. 1, '71 



1, May 17, '73 
5, June 16, '73 



3, June 3, '73 
6,"Feb''7',"'7i 



7, Jan. 21. 73 
45, Aug. 6, '72 
1, Feb. 5, '73 



... 15, June 11. '73 
... 1, Sept. 4, '72 
'73 6, May 28, '73 
'63 6, May 28, '73 



I. July 1, 
16, Apr. B, '73 

May 5, 
14. June 9, 
6. June 24, '73 
10, Apr. 25, '73 
' Mch. 24, '73 

l,'May"6,"'73 



4, Mav 31, " 
I, Feb. 8, " 
26, June 24," 
26, June 4, " 



3, Jnne 19, 
1, June 20, 
9, Apr. 5. 
14, July 20, 



June 24, " 
-...April 17," 
l.Dec. 24, " 



3, June 13, 
2, May 6. 
1, Mch. 12, 
15, Jan. 4, 



Dec. 23, '72 
May 6, '73 

1, June 4, '73 

2, June 3, '73 
" Jan. 16, '"" 



17, July, '73 
Mch.', 



•22, Feb., '73 



., Feb.. 1. 
5, April, '73 



1, July. '72 



9, April, '72 



25000 
10000 9, Mch., '71 
10000 6, Feb., '70 
""" 1, Aug., '72 



1, June, '70 



.. May 5, ' 
3, Moh. 4,' 

1, Mch. 3, ' 
May 23, ' 

. May 28, ' 

2, April 26, ' 

1, Sept. 12, ' 

i, june'26, 1 ' 

' Jan. 27, ' 

May 10, ' 

Ma'y"i2,"' 
.. Mch. 1, ' 

2. Deo. 12, ' 
6, June 25, ' 

.Jan. 17, 
6, June 2, ' 
' Aug. 26, ' 



2, Jan. 23, ' 

3. Sept. 15 ' 
1, June 19, ' 
' Deo. 9, ' 
.. May 30, ' 
1, Dec. 5, ' 



4, Apr. 10, 73 

Feb.' 3,"' 
., May 12, ' 
11, May 23, ' 
3, Feb. 21, ' 
' May 16, ' 
May 6, ' 
May 6, ' 



2, April 3,' 
4, June 10, ' 
1, May 16. ' 

3, June 19, ' 



1, July 15, ' 

2, Jan. 15, ' 
6, June 20, ' 

8,' April' 25^ ''73 



4. May 13, '73 
6, April 14, '73 
" Feb. 12, — 



1, July 20, '72 
3, Apr. 2, ~" 



4, Dec. 18, '72 



1, Mch. 11. .. 
6, Oct. 31, 72 
20, May 28, '73 
3. June 4, 73 



3, April 10, 73 
9, May 26, 73 
9, Moh. 25, 73 
9, Jtrne 11, 73 
6, May 21, — 

6," May '23,' 
1, Nov. 4, 72 



6, Jan. 9, .„ 
12, Mch. 3, 73 
14, May 31, 73 
8, Oct. 9, ' _ 

i; 'Nov'.' 21,' 72 



1, Sept. 16, ._ 
1, Nov. 12, 72 



WEEK EWBIIVG WEDNESDAY 



10s'.. I 

VA 



July » tfnlyO 



S P 



m m 



i~a wa 



S'A 

"2$ ' 

l:'o 
13 



1,0, 

111 1 ., 
10'j 



38>s 31J| 



35c 35c 

10c 10c 

2.M 2'A 

40c 15c 



12.^ ia 



i'A VA 

87 ',0 62>,ic 



25c 5c 

'iU "i" 



10'; 

2'A 



July 16 



w 



24 24 



27a i'A 
2 2 
8M VA 

n ma 
4M i'A 



103 I 



hii 5 

m « 

9« 8 

"Vi "i'A 
i'A VA 

13S4 11 



1« VA 
iVA ' 



1« 1 
ik Hi 

32 27 

36 30 



30c 30c 

162;* 127^ 
54 



62'.r 50c 
10)1 10 
20"3 20 



1« l*e 



4 314 
\'A 1 
25c 250 



VA 5« 



Vi 



2« VA 



50c 50c 

181* 18>s 

m m 
7 7 

15 12 
5 4 
3 2M 



J uly S3 



« 



81 
3A 



100 
i'A 



2!<i Hi 
9M Si 



26 l 2 20 
33,'i; 29 



25c 15c 

25c 25c 

45 62*. 
52 



62 '-c .50c 
10 9 
21 18 
50o 50c 

2 m 



214 Hi 
WA 50 



IX i'A 
3 2% 
H!i 5 



12 il'A 



6H 5 



Ira 1 

42'»c 30c 
45c 40o 
8« S'A 



i'A 1% 



21 21 
"VA "l 



'A 'A 

20 10J4 

life 72 

WA 15 

6 4!_ 

'i'A 2'A 

250 25c 



350 350 
b'A bA 



a tn 



sa is, 
2« 1* 
2 3 

9M 7J6 
m'A 76 
4 2« 



5 
45 

6M 


5 
35 
5 


92 


67 



5'j 3?j 
8 7>S 



»7)ic 75c 

32 23 
b'A 37, 



67 44, 1 * 

II.';. 33 



50c 40c 
»H 7>> 
18 14 
50c 50c 
ik Hi 



Hi i'A 
53 44^ 



1'^ 62'i,c 
2;« 2« 
bA ' 



Ira 

62 '-c 



15c loci 
VA 2fe 

■in ■■ 



|18« 17 
' 75'c 



1 

30c 
30c 

714 

1 

314 



57,'s 



20 20 

"iiitsi'k 



T' "6>i 



750 


50c 


19', 


17 


4 


'AH 


Hl$ 


'IU 


14 


i) 


i'A 


i'A 



25c 25c 
"bA "b 



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